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Neonatal neurodevelopmental follow-up recommendations: 36 month visitNNeonatal neurodevelopmental follow-up recommendations: 36 month visitNeonatal neurodevelopmental follow-up recommendations: 36 month visitEnglishDevelopmental;NeonatologyPreschooler (2-4 years)NANANon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-04-05T04:00:00ZJacqueline Jackson, MN, NP-Paediatrics, RN (EC) (original author);​​Andrea Riekstins, MN, NP-Paediatrics, RN (EC);Jane Brettschneider, M. Sc. (A), Reg. CASLPO;Linh Ly, MD, MEd, FRCPC, FAAP;​​Lori Burton, M.Ed., BSc, O.T. Reg (Ont.);​​Lynelle Phillips, MHealth (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Recommendations to encourage neurodevelopment in babies at 36 months old who are patients in the neonatal developmental follow-up clinic.</p><p>Talking and playing with babies are two of the most important things parents and caregivers can do to help them develop. There are many ways to encourage development. The recommendations provided are general and not all inclusive. The recommendations provide strategies to help promote gross motor skills, fine motor skills, early language development, and socialization.</p><ul><li>Gross motor skills include big movements such as rolling, crawling, standing or walking.</li><li>Fine motor skills include hand movements such as reach and grasp.</li><li>Early language development includes cooing, babbling, and a baby’s first words.</li></ul><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Babies who have been in the NICU or CCCU may be at risk for developmental issues due to medical problems before delivery, during delivery or after birth.</li><li>Recommendations at 36 months focus on encouraging different types of movement, creativity, and cognitive development.</li><li>Parents and caregivers should follow these recommendations to encourage neurodevelopment.</li></ul><h2>Neonatal neurodevelopmental recommendations at 36 months</h2><h3>Gross motor</h3><ul><li>Practice jumping and different types of obstacle courses that involve different terrain and places to climb.</li><li>Practice riding toys with pedals (such as tricycles).</li><li>Encourage your child to practice going up and down stairs in a safe manner.</li></ul><h3>Fine motor</h3><ul><li>Let your child play with a variety of materials (sand, clay, playdough, paint, chalk) to make shapes or creative figures. Have your child roll playdough into balls or create ‘snakes.’</li><li>Encourage your child to help with dressing themselves. Have them practice doing up zippers and larger buttons on a shirt.</li><li>Encourage your child to use crayons, pencils and markers on paper to make lines and circles.</li><li>Use safety scissors to practice cutting paper.</li></ul><h3>Communication/Social</h3><ul><li>When playing with your child, point out ideas like big/small, same/different, and faster/slower.</li><li>Provide structure and routine, which builds children’s confidence.</li><li>Allow opportunities for increasing independence, such as self-dressing, washing hands, tidying toys.</li><li>Have your child listen to and follow directions (“First, get your coat, then put it on, then get your boots”).</li><li>Play games that involve turn taking, cooperation, patience and following simple rules. Some examples are board games, tag, London Bridge, and Ring around the Rosie. Play Simon Says to help your child listen, remember, follow directions and take turns--Let your child be “Simon”, too!</li><li>Continue to read with your child and talk about the story and pictures. Let your child turn pages and say the words to familiar stories and rhymes.</li><li>While reading, talk about the characters and ask your child questions about the story, encouraging your child to predict what is going to happen and talking about what did happen, commenting on how the characters feel and how we know how they might feel.</li></ul><h3>Play/Cognitive development</h3><ul><li>Functional play – continue playing with toys/objects as they were intended to be used.</li><li>Encourage pretend play (e.g. feeding a doll or farm animals) and role-playing (e.g. play doctor).</li><li>Sorting and matching small objects, pictures and toys will help your child learn concepts like size, shape, colour, and number. </li><li>Large floor jigsaw puzzles; take turns putting the puzzle together; problem-solve as to where pieces go; talk about it; ask “5 W” questions.</li><li>Charades (put pictures into a grab bag) and follow the leader games are great for following directions, guessing, asking/answering questions and visual spatial development. Visual spatial development is important in developing skills such as drawing, puzzles, mazes and other tasks that require fine motor skills and body awareness.</li><li>Attendance at structured play groups, activities and daycare will provide opportunities for interaction with peers and assist with development of routines, socialization, self-help abilities and ongoing language development.</li><li>Electronic media use by children under the age of four years is discouraged. Children aged 2-4 should have less than one hour a day of screen time. </li><li>Encourage daily, unstructured and structured playtime, and read to your child daily to promote the developing brain.