Menstruation and developmental disability: Advice for parents of adolescent girlsMMenstruation and developmental disability: Advice for parents of adolescent girlsMenstruation and developmental disability: Advice for parents of adolescent girlsEnglishGenital and reproductivePre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Uterus;Fallopian tubes;OvariesVagina;Uterus;Fallopian tube;OvaryConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZJoley Johnstone, RN;Melanie Ornstein, BSc, MD, MEd, FRCSC000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Suggestions for parents of girls with a developmental disability who have just started or are about to start menstruating. Medical suppression of periods is also discussed.<br></p><h2>Adolescence is a time of change</h2><p>Adolescence is the time when a child starts to become an adult. A child goes through many changes in adolescence when puberty begins. Her body changes. Her feelings and moods change as well.</p><p>Children with developmental disabilities go through the same changes during puberty. But these children also have extra challenges that other children may not have.</p><h2>You can help your daughter cope with menstruation</h2><p>On average, girls usually get their first menstrual period when they are about 12 or 13 years old.</p><p>Some parents worry how their disabled daughter will cope with menstruation. They worry about how she will keep clean, or how she will deal with the bleeding. They worry that she may be in pain or have mood changes.</p><p>Sometimes, parents are concerned about sexuality and consider suppressing menstrual periods to protect against pregnancy.</p><p>How well a girl with a developmental disability copes with menstruation depends on many things. Depending on her level of disability, some girls are able to cope with menstruation and some are not. Give your daughter as much information as she can understand. Some caregivers do not find menstruation as much as an issue as they thought it might be. If it does become difficult for your daughter, there are some things that can be done to help.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Most girls get their first menstrual period when they are about 12 or 13 years old. This includes girls with developmental disabilities.</li> <li>Some girls with developmental disabilities find it hard to cope with their periods.</li> <li>Some parents decide to give their daughter medicine to help her cope.</li> <li>These medicines include hormonal therapy, or birth control.</li> <li>Wait until your daughter has her first period before you decide to give her medicine.</li> <li>Medicines can make a girl's periods lighter and more regular, or make them stop.</li> <li>These medicines can also have some side effects.</li> </ul><h2>Medicines for painful periods</h2><p>Pain medicine can help with period cramps. Medicines called <a href="/article?contentid=62&language=English">non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs)</a> work very well. NSAIDs work best if you use them regularly during the times of pain, rather than only when the pain gets very bad. <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">Ibuprofen​</a> is the cheapest NSAID that is available over the counter (without a prescription). You can buy it in any drugstore.<br></p><p>Sometimes it is hard to know when to give pain medicine, especially if your daughter has trouble communicating. If your daughter is not acting like herself, or behaving strangely, it may be because of pain.</p><p>Sometimes your daughter might need stronger medicine. If NSAIDs​ do not help enough, talk to your child's doctor. To get stronger medicine, you need a prescription. Examples of stronger medicines are Anaprox DS or Naprosyn.</p><p>Birth control pills or other hormone pills can also help decrease painful periods. They are especially helpful if the pain medicine is not enough on its own. Talk to your child's doctor about these pills.</p><h2>Menstruation can be suppressed or stopped all together</h2><p>Sometimes, parents ask doctors if it is possible to suppress menstruation. That is, to stop menstruation or make it happen less often.</p><p>It is possible to suppress menstruation, but there are risks.</p><h3>Wait until your daughter's first period</h3><p>Wait until your daughter gets her first period before you make a decision. Sometimes, girls do not have the problems their parents think they will have.</p><h2>Hormonal therapy is an option</h2><p>Contraceptives are medicines that are used for birth control. They can also decrease menstrual flow, reduce menstrual pain, and increase the time between periods. Contraceptives can be birth control pills, patches, needles or implants.</p><p>These forms of birth control do not protect against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).</p><p>There are different benefits and side effects with each form of contraceptive.