Sleep problemsSSleep problemsSleep problemsEnglishNANewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years)NANAConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-05T05:00:00ZMark Feldman, MD, FRCPC000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>​Learn about some of the common problems your child may have when sleeping and what you can do to help your child develop healthy sleep habits.</p><h2>What are sleep problems?</h2><p>Sleep problems occur when your child has difficulty settling down to sleep. They can also include small episodes of sleep or sleep interruptions. The constant night interruption can lead to baby irritation and parental fatigue. When your baby has trouble sleeping, it can be a hard time for the entire family. You can make bedtime less problematic and more enjoyable by learning some healthy sleeping tips.</p><h2>Healthy sleep patterns</h2><p>Your doctor may advise you of the average number of hours of sleep your child needs. Still, every child’s sleeping patterns are different. On average, newborns up to 6 months of age sleep 16 hours a day. Some babies sleep as little as 11 hours and some others sleep as much as 20 hours. Older babies (6 months to one year) sleep about 14 hours a day. Toddlers sleep between 10 and 13 hours. Pre-schoolers sleep between 10 and 12 hours.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Sleep problems can lead to baby irritation and parental fatigue.</li><li>Develop a consistent nap and bedtime routine.</li><li>Create a welcoming and appropriate bedroom.</li><li>Slowly decrease the amount of time you spend with your child before they fall asleep.</li></ul>
مشاكل النومممشاكل النومSleeping problemsArabicNANewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years)NANAConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-05T05:00:00ZNA7.0000000000000071.00000000000001107.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>موجز سهل الفهم عن كيف يمكن مساعدة طفلك الرضيع او الطفل الاكبر سنا على تبني عادات النوم الصحي. تساعد النصائح لنوم صحي على جعل الذهاب الى الفراش عملية اكثر سهولة ومتعة لجميع افراد العائلة.</p>
睡眠障碍睡眠障碍Sleeping problemsChineseSimplifiedNANewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years)NANAConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-05T05:00:00Z71.00000000000007.000000000000001107.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z简要概述了如何帮助婴儿或更大的孩子养成健康的睡眠习惯。健康睡眠技巧能够帮助全家人轻松愉快地享受就寝过程。<br>
睡眠障礙睡眠障礙Sleeping ProblemsChineseTraditionalNANewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years)NANAConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-05T05:00:00Z71.00000000000007.000000000000001107.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z簡要概述了如何幫助嬰兒或更大的孩子養成健康的睡眠習慣。健康睡眠技巧能够幫助全家人輕鬆愉快地享受就寢過程。
Troubles du sommeilTTroubles du sommeilSleeping ProblemsFrenchNANewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years)NANAConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-05T05:00:00ZMark Feldman, MD, FRCPC000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez-en davantage sur les troubles courants du sommeil qui peuvent se manifester chez votre enfant et ce que vous pouvez faire pour l’aider à acquérir de bonnes habitudes de sommeil.</p><h2>Que sont les troubles du sommeil?</h2> <p>Les troubles du sommeil se manifestent quand votre enfant a de la difficulté à s'endormir. Ils peuvent aussi comprendre de courts épisodes de sommeil ou des interruptions du sommeil. Une interruption constante du sommeil peut rendre un bébé irritable et engendrer de la fatigue chez les parents. Si votre bébé a de la difficulté à dormir, il peut en résulter des difficultés pour toute la famille. Vous pouvez rendre l’heure du coucher mois problématique et plus agréable en appliquant quelques conseils sur les bonnes habitudes de sommeil.</p> <h2>Bonnes habitudes de sommeil</h2> <p>Votre médecin peut vous renseigner sur le nombre d’heures de sommeil dont votre enfant a besoin en moyenne. Tout de même, chaque enfant a des habitudes de sommeil différentes. En moyenne, les nouveau-nés jusqu’à l’âge de six mois dorment 16 heures par jour. Certains bébés ne dorment que 11 heures tandis que d’autres dorment jusqu'à 20 heures. Les bébés plus âgés (de six mois à un an) dorment environ 14 heures par jour. Les tout-petits dorment entre 10 et 13 heures. Les enfants d’âge préscolaire dorment entre 10 et 12 heures. </p><h2>À reten​ir</h2> <ul> <li>Les troubles du sommeil peuvent causer une irritabilité chez le bébé et de la fatigue chez les parents.</li> <li>En moyenne, les nouveau-nés dorment un total de 16 heures.</li> <li>Jusqu’à un enfant sur trois montre un refus de dormir.</li> <li>Élaborez une routine régulière pour la sieste et l’heure du coucher.</li> <li>Créez un environnement approprié favorable au sommeil.</li> <li>Réduisez lentement le temps que vous passez avec votre enfant avant qu’il ne s’endorme.</li> </ul>
Trastornos del sueñoTTrastornos del sueñoSleeping ProblemsSpanishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2010-03-05T05:00:00Z71.00000000000007.000000000000001107.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p></p>
سونےمیں مشکلاتسسونےمیں مشکلاتSleeping ProblemsUrduNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2010-03-05T05:00:00Z71.00000000000007.000000000000001107.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z
நித்திரை செய்வதில் பிரச்சினைகள்நித்திரை செய்வதில் பிரச்சினைகள்Sleeping ProblemsTamilNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2010-03-05T05:00:00Z71.00000000000007.000000000000001107.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z

 

 