</li></ul><h3>Other</h3><ul><li>Continue regular visits to family doctor/pediatrician to monitor growth.</li><li>Set a timer for two minutes while your child brushes their teeth. You can create a teeth brushing song together.</li><li>Maintain a regular sleep schedule for your child and let them fall asleep independently.</li></ul><p>For more information on neonatal neurodevelopmental recommendations at different ages, please see the links below:</p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3031&language=English">Four month visit​</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3200&language=English">Eight month visit</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3201&language=English">Twelve month visit</a><br></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3202&language=English">Eighteen month visit​</a></li></ul><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>For more information on the Neonatal Nevelopmental Follow-Up Clinic at The Hospital for Sick Children, please visit: <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/neonatology/what-we-do/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program%20.html">http://www.sickkids.ca/neonatology/what-we-do/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program%20.html</a></p><h2>Resources</h2><p> <a href="http://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/">http://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/</a></p><h2>References</h2><p>Sinai Health Systems Neonatal Follow-Up Clinic recommendations</p><p>Neonatal developmental recommendations have been adapted with permission from Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto.</p>
Recommandations de suivi sur le développement neurologique néonatal : visite de l’âge de 36 moisRRecommandations de suivi sur le développement neurologique néonatal : visite de l’âge de 36 moisNeonatal neurodevelopmental follow-up recommendations: 36 month visitFrenchDevelopmental;NeonatologyPreschooler (2-4 years)NANANon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-04-05T04:00:00ZJacqueline Jackson, MN, NP-Paediatrics, RN (EC) (original author);​​Andrea Riekstins, MN, NP-Paediatrics, RN (EC);Jane Brettschneider, M. Sc. (A), Reg. CASLPO;Linh Ly, MD, MEd, FRCPC, FAAP;​​Lori Burton, M.Ed., BSc, O.T. Reg (Ont.);​​Lynelle Phillips, MHealth (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Recommandations pour encourager le neurodéveloppement chez les bébés de 36 mois qui ont passé du temps dans la clinique de néonatologie.</p><p>Parler et jouer avec les bébés sont deux des choses les plus importantes que les parents et les soignants peuvent faire pour les aider à se développer. Il existe de nombreuses façons d’encourager le développement. Les recommandations fournies sont générales et non exhaustives. Les recommandations fournissent des stratégies pour aider à promouvoir la motricité globale, la motricité fine, le développement précoce du langage et la socialisation.</p><ul><li>La motricité globale comprend de grands mouvements tels que rouler, ramper, se tenir debout ou marcher.</li><li>La motricité fine comprend des mouvements de la main tels que tendre la main vers des objets et les saisir.</li><li>Le développement précoce du langage comprend le gazouillis, le babillage et les premiers mots d’un bébé.</li></ul><h2>À retenir </h2><ul><li>Les bébés qui ont été à l’UNSI ou à l’UCSI peuvent être exposés à des problèmes de développement en raison de problèmes médicaux présents avant l’accouchement, pendant l’accouchement ou après la naissance.</li><li>Les recommandations à 18 mois se concentrent sur la marche et le jeu structurel et fonctionnel, et encouragent le développement de la parole.</li><li>Les parents et les soignants devraient suivre ces recommandations pour encourager le développement neurologique.</li></ul><h2>Recommandations sur le développement neurologique néonatal de l’âge de 36 mois</h2><h3>Motricité globale</h3><ul><li>Exercez l’enfant à sauter et à faire différents types de courses à obstacles qui impliquent des terrains et des lieux d’escalade variés.</li><li>Encouragez l’utilisation des jouets à enfourcher avec des pédales (comme les tricycles).</li><li>Encouragez votre enfant à monter et à descendre l’escalier de façon sécuritaire.</li></ul><h3>Motricité fine</h3><ul><li>Laissez votre enfant jouer avec une variété de matériaux (sable, argile, pâte à modeler, peinture, craie) pour lui permettre de créer des formes ou des figures créatives. Demandez-lui de faire des boules ou de créer des « serpents » avec de la pâte à modeler.</li><li>Encouragez votre enfant à s’habiller. Demandez-lui de s’exercer à remonter des fermetures à glissière et à faire ou à défaire des boutons plus gros sur une chemise.</li><li>Encouragez votre enfant à tracer des lignes et des cercles sur du papier à l’aide de pastels, de crayons et de marqueurs.</li><li>Utilisez des ciseaux de sécurité pour entraîner l’enfant à couper du papier.