Neonatal neurodevelopmental follow-up recommendations: Eight month visitNNeonatal neurodevelopmental follow-up recommendations: Eight month visitNeonatal neurodevelopmental follow-up recommendations: Eight month visitEnglishDevelopmental;NeonatologyBaby (1-12 months)NANANon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-04-05T04:00:00Z​​Jacqueline Jackson, MN, NP-Paediatrics, RN (EC) (original author);​​Andrea Riekstins, MN, NP-Paediatrics, RN (EC);Jane Brettschneider, M. Sc. (A), Reg. CASLPO;Linh Ly, MD, MEd, FRCPC, FAAP;​​Lori Burton, M.Ed., BSc, O.T. Reg (Ont.);​​Lynelle Phillips, MHealth (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Recommendations for babies who have spent time in the NICU or CCCU to help improve neurodevelopment at eight months. </p><p>Talking and playing with babies are two of the most important things parents and caregivers can do to help them develop. There are many ways to encourage development. The recommendations provided are general and not all inclusive. The recommendations provide strategies to help promote gross motor skills, fine motor skills, early language development, and socialization.</p><ul><li>Gross motor skills include big movements such as rolling, crawling, standing or walking.</li><li>Fine motor skills include hand movements such as reach and grasp.</li><li>Early language development includes cooing, babbling, and a baby’s first words.</li></ul><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Babies who have been in the NICU or CCCU may be at risk for developmental issues due to medical problems before delivery, during delivery or after birth.</li><li>Recommendations at eight months focus on continuing tummy time play, developing core strength and crawling, and encouraging verbal communication.</li><li>Parents and caregivers should follow these recommendations to encourage neurodevelopment.</li></ul><h2>Neonatal neurodevelopmental recommendations at eight months</h2><h3>Gross motor: </h3><ul><li>Practice frequent tummy time and floor time to help promote overall strength and motor development. </li><li>Encourage your baby to play in sitting position. Try to sit in front of them (not behind) to encourage flexion and core-strengthening.</li><li>Place toys off to the side to encourage your baby to reach and transition out of sitting.</li><li>Use crawling position for play by putting baby on their knees and then lower their hands down.</li><li>Motivate your baby to crawl by practicing rocking them on all fours.</li><li>Encourage them to reach for toys when on all fours.</li><li>Practice transitions such as: sitting to 4-point (i.e. on hands and knees) and lying to sitting.</li><li>Supervise your baby while they are standing at a supportive surface (e.g. couch, ottoman).</li><li>Avoid standing devices (e.g. Jolly Jumpers and Exersaucers).</li><li>Practice gross motor activities in both directions (i.e. transitions, rolling to the left and right). </li></ul><h3>Fine motor: </h3><ul><li>Introduce finger feeding and cereal play to refine pincer grasp.</li><li>Practice holding two objects and banging at the midline (middle of your baby’s body). </li><li>Provide a variety of objects in different shapes, textures, sizes for exploration with hands.</li><li>For babies with thumbs held across the palm, encourage holding thicker round rattles or squishy toys.</li><li>Handedness (left or right) – encourage use of non-dominant hand by presenting toys, objects, stimulation to non-dominant side while restricting use of preferred hand, if necessary.</li></ul><h3>Communication/Social:</h3><ul><li>Be face to face with your baby and be animated. </li><li>Use single words, repeat what you say and do, and use lots of gestures.</li><li>Watch what your child is doing, wait, listen and respond. Imitate actions and try to keep the interaction going.</li><li>Play vocal turn-taking games (e.g., imitate sounds they make and keep the interaction going).</li><li>Use simple picture books, with real life photos.</li><li>Electronic media use by children younger than two years old is not recommended. This includes phones, television, computers, and tablet devices.</li></ul><h3>Play:</h3><ul><li>Play social communication games (e.g. peek-a-boo, itsy bitsy spider, etc.) and encourage container play (putting objects in and taking out of containers).</li><li>Introduce stacking and simple cause and effect toys and activities.</li><li>Functional play – introduce playing with toys and objects as they were intended to be used.</li><li>Provide opportunities for interaction with other children (e.g., Ontario Early-Years Drop-In Centres, library programs or community groups).