</p><h3>The birth control pills or patch</h3><p>The birth control pill is taken once per day. The birth control patch is changed once per week. The pill or the patch can be used in one of two ways:</p><ul><li>In a cycle, starting and stopping each month (cyclically). Once a month, a girl stops taking the medicine for a few days and has a period.</li><li>All the time (continuously). Every two to four months, a girl might stop taking the medicine for a few days and have a period. After a while, she might take the medicine all the time, without breaks. When this happens, she stops having periods.</li></ul><p>These are the benefits of the pill or patch:</p><ul><li>Periods are lighter, shorter, less painful and more regular.</li><li>Skin is healthier, with fewer pimples.</li><li>Less mood changes or a more even mood.</li><li>A girl has less chance of getting cancer of the uterus or ovaries.</li></ul><p>Often, the pill and patch do not have side effects. Or they can have mild side effects, such as these ones:</p><ul><li>headache</li><li>mood changes</li><li>sore breasts or leg cramps</li><li>stomach upset or bloating</li><li>small amounts of vaginal bleeding from time to time</li></ul><p>Girls with some medical conditions cannot use the pill or patch. For example, the pill might not work if your daughter uses a feeding tube. If this is how she is fed, the patch will probably work better for her.</p><p>Talk to your daughter's doctor before you give your daughter any kind of medicine.</p><h3>Depo-provera injection</h3><p>Depo-provera is a hormone injection (needle). It is given every three months.</p><p>These are the benefits of Depo-provera:</p><ul><li>Periods are lighter, shorter and less painful.</li><li>Periods might stop completely after a year.</li></ul><p>Often, Depo-provera does not have side effects. Or it can have mild side effects, such as these ones:</p><ul><li>headache</li><li>mood changes</li><li>weight gain</li><li>small amounts of vaginal bleeding from time to time</li></ul><p>Sometimes, Depo-provera can lead to <a href="/Article?contentid=948&language=English">osteoporosis</a> with long-term use. Osteoporosis​ is a condition where the bones become weaker and less dense. Doctors will test your daughter's bone density before she starts hormone therapy. They will test it again while she is on hormone therapy. This way they can make sure the medicine is not harming her bones. They might also give her vitamins to help protect her from osteoporosis.</p><h3>Mirena IUD with progesterone</h3><p>An intra-uterine system or device (IUD) is a small device that is placed inside the uterus. The IUD contains a hormone called progesterone. From the IUD, a small amount of progesterone slowly enters the body every day.</p><p>The IUD is put in place by a doctor. Your daughter will be asleep during the procedure, or she will be given a medicine called a sedative to make her very relaxed. Once the IUD is in place, it may stay in the uterus for five years.</p><p>The benefit of an IUD is that periods are lighter and less painful.</p><p>The side effects of an IUD can include these ones:</p><ul><li>headache</li><li>mood changes</li><li>weight gain</li><li>small amounts of vaginal bleeding from time to time</li></ul><h2>There is a small chance that hormonal therapy can cause problems after a long time</h2><p>Many women have used hormones for birth control for a long time, and they have been fine. But we do not know everything about what might happen to a woman who takes hormones all her life.</p><p>We think that a woman who takes hormones for a long time has a higher chance of having some health problems. This does not happen often, but you need to know about it. These problems can include weak bones, blood clots, heart disease and breast cancer. </p>
Menstruations et déficience développementale : conseils pour les parents d’adolescentesMMenstruations et déficience développementale : conseils pour les parents d’adolescentesMenstruation and developmental disability: Tips for parents of teensFrenchGenital and reproductivePre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Uterus;Fallopian tubes;OvariesVagina;Uterus;Fallopian tube;OvaryConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZJoley Johnstone, RN;Melanie Ornstein, BSc, MD, MEd, FRCSC000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Suggestions pour les parents de filles atteintes d’une déficience développementale qui viennent d’avoir leurs menstruations ou qui les auront bientôt. On discute aussi de la suppression médicale des menstruations.</p><h2>L’adolescence est une période marquée par le changement</h2><p>L’adolescence est une période de la vie où l’enfant commence à devenir un adulte. Une enfant subit de nombreuses transformations à l’adolescence, au moment où la puberté commence. Son corps change, et ses sentiments et ses humeurs aussi.