</li></ul><h3>Communication et aptitudes sociales</h3><ul><li>Lorsque vous jouez avec votre enfant, utilisez des adjectifs comme grand et petit, pareil et différent, et vite et lent.</li><li>Établissez une structure et une routine, ce qui renforce la confiance des enfants.</li><li>Permettez d’accroître l’autonomie, comme s’habiller lui-même, se laver les mains, ranger ses jouets.</li><li>Demandez à votre enfant d’écouter et de suivre les instructions (« D’abord, prends ton manteau, ensuite mets-le, puis prends tes bottes »).</li><li>Jouez à des jeux qui impliquent d’attendre son tour, de coopérer, de faire preuve de patience et de suivre des règles simples. En voici des exemples : les jeux de société, le chat perché (la tague), les comptines et les poèmes. Jouez à « Jean dit » pour apprendre à votre enfant à écouter, à se souvenir, à suivre les instructions et à attendre son tour. Laissez-le être « Jean » lui aussi!</li><li>Continuez à lire avec votre enfant et parlez de l’histoire et des images. Laissez-le tourner les pages et dire les mots des histoires familières et des comptines.</li><li>Pendant la lecture, parlez des personnages, posez à votre enfant des questions sur l’histoire, encouragez-le à prédire ce qui va se passer et à parler de ce qui s’est passé, à commenter les sentiments des personnages et à expliquer comment nous savons ce qu’ils peuvent ressentir.</li></ul><h3>Jeux et développement cognitif</h3><ul><li>Jeu fonctionnel : qu’il continue de jouer avec des objets et ses jouets en respectant le but dans lequel ils ont été conçus.</li><li>Encouragez le jeu de simulation (par ex., nourrir une poupée ou des animaux de ferme) et le jeu de rôle (par ex., jouer au docteur).</li><li>Trier et assortir de petits objets, des images et des jouets aidera votre enfant à apprendre des concepts comme la taille, la forme, la couleur et le nombre.</li><li>Grands casse-têtes de plancher : à tour de rôle, assemblez le casse-tête, tentez de savoir où vont les pièces, verbalisez le problème et posez les 5 questions (qui, quoi, quand, où, pourquoi).</li><li>Les devinettes (mettez des photos dans un sac fourre-tout) et les jeux réalisés à la file indienne sont parfaits pour suivre les directives, deviner, poser des questions, y répondre, et améliorer ses capacités visuelles et spatiales. Le développement visuel et spatial est important dans l’acquisition d’aptitudes telles que le dessin, la résolution de casse-têtes et de labyrinthes, et d’autres tâches qui requièrent de bonnes motricité fine et conscience corporelle.</li><li>La participation à des groupes de jeu structurés, à des activités et à des services de garde offrira des occasions d’interaction avec les pairs et aidera à l’adoption de routines, à la socialisation, aux capacités d’auto-assistance et au développement continu du langage.</li><li>L’utilisation de médias électroniques par les enfants de moins de quatre ans est déconseillée. Les enfants de 2 à 4 ans devraient passer moins d’une heure par jour devant l’écran.</li><li>Encouragez quotidiennement des jeux non structurés ou structurés, et lisez à votre enfant pour favoriser le développement du cerveau.</li></ul><h3>Autre</h3><ul><li>Continuez à visiter régulièrement votre médecin de famille ou votre pédiatre pour surveiller la croissance. </li><li>Réglez le chronomètre à deux minutes pendant que votre enfant se brosse les dents. Vous pouvez créer une chanson de brossage des dents ensemble.</li><li>Maintenez un horaire de sommeil régulier pour votre enfant et laissez-le s’endormir de façon autonome.</li></ul><p>Pour plus d’informations sur les recommandations sur le développement neurologique à différents âges, veuillez cliquer sur les liens ci-dessous :</p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3031&language=French">Visite à l’âge de quatre mois</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3200&language=French">Visite à l’âge de huit mois</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3201&language=French">Visite à l’âge de douze mois</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3202&language=French">Visite à l’âge de dix-huit mois</a></li></ul><h2>À l’hôpital SickKids</h2><p>Pour plus de renseignements sur la clinique de suivi néonatal de l’Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids), veuillez visiter <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/neonatology/what-we-do/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program%20.html">http://www.sickkids.ca/neonatology/what-we-do/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program%20.html</a>.</p><h2>Ressources</h2><p> <a href="http://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/">http://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/</a></p><h2>Références</h2><p>Recommandations de la Clinique de suivi néonatal de Sinai Health Systems</p><p>Les recommandations sur le développement néonatal ont été adaptées avec la permission de l’Hôpital Mount Sinai de Toronto.</p>

 

 