</li></ul><h3>Feeding and Growth:</h3><ul><li>Continue regular visits to your family doctor/paediatrician to monitor your child’s growth.</li><li>Progress to thicker pureed consistencies and forked mashed solids with daily opportunities for soft dissolvable pieces. Include a variety of foods from all food groups (e.g., fruits, vegetables, meats, fish, dairies, etc.).</li><li>Present a variety of cubed or chopped foods for finger feeding.</li><li>Avoid juice and other sweetened beverages.</li></ul><h3>Sleep:</h3><ul><li>Establish a regular sleep schedule and bedtime routine. Consider reading to your child as part of routine.</li><li>Practice safe sleep habits: back to sleep on a separate firm flat surface in your room at least for the first six months.</li></ul><p>For more information on neonatal neurodevelopmental recommendations at different ages, please see the links below:</p> <ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3031&language=English">Four month visit​</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3201&language=English">Twelve month visit</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3202&language=English">Eighteen month visit</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3203&language=English">Thirty-six month visit​</a></li></ul><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>For more information on the Neonatal Nevelopmental Follow-Up Clinic at The Hospital for Sick Children, please visit: <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/neonatology/what-we-do/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program%20.html">http://www.sickkids.ca/neonatology/what-we-do/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program%20.html</a></p><h2>Resources</h2><p><a href="http://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/">http://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/</a></p><h2>References</h2><p>Sinai Health Systems Neonatal Follow-Up Clinic recommendations</p><p>Neonatal developmental recommendations have been adapted with permission from Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto.</p>
Recommandations de suivi sur le développement neurologique néonatal : visite à l’âge de huit moisRRecommandations de suivi sur le développement neurologique néonatal : visite à l’âge de huit moisNeonatal neurodevelopmental follow-up recommendations: Eight month visitFrenchDevelopmental;NeonatologyBaby (1-12 months)NANANon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-04-05T04:00:00ZJacqueline Jackson, MN, NP-Paediatrics, RN (EC) (original author);​​Andrea Riekstins, MN, NP-Paediatrics, RN (EC);Jane Brettschneider, M. Sc. (A), Reg. CASLPO;Linh Ly, MD, MEd, FRCPC, FAAP;​​Lori Burton, M.Ed., BSc, O.T. Reg (Ont.);​​Lynelle Phillips, MHealth (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Recommandations pour les bébés qui ont passé du temps à l’UNSI ou à l’UCSI pour aider à améliorer le développement neurologique à huit mois.</p><p>Parler et jouer avec les bébés sont deux des choses les plus importantes que les parents et les soignants peuvent faire pour les aider à se développer. Il existe de nombreuses façons d’encourager le développement. Les recommandations fournies sont générales et non exhaustives. Les recommandations fournissent des stratégies pour aider à promouvoir la motricité globale, la motricité fine, le développement précoce du langage et la socialisation.</p><ul><li>La motricité globale comprend de grands mouvements tels que rouler, ramper, se tenir debout ou marcher.</li><li>La motricité fine comprend des mouvements de la main tels que tendre la main vers des objets et les saisir.</li><li>Le développement précoce du langage comprend le gazouillis, le babillage et les premiers mots d’un bébé.<br></li></ul><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Les bébés qui ont été à l’UNSI ou à l’UCSI peuvent être exposés à des problèmes de développement en raison de problèmes médicaux présents avant l’accouchement, pendant l’accouchement ou après la naissance.</li><li>Les recommandations à l’âge de huit mois priorisent les jeux sur le ventre, le développement de la force du tronc et de l’aptitude à ramper, et la communication verbale.</li><li>Les parents et les soignants devraient suivre ces recommandations pour encourager le développement neurologique.</li></ul><h2>Recommandations sur le développement neurologique néonatal à l’âge de huit mois</h2><h3>Motricité globale :</h3><ul><li>Encouragez votre bébé à jouer régulièrement sur le ventre et au sol pour aider à promouvoir la force globale et le développement moteur.</li><li>Encouragez votre bébé à jouer en position assise. Essayez de vous asseoir devant lui (pas derrière) pour encourager la flexion et le renforcement du tronc.