Sleep problems306.000000000000Sleep problemsSleep problemsSEnglishNANewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years)NANAConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-05T05:00:00ZMark Feldman, MD, FRCPC000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>​Learn about some of the common problems your child may have when sleeping and what you can do to help your child develop healthy sleep habits.</p><h2>What are sleep problems?</h2><p>Sleep problems occur when your child has difficulty settling down to sleep. They can also include small episodes of sleep or sleep interruptions. The constant night interruption can lead to baby irritation and parental fatigue. When your baby has trouble sleeping, it can be a hard time for the entire family. You can make bedtime less problematic and more enjoyable by learning some healthy sleeping tips.</p><h2>Healthy sleep patterns</h2><p>Your doctor may advise you of the average number of hours of sleep your child needs. Still, every child’s sleeping patterns are different. On average, newborns up to 6 months of age sleep 16 hours a day. Some babies sleep as little as 11 hours and some others sleep as much as 20 hours. Older babies (6 months to one year) sleep about 14 hours a day. Toddlers sleep between 10 and 13 hours. Pre-schoolers sleep between 10 and 12 hours.</p><h2>Types of sleep problems</h2><h3>Difficulty settling down to sleep</h3><p>It is very common for babies, toddlers and young children to have trouble falling asleep. Up to one in three children show an unwillingness to go to sleep.</p><h3>Separation issues and co-sleeping</h3><p>In many families, parents choose to sleep in the same bed as their babies and small children. The Canadian Paediatric Society <strong>does not recommend </strong>co-sleeping. Some parents say co-sleeping can help in maintaining regular breastfeedings. But it may disrupt the parents’ sleep, cause tension in the parents’ intimate relationship or cause your baby to become dependent on you to fall asleep. There is also an association between co-bedding and crib death (<a href="/Article?contentid=460&language=English">sudden infant death syndrome</a>).</p><h3>Night awakening</h3><p>Night awakenings occur when a child wakes up in the middle of the night and cannot settle back to sleep. Often the child will cry or call out for their parents or get out of bed. This is common. Many parents allow the child to sleep in the parents’ bed for the rest of the night. This may lead to dependency on the parent to resume sleep. The child should be reassured and brought back to his bed. The child eventually learns self-soothing strategies.</p><h2>Nightmares</h2><p>Nightmares are dreams that bring about fear or anxiety. Nightmares are very common. They occur in as many as one in two children. </p><h2>Night terrors</h2><p> <a href="/Article?contentid=305&language=English">Night terrors</a> are different from nightmares. Night terrors are characterized by a child appearing to waken in horror. The child often screams in panic but usually does not remember what led to their feelings of fear. </p><h2>Sleepwalking</h2><p>Sleepwalking occurs in about 15 per cent of all children. It occurs most often in children aged four to 12 years. Sleepwalking children usually walk around the house aimlessly. They appear unco-ordinated, often do not make sense or start urinating in some place other than the toilet. A bell hung on the child’s door or on the front door may provide reassurance that you will hear your child sleep-walking.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Sleep problems can lead to baby irritation and parental fatigue.</li><li>Develop a consistent nap and bedtime routine.</li><li>Create a welcoming and appropriate bedroom.</li><li>Slowly decrease the amount of time you spend with your child before they fall asleep.</li></ul><h2>Healthy sleep habits</h2><p>Newborns and young children seem to fall asleep easily when they are held or rocked. Newborns fall asleep very easily when sucking on a nipple or pacifier.</p><h3>Develop a consistent nap and bedtime routine</h3><p>Children respond well to routine. Your child will likely respond well to a fixed nap and bedtime routine. Naps for toddlers should be, at most, two hours and should end before 4 p.m. </p><p>Your child’s bedtime will depend on their age and energy levels. Bedtime routines can include:</p><ul><li>giving a bath</li><li>putting on pajamas</li><li>offering a breastfeed or bottle</li><li>dimming the lights</li><li>nighttime cuddling, stroking, singing</li><li>storytime</li></ul><p>Afterward you can put the baby in the crib or the young child in bed. You can kiss the child goodnight and leave the room. Maintaining a consistent bedtime routine will help your child settle down more easily. </p><h3>Create a welcoming sleeping environment</h3><p>Keep the room dark and quiet. Nightlights are not recommended. Instead, keep the light on in the hallway with the door ajar. This will allow the child to go to the bathroom without fear of the dark and will allow you to use a closed door as a motivation to get the child back in bed should they begin to use delay tactics to go to bed at night.</p><p>Your baby should sleep on their back, toward the bottom of the crib. When they are old enough to roll from front to back there is no need to reposition them. There should be no blankets or crib bumpers or other soft materials that may block a baby’s breathing. They should wear a sleeper that is warm enough to make a blanket unnecessary.</p><p>When your child becomes aware of separation at bedtime, you may give them a blanket or a stuffed animal to offer a sense of comfort. Do not give these items during early infancy as these may be risk factors for crib death.</p><p>Your baby should learn to fall asleep by themselves. If they were to wake up and find you gone, the whole process of soothing to sleep may be required several times a night.</p><h3>React to infant crying when appropriate</h3><p>Respond to the cries of newborns and babies in their first few months of life. The crying is a way to express a need.</p><p>As for seven- or eight-month old babies, it is entirely normal if they cry before falling asleep.</p><p>It is alright to let your baby cry a little before settling down. However, if your baby has grown accustomed to having you around when falling asleep, you can try to reduce this dependency by gradually lessening your time in the bedroom. One approach is to lay your child down, leave for a few minutes, return and stay until the child sleeps. Every evening, stay out of the room for a little longer. After about five to seven days your baby will learn to sleep alone.</p><h3>Recognize your child’s delaying tactics</h3><p>Once your child understands the bedtime routine, they can manipulate the situation. Toddlers and young children are particularly skillful at prolonging the bedtime routine. They will ask for water, another story or a cuddle. Parents and caregivers should return the child to bed immediately. Warn the child there will be consequences if the behaviour is repeated. Consequences can include closing the door or not offering stories at the next bedtime.</p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/sleeping_problems.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/sleeping_problems.jpgSleep problems

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