Neonatal neurodevelopmental follow-up recommendations: 36 month visit3203.00000000000Neonatal neurodevelopmental follow-up recommendations: 36 month visitNeonatal neurodevelopmental follow-up recommendations: 36 month visitNEnglishDevelopmental;NeonatologyPreschooler (2-4 years)NANANon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-04-05T04:00:00ZJacqueline Jackson, MN, NP-Paediatrics, RN (EC) (original author);​​Andrea Riekstins, MN, NP-Paediatrics, RN (EC);Jane Brettschneider, M. Sc. (A), Reg. CASLPO;Linh Ly, MD, MEd, FRCPC, FAAP;​​Lori Burton, M.Ed., BSc, O.T. Reg (Ont.);​​Lynelle Phillips, MHealth (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Recommendations to encourage neurodevelopment in babies at 36 months old who are patients in the neonatal developmental follow-up clinic.</p><p>Talking and playing with babies are two of the most important things parents and caregivers can do to help them develop. There are many ways to encourage development. The recommendations provided are general and not all inclusive. The recommendations provide strategies to help promote gross motor skills, fine motor skills, early language development, and socialization.</p><ul><li>Gross motor skills include big movements such as rolling, crawling, standing or walking.</li><li>Fine motor skills include hand movements such as reach and grasp.</li><li>Early language development includes cooing, babbling, and a baby’s first words.</li></ul><h2>What is the Neonatal Neurodevelopmental Follow-Up Clinic?</h2><p>The Neonatal Neurodevelopmental Follow-Up Clinic is a specialized clinic for children who had medical complications related to, or immediately after, their birth. This clinic assesses gross-motor skills, fine-motor skills, social development, language and learning ability at specific ages to determine if the child is developing normally.</p><p>The majority of patients seen in the Neonatal Neurodevelopmental Follow-Up Clinic are referred from a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) or a Cardiac Critical Care Unit (CCCU). Babies who have been admitted to the NICU or CCCU may be at risk for developmental issues due to medical problems before delivery, during delivery or after birth. These recommendations may be used to encourage development in babies who have not spent time in the NICU or CCCU, but still require care in the Neonatal Neurodevelopmental Follow-Up Clinic. Talk to your child’s doctor to see if you should be following these guidelines with your baby. </p><p>Babies and toddlers are assessed at specific ages in the clinic and given recommendations that parents and caregivers can refer to at home to help their baby achieve their maximum potential. These recommendations are for 36 months corrected age, as most of the babies followed in the clinic were premature at birth.</p><p>If you are concerned about your baby’s development, speak with your primary healthcare provider.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Babies who have been in the NICU or CCCU may be at risk for developmental issues due to medical problems before delivery, during delivery or after birth.</li><li>Recommendations at 36 months focus on encouraging different types of movement, creativity, and cognitive development.</li><li>Parents and caregivers should follow these recommendations to encourage neurodevelopment.</li></ul><h2>Neonatal neurodevelopmental recommendations at 36 months</h2><h3>Gross motor</h3><ul><li>Practice jumping and different types of obstacle courses that involve different terrain and places to climb.</li><li>Practice riding toys with pedals (such as tricycles).</li><li>Encourage your child to practice going up and down stairs in a safe manner.</li></ul><h3>Fine motor</h3><ul><li>Let your child play with a variety of materials (sand, clay, playdough, paint, chalk) to make shapes or creative figures. Have your child roll playdough into balls or create ‘snakes.’</li><li>Encourage your child to help with dressing themselves. Have them practice doing up zippers and larger buttons on a shirt.</li><li>Encourage your child to use crayons, pencils and markers on paper to make lines and circles.</li><li>Use safety scissors to practice cutting paper.</li></ul><h3>Communication/Social</h3><ul><li>When playing with your child, point out ideas like big/small, same/different, and faster/slower.</li><li>Provide structure and routine, which builds children’s confidence.</li><li>Allow opportunities for increasing independence, such as self-dressing, washing hands, tidying toys.</li><li>Have your child listen to and follow directions (“First, get your coat, then put it on, then get your boots”).</li><li>Play games that involve turn taking, cooperation, patience and following simple rules. Some examples are board games, tag, London Bridge, and Ring around the Rosie. Play Simon Says to help your child listen, remember, follow directions and take turns--Let your child be “Simon”, too!</li><li>Continue to read with your child and talk about the story and pictures. Let your child turn pages and say the words to familiar stories and rhymes.</li><li>While reading, talk about the characters and ask your child questions about the story, encouraging your child to predict what is going to happen and talking about what did happen, commenting on how the characters feel and how we know how they might feel.</li></ul><h3>Play/Cognitive development</h3><ul