</li><li>Placez les jouets sur le côté pour encourager votre bébé à les attraper et à se sortir de la position assise.</li><li>Utilisez la position rampante pour jouer en mettant le bébé sur ses genoux, puis abaissez ses mains.</li><li>Motivez votre bébé à ramper en le berçant pendant qu’il est à quatre pattes.</li><li>Encouragez-le à attraper des jouets pendant qu’il est à quatre pattes.</li><li>Exercez-vous aux transitions suivantes : de la position assise vers ses quatre points d’appui (c’est-à-dire sur les mains et les genoux) et de la position couchée vers la position assise.</li><li>Surveillez votre bébé pendant qu’il se tient debout sur une surface de soutien (par ex., divan, pouf).</li><li>Évitez les dispositifs destinés à maintenir le bébé en position debout (par ex., produits de type Jolly Jumper et Exersaucer).</li><li>Faites-le s’exercer à des activités motrices globales dans les deux sens (transitions, rouler vers la gauche et vers la droite, etc.)</li></ul><h3>Motricité fine :</h3><ul><li>Introduisez l’alimentation au doigt et le jeu avec des céréales pour affiner la prise en pince.</li><li>Entraînez le bébé à tenir deux objets et à taper sur la ligne médiane (au milieu de son corps).</li><li>Donnez une variété d’objets de différentes formes, textures, tailles pour l’exploration avec les mains.</li><li>Pour les bébés dont les pouces sont tournés vers l’intérieur de la paume, encouragez-les à tenir des hochets ronds plus épais ou des jouets spongieux.</li><li>Prévalence manuelle (gaucherie ou droiterie) : encouragez l’utilisation de la main non dominante en présentant des jouets ou des objets et stimulez le côté non dominant tout en limitant l’utilisation de la main préférée, si nécessaire.</li></ul><h3>Communication et aptitudes sociales :</h3><ul><li>Soyez face à face avec votre bébé et soyez animé.</li><li>Utilisez des mots simples, répétez ce que vous dites et faites, et utilisez beaucoup de gestes. </li><li>Regardez ce que fait votre enfant, attendez, écoutez et répondez. Imitez ses actions et essayez de maintenir l’interaction.</li><li>Jouez à des jeux de tours vocaux (par ex., imitez les sons que fait votre bébé et continuez l’interaction).</li><li>Utilisez des livres d’images simples comportant des photos de la vie réelle.</li><li>L’utilisation des médias électroniques (téléphone, télévision, ordinateur, tablette) par des enfants de moins de deux ans n’est pas recommandée.</li></ul><h3>Jeu :</h3><ul><li>Jouez à des jeux de communication sociale (par ex., coucou, pomme de reinette, etc.) et encouragez le jeu avec des contenants (en plaçant des objets dans les contenants et en les retirant).</li><li>Introduisez les blocs à empiler ainsi que les jouets et les activités fondés sur un simple mécanisme de cause à effet.</li><li>Jeu fonctionnel : montrez-lui à jouer avec des objets et ses jouets en respectant le but dans lequel ils ont été conçus.</li><li>Offrez des possibilités d’interaction avec d’autres enfants (p. ex., centres de la petite enfance de l’Ontario, programmes de bibliothèque ou groupes communautaires).</li></ul><h3>Alimentation et croissance :</h3><ul><li>Continuez à visiter régulièrement votre médecin de famille ou votre pédiatre pour surveiller la croissance de votre enfant.</li><li>Passez à des consistances plus épaisses en purée et à des solides écrasés à la fourchette tout en continuant de lui offrir chaque jour des aliments mous et solubles. Incluez une variété d’aliments de tous les groupes alimentaires (par ex., les fruits, les légumes, les viandes, les poissons, les produits laitiers, etc.)</li><li>Présentez une variété d’aliments en cubes ou hachés pour l’alimentation au doigt.</li><li>Évitez les jus et autres boissons sucrées.</li></ul><h3>Sommeil :</h3><ul><li>Établissez un horaire de sommeil régulier et une routine au coucher. Pensez à lire à votre enfant dans le cadre de la routine.</li><li>Adoptez de bonnes habitudes de sommeil : couchez le bébé sur une surface plane et ferme dans votre chambre à coucher, au moins pendant les six premiers mois.</li></ul><p>Pour plus d’informations sur les recommandations sur le développement neurologique à différents âges, veuillez cliquer sur les liens ci-dessous :</p> <ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3031&language=French">Visite à l’âge de quatre mois</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3201&language=French">Visite à l’âge de douze mois</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3202&language=French">Visite à l’âge de dix-huit mois</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3203&language=French">Visite à l’âge de trente-six mois</a><br></li></ul><h2>À l’hôpital SickKids</h2><p>Pour plus de renseignements sur la clinique de suivi néonatal de l’Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids), veuillez visiter <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/neonatology/what-we-do/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program%20.html">http://www.sickkids.ca/neonatology/what-we-do/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program%20.html</a>.</p><h2>Ressources</h2><p><a href="http://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/">http://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/</a></p><h2>Références</h2><p>Recommandations de la Clinique de suivi néonatal de Sinai Health Systems</p><p>Les recommandations sur le développement néonatal ont été adaptées avec la permission de l’Hôpital Mount Sinai de Toronto.</p>

 

 

Neonatal neurodevelopmental follow-up recommendations: Eight month visit3200.00000000000Neonatal neurodevelopmental follow-up recommendations: Eight month visitNeonatal neurodevelopmental follow-up recommendations: Eight month visitNEnglishDevelopmental;NeonatologyBaby (1-12 months)NANANon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-04-05T04:00:00Z​​Jacqueline Jackson, MN, NP-Paediatrics, RN (EC) (original author);​​Andrea Riekstins, MN, NP-Paediatrics, RN (EC);Jane Brettschneider, M. Sc. (A), Reg. CASLPO;Linh Ly, MD, MEd, FRCPC, FAAP;​​Lori Burton, M.Ed., BSc, O.T. Reg (Ont.);​​Lynelle Phillips, MHealth (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Recommendations for babies who have spent time in the NICU or CCCU to help improve neurodevelopment at eight months. </p><p>Talking and playing with babies are two of the most important things parents and caregivers can do to help them develop. There are many ways to encourage development. The recommendations provided are general and not all inclusive. The recommendations provide strategies to help promote gross motor skills, fine motor skills, early language development, and socialization.</p><ul><li>Gross motor skills include big movements such as rolling, crawling, standing or walking.</li><li>Fine motor skills include hand movements such as reach and grasp.</li><li>Early language development includes cooing, babbling, and a baby’s first words.</li></ul><h2>What is the Neonatal Neurodevelopmental Follow-Up Clinic?</h2><p>The Neonatal Neurodevelopmental Follow-Up Clinic is a specialized clinic for children who had medical complications related to, or immediately after, their birth. This clinic assesses gross-motor skills, fine-motor skills, social development, language and learning ability at specific ages to determine if the child is developing normally.</p> <p>The majority of patients seen in the Neonatal Neurodevelopmental Follow-Up Clinic are referred from a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) or a Cardiac Critical Care Unit (CCCU). Babies who have been admitted to the NICU or CCCU may be at risk for developmental issues due to medical problems before delivery, during delivery or after birth. These recommendations may be used to encourage development in babies who have not spent time in the NICU or CCCU, but still require care in the Neonatal Neurodevelopmental Follow-Up Clinic. Talk to your child’s doctor to see if you should be following these guidelines with your baby. </p><p>Babies and toddlers are assessed at specific ages in the clinic and given recommendations that parents and caregivers can refer to at home to help their baby achieve their maximum potential. These recommendations are for eight months corrected age, as most of the babies followed in the clinic were premature at birth.</p><p>If you are concerned about your baby’s development, speak with your primary healthcare provider.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Babies who have been in the NICU or CCCU may be at risk for developmental issues due to medical problems before delivery, during delivery or after birth.</li><li>Recommendations at eight months focus on continuing tummy time play, developing core strength and crawling, and encouraging verbal communication.</li><li>Parents and caregivers should follow these recommendations to encourage neurodevelopment.</li></ul><h2>Neonatal neurodevelopmental recommendations at eight months</h2><h3>Gross motor: </h3><ul><li>Practice frequent tummy time and floor time to help promote overall strength and motor development. </li><li>Encourage your baby to play in sitting position. Try to sit in front of them (not behind) to encourage flexion and core-strengthening.