</p><p>Les enfants atteints d’une déficience développementale vivent les mêmes changements pendant la puberté. Ces enfants doivent affronter des défis additionnels que les autres enfants n’ont pas à gérer.</p><h2>Vous pouvez aider votre enfant à comprendre les menstruations</h2><p>En moyenne, les filles obtiennent leurs premières règles à l’âge de 12 ou 13 ans.</p><p>Certains parents s’inquiètent de la manière dont leur fille handicapée composera avec les menstruations. Ils se demandent comment elle assurera son hygiène personnelle, ou comment elle fera pour comprendre en quoi consistent les saignements. Ils s’inquiètent de la douleur ou de la possibilité des sautes d’humeur. </p><p>Parfois, les parents s’inquiètent de la sexualité de leur enfant et envisagent de mettre fin aux menstruations pour protéger l’enfant contre une grossesse. </p><p>La capacité d’une jeune fille atteinte d’une déficience développementale de composer avec les menstruations dépend de nombreux facteurs. Selon le degré d’incapacité, certaines filles sont capables de gérer les menstruations, et d’autres, non. Donnez à votre fille autant de renseignements que possible pour qu’elle puisse comprendre. Certains soignants finissent par penser que les menstruations ne sont pas un problème aussi important qu’ils ne l’avaient cru. Si la situation devient problématique, cependant, il y a certaines choses que vous pouvez faire. </p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>La plupart des filles ont leurs premières règles à 12 ou 13 ans, y compris les filles qui ont des déficiences développementales.</li><li>Certaines filles avec une déficience développementale trouvent difficile de gérer leurs menstruations.</li><li>Certains parents décident de donner des médicaments à leur fille pour l’aider.</li><li>Ces médicaments comprennent la thérapie hormonale, ou les anovulants.</li><li>Attendez que votre fille ait ses premières menstruations avant de décider de lui donner des médicaments.</li><li>Les médicaments rendent les menstruations plus légères et plus régulières, et peuvent les arrêter.</li><li>Ces médicaments peuvent aussi avoir des effets secondaires.</li></ul><h2>Médicaments pour menstruations douloureuses</h2> <p>Des médicaments contre la douleur peuvent soulager les crampes associées aux menstruations. Les médicaments appelés anti-inflammatoires non stéroïdiens (AINS) fonctionnent très bien. Les AINS sont particulièrement efficaces s’ils sont utilisés régulièrement pendant la période douloureuse au lieu d’uniquement quand la douleur devient très intense. L’ibuprofène (Advil) est l’AINS le moins cher offert en vente libre (sans prescription). Vous pouvez vous en procurer dans toutes les pharmacies. </p> <p>Il est parfois difficile de savoir quand donner des médicaments contre la douleur, surtout si votre fille a du mal à communiquer. Si votre fille n’est pas elle-même ou si elle se comporte étrangement, ce pourrait être attribuable à la douleur. </p> <p>Votre fille pourrait parfois avoir besoin de médicaments plus puissants. Si les AINS ne font pas effet, parlez-en au médecin de votre enfant. Pour obtenir des médicaments plus puissants, il faut une prescription. Anaprox DS ou Naprosyn en sont des exemples.</p> <p>Des contraceptifs oraux ou d’autres médicaments hormonaux peuvent aussi aider à diminuer la douleur. Ils sont particulièrement utiles si les médicaments contre la douleur ne suffisent pas à eux seuls. Discutez de ces médicaments avec le médecin de votre enfant. </p> <h2>Les menstruations peuvent être arrêtées ou supprimées </h2> <p>Parfois, les parents demandent aux médecins s’il est possible de supprimer les menstruations, c’est-à-dire les arrêter ou en diminuer la fréquence. </p> <p>Il est possible de supprimer les menstruations, mais il y a des risques.</p> <h3>Attendez les premières menstruations de votre fille</h3> <p>Attendez que votre fille ait ses premières menstruations avant de prendre une décision. Parfois, les filles n’ont pas les problèmes que leurs parents prévoient. </p> <h2>La thérapie hormonale est une possibilité</h2> <p>Les contraceptifs sont des médicaments qui servent à contrôler les naissances. Ils peuvent aussi diminuer le flux menstruel, réduire la douleur menstruelle et augmenter l’intervalle qui sépare deux menstruations. Les contraceptifs peuvent prendre la forme de pilules, de timbres, d’injections ou d’implants.</p> <p>Ces formes de contraception ne procurent pas de protection contre les maladies transmissibles sexuellement (MTS).</p> <p>Différents avantages et effets secondaires sont rattachés à chaque forme de contraceptif.