</li><li>Place toys off to the side to encourage your baby to reach and transition out of sitting.</li><li>Use crawling position for play by putting baby on their knees and then lower their hands down.</li><li>Motivate your baby to crawl by practicing rocking them on all fours.</li><li>Encourage them to reach for toys when on all fours.</li><li>Practice transitions such as: sitting to 4-point (i.e. on hands and knees) and lying to sitting.</li><li>Supervise your baby while they are standing at a supportive surface (e.g. couch, ottoman).</li><li>Avoid standing devices (e.g. Jolly Jumpers and Exersaucers).</li><li>Practice gross motor activities in both directions (i.e. transitions, rolling to the left and right). </li></ul><h3>Fine motor: </h3><ul><li>Introduce finger feeding and cereal play to refine pincer grasp.</li><li>Practice holding two objects and banging at the midline (middle of your baby’s body). </li><li>Provide a variety of objects in different shapes, textures, sizes for exploration with hands.</li><li>For babies with thumbs held across the palm, encourage holding thicker round rattles or squishy toys.</li><li>Handedness (left or right) – encourage use of non-dominant hand by presenting toys, objects, stimulation to non-dominant side while restricting use of preferred hand, if necessary.</li></ul><h3>Communication/Social:</h3><ul><li>Be face to face with your baby and be animated. </li><li>Use single words, repeat what you say and do, and use lots of gestures.</li><li>Watch what your child is doing, wait, listen and respond. Imitate actions and try to keep the interaction going.</li><li>Play vocal turn-taking games (e.g., imitate sounds they make and keep the interaction going).</li><li>Use simple picture books, with real life photos.</li><li>Electronic media use by children younger than two years old is not recommended. This includes phones, television, computers, and tablet devices.</li></ul><h3>Play:</h3><ul><li>Play social communication games (e.g. peek-a-boo, itsy bitsy spider, etc.) and encourage container play (putting objects in and taking out of containers).</li><li>Introduce stacking and simple cause and effect toys and activities.</li><li>Functional play – introduce playing with toys and objects as they were intended to be used.</li><li>Provide opportunities for interaction with other children (e.g., Ontario Early-Years Drop-In Centres, library programs or community groups).</li></ul><h3>Feeding and Growth:</h3><ul><li>Continue regular visits to your family doctor/paediatrician to monitor your child’s growth.</li><li>Progress to thicker pureed consistencies and forked mashed solids with daily opportunities for soft dissolvable pieces. Include a variety of foods from all food groups (e.g., fruits, vegetables, meats, fish, dairies, etc.).</li><li>Present a variety of cubed or chopped foods for finger feeding.</li><li>Avoid juice and other sweetened beverages.</li></ul><h3>Sleep:</h3><ul><li>Establish a regular sleep schedule and bedtime routine. Consider reading to your child as part of routine.</li><li>Practice safe sleep habits: back to sleep on a separate firm flat surface in your room at least for the first six months.</li></ul><p>For more information on neonatal neurodevelopmental recommendations at different ages, please see the links below:</p> <ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3031&language=English">Four month visit​</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3201&language=English">Twelve month visit</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3202&language=English">Eighteen month visit</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3203&language=English">Thirty-six month visit​</a></li></ul><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>For more information on the Neonatal Nevelopmental Follow-Up Clinic at The Hospital for Sick Children, please visit: <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/neonatology/what-we-do/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program%20.html">http://www.sickkids.ca/neonatology/what-we-do/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program%20.html</a></p><h2>Resources</h2><p><a href="http://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/">http://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/</a></p><h2>References</h2><p>Sinai Health Systems Neonatal Follow-Up Clinic recommendations</p><p>Neonatal developmental recommendations have been adapted with permission from Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Neonatal%20neurodevelopmental_8.jpgNeonatal neurodevelopmental follow-up recommendations: Eight month visitFalse

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