</p> <h3>Pilules ou timbre contraceptifs</h3> <p>La pilule contraceptive est prise une fois par jour. Le timbre contraceptif est renouvelé chaque semaine. La pilule ou le timbre peuvent être utilisés d’une ou l’autre ce des deux manières : </p> <ul> <li>en un cycle, qui a un début et une fin chaque mois (cyclique). Une fois par mois, la jeune fille cesse de prendre le médicament pendant quelques jours et a ses règles; </li> <li>tout le temps (continue). Tous les deux à quatre mois, la jeune fille peut arrêter de prendre le médicament pendant quelques jours et avoir ses règles. Après un certain temps, elle peut prendre le médicament tout le temps, sans pause. Si elle choisit de prendre le médicament de manière continue, les menstruations cessent. </li> </ul> <p>La pilule ou le timbre a les avantages suivants :</p> <ul> <li>les menstruations sont plus légères, plus courtes, moins douloureuses et plus régulières; </li> <li>la peau devient plus saine, et la jeune fille a moins de boutons; </li> <li>moins de sautes d’humeur, ou une humeur plus stable; </li> <li>la jeune fille a moins de chances de développer un cancer de l’utérus ou des ovaires. </li> </ul> <p>Souvent, la pilule ou le timbre n’ont pas d’effets secondaires, ou ceux-ci sont très légers. En voici des exemples : </p> <ul> <li>maux de tête; </li> <li>sautes d’humeur;</li> <li>seins douloureux ou crampes aux jambes;</li> <li>maux ou ballonnements d’estomac;</li> <li>petites quantités de saignements vaginaux de temps à autre. </li> </ul> <p>Les jeunes filles atteintes de certains troubles médicaux ne peuvent utiliser la pilule ou le timbre. Par exemple, la pilule pourrait ne pas faire effet si votre fille utilise un tube d’alimentation. Si elle est nourrie ainsi, le timbre serait probablement une meilleure solution pour elle. </p> <p>Discutez avec le médecin de votre enfant avant de lui donner tout médicament. </p> <h3>Injection de Depo-provera </h3> <p>Le Depo-provera est une injection (piqure) d’hormones administrée tous les trois mois.</p> <p>Voici les avantages du Depo-provera :</p> <ul> <li>les menstruations sont plus légères, plus courtes et moins douloureuses;</li> <li>les menstruations pourraient arrêter complètement après un an. </li> </ul> <p>Souvent, le Depo-provera n’a pas d’effets secondaires, ou ceux-ci sont très légers. En voici des exemples : </p> <ul> <li>maux de tête; </li> <li>sautes d’humeur;</li> <li>gain pondéral;</li> <li>petites quantités de saignements vaginaux de temps à autre.</li> </ul> <p>Parfois, l’usage à long terme du Depo-provera peut mener à l’ostéoporose. L’ostéoporose est une maladie où les os deviennent faibles et moins denses. Les médecins testeront la densité osseuse de votre fille avant qu’elle ne commence la thérapie hormonale. Ils la testeront de nouveau une fois qu’elle aura commencé la thérapie. De cette manière, ils peuvent déterminer si le médicament endommage les os. Ils pourraient aussi lui donner des vitamines pour la protéger de l’ostéoporose. </p> <h3>DUI Mierena avec progestérone</h3> <p>Un dispositif intra-utérin (DUI) est un petit dispositif placé à l’intérieur de l’utérus. Le DUI contient une hormone appelée progestérone. Une petite quantité de progestérone issue du DUI entre lentement dans l’organisme tous les jours. </p> <p>Le DUI est mis en place par un médecin. Votre fille sera endormie pendant l’intervention, ou encore on lui donnera un médicament appelé sédatif pour qu’elle soit détendue. Une fois que le DUI est en place, il peut rester dans l’utérus pendant cinq ans. </p> <p>Les avantages d’un DUI, c’est que les menstruations sont plus légères et moins douloureuses.</p> <p>Voici les effets secondaires d’un DUI : </p> <ul> <li>mal de tête; </li> <li>sautes d’humeur; </li> <li>gain pondéral;</li> <li>petites quantités de saignements vaginaux de temps à autre. </li> </ul> <h2>Il y a de faibles chances que la thérapie hormonale cause des problèmes à long terme </h2> <p>De nombreuses femmes se servent d’hormones contraceptives pendant une longue période, sans problème, mais nous ne savons pas tout ce qui se pourrait se produire chez une femme qui prend des hormones toute sa vie. </p> <p>Nous pensons qu’une femme qui prend des hormones pendant longtemps peut avoir de plus grandes chances d’avoir des problèmes de santé. Cela ne se produit pas souvent, mais vous devez le savoir. Au nombre de ces problèmes, on peut citer des os affaiblis, des caillots sanguins, des maladies cardiaques et le cancer du sein. </p>

 

 

Menstruation and developmental disability: Advice for parents of adolescent girls300.000000000000Menstruation and developmental disability: Advice for parents of adolescent girlsMenstruation and developmental disability: Advice for parents of adolescent girlsMEnglishGenital and reproductivePre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Uterus;Fallopian tubes;OvariesVagina;Uterus;Fallopian tube;OvaryConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZJoley Johnstone, RN;Melanie Ornstein, BSc, MD, MEd, FRCSC000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Suggestions for parents of girls with a developmental disability who have just started or are about to start menstruating. Medical suppression of periods is also discussed.<br></p><h2>Adolescence is a time of change</h2><p>Adolescence is the time when a child starts to become an adult. A child goes through many changes in adolescence when puberty begins. Her body changes. Her feelings and moods change as well.</p><p>Children with developmental disabilities go through the same changes during puberty. But these children also have extra challenges that other children may not have.</p><h2>You can help your daughter cope with menstruation</h2><p>On average, girls usually get their first menstrual period when they are about 12 or 13 years old.</p><p>Some parents worry how their disabled daughter will cope with menstruation. They worry about how she will keep clean, or how she will deal with the bleeding. They worry that she may be in pain or have mood changes.</p><p>Sometimes, parents are concerned about sexuality and consider suppressing menstrual periods to protect against pregnancy.</p><p>How well a girl with a developmental disability copes with menstruation depends on many things. Depending on her level of disability, some girls are able to cope with menstruation and some are not. Give your daughter as much information as she can understand. Some caregivers do not find menstruation as much as an issue as they thought it might be. If it does become difficult for your daughter, there are some things that can be done to help.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Most girls get their first menstrual period when they are about 12 or 13 years old. This includes girls with developmental disabilities.</li> <li>Some girls with developmental disabilities find it hard to cope with their periods.</li> <li>Some parents decide to give their daughter medicine to help her cope.</li> <li>These medicines include hormonal therapy, or birth control.</li> <li>Wait until your daughter has her first period before you decide to give her medicine.</li> <li>Medicines can make a girl's periods lighter and more regular, or make them stop.</li> <li>These medicines can also have some side effects.</li> </ul><h2>Medicines for painful periods</h2><p>Pain medicine can help with period cramps. Medicines called <a href="/article?contentid=62&language=English">non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs)</a> work very well. NSAIDs work best if you use them regularly during the times of pain, rather than only when the pain gets very bad. <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">Ibuprofen​</a> is the cheapest NSAID that is available over the counter (without a prescription). You can buy it in any drugstore.<br></p><p>Sometimes it is hard to know when to give pain medicine, especially if your daughter has trouble communicating. If your daughter is not acting like herself, or behaving strangely, it may be because of pain.</p><p>Sometimes your daughter might need stronger medicine. If NSAIDs​ do not help enough, talk to your child's doctor. To get stronger medicine, you need a prescription. Examples of stronger medicines are Anaprox DS or Naprosyn.</p><p>Birth control pills or other hormone pills can also help decrease painful periods. They are especially helpful if the pain medicine is not enough on its own. Talk to your child's doctor about these pills.</p><h2>Menstruation can be suppressed or stopped all together</h2><p>Sometimes, parents ask doctors if it is possible to suppress menstruation. That is, to stop menstruation or make it happen less often.</p><p>It is possible to suppress menstruation, but there are risks.</p><h3>Wait until your daughter's first period</h3><p>Wait until your daughter gets her first period before you make a decision. Sometimes, girls do not have the problems their parents think they will have.</p><h2>Hormonal therapy is an option</h2><p>Contraceptives are medicines that are used for birth control. They can also decrease menstrual flow, reduce menstrual pain, and increase the time between periods. Contraceptives can be birth control pills, patches, needles or implants.</p><p>These forms of birth control do not protect against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).</p><p>There are different benefits and side effects with each form of contraceptive.</p><h3>The birth control pills or patch</h3><p>The birth control pill is taken once per day. The birth control patch is changed once per week. The pill or the patch can be used in one of two ways:</p><ul><li>In a cycle, starting and stopping each month (cyclically). Once a month, a girl stops taking the medicine for a few days and has a period.</li><li>All the time (continuously). Every two to four months, a girl might stop taking the medicine for a few days and have a period. After a while, she might take the medicine all the time, without breaks. When this happens, she stops having periods.</li></ul><p>These are the benefits of the pill or patch:</p><ul><li>Periods are lighter, shorter, less painful and more regular.</li><li>Skin is healthier, with fewer pimples.</li><li>Less mood changes or a more even mood.</li><li>A girl has less chance of getting cancer of the uterus or ovaries.</li></ul><p>Often, the pill and patch do not have side effects. Or they can have mild side effects, such as these ones:</p><ul><li>headache</li><li>mood changes</li><li>sore breasts or leg cramps</li><li>stomach upset or bloating</li><li>small amounts of vaginal bleeding from time to time</li></ul><p>Girls with some medical conditions cannot use the pill or patch. For example, the pill might not work if your daughter uses a feeding tube. If this is how she is fed, the patch will probably work better for her.</p><p>Talk to your daughter's doctor before you give your daughter any kind of medicine.</p><h3>Depo-provera injection</h3><p>Depo-provera is a hormone injection (needle). It is given every three months.</p><p>These are the benefits of Depo-provera:</p><ul><li>Periods are lighter, shorter and less painful.</li><li>Periods might stop completely after a year.</li></ul><p>Often, Depo-provera does not have side effects. Or it can have mild side effects, such as these ones:</p><ul><li>headache</li><li>mood changes</li><li>weight gain</li><li>small amounts of vaginal bleeding from time to time</li></ul><p>Sometimes, Depo-provera can lead to <a href="/Article?contentid=948&language=English">osteoporosis</a> with long-term use. Osteoporosis​ is a condition where the bones become weaker and less dense. Doctors will test your daughter's bone density before she starts hormone therapy. They will test it again while she is on hormone therapy. This way they can make sure the medicine is not harming her bones. They might also give her vitamins to help protect her from osteoporosis.</p><h3>Mirena IUD with progesterone</h3><p>An intra-uterine system or device (IUD) is a small device that is placed inside the uterus. The IUD contains a hormone called progesterone. From the IUD, a small amount of progesterone slowly enters the body every day.</p><p>The IUD is put in place by a doctor. Your daughter will be asleep during the procedure, or she will be given a medicine called a sedative to make her very relaxed. Once the IUD is in place, it may stay in the uterus for five years.</p><p>The benefit of an IUD is that periods are lighter and less painful.</p><p>The side effects of an IUD can include these ones:</p><ul><li>headache</li><li>mood changes</li><li>weight gain</li><li>small amounts of vaginal bleeding from time to time</li></ul><h2>There is a small chance that hormonal therapy can cause problems after a long time</h2><p>Many women have used hormones for birth control for a long time, and they have been fine. But we do not know everything about what might happen to a woman who takes hormones all her life.</p><p>We think that a woman who takes hormones for a long time has a higher chance of having some health problems. This does not happen often, but you need to know about it. These problems can include weak bones, blood clots, heart disease and breast cancer. </p><h2>Suggestions for helping your daughter</h2><ul><li>On a calendar, write down when your daughter's periods begin and end. Also write down how heavy they are. Many girls have heavy blood flow. Many girls have irregular periods for the first five years of menstruation. That is, the periods do not come every month, or at the same time every month. Sometimes, irregular periods make daily life hard. If this is the case, ask your child's doctor about medicine that can help.</li><li>Some girls have painful cramps, backaches, headaches or other problems. Medicines can help. Exercise and physical activity also help.</li><li>Pads are cheaper than diapers. If your daughter wears a diaper, put a pad inside the diaper. Change the pad when it is soiled so you do not have to change the diaper as often.</li><li>Shaving pubic hair is not necessary for hygiene reasons. Some parents have their daughter's pubic hair shaved for religious or cultural reasons. This is fine, but it is just as clean to leave the area unshaved.</li><li>Some girls can learn how to care for themselves during their periods. Your daughter might need you to teach her. She might also need time to learn. Be patient.</li></ul><h2>Making the right decisions for your daughter</h2><p>Each child with a developmental disability is unique. How you decide to handle your daughter's menstrual periods depends on many things, including:</p><ul><li>your family's situation</li><li>your daughter's educational and social situation</li><li>the level of your daughter's disability</li><li>if your daughter takes other medications</li><li>your own abilities</li><li>what will be best for your daughter's health and quality of life</li></ul><p>The last point is the most important one. What will give your daughter the best possible quality of life?<br></p>Menstruation and developmental disability: Advice for parents of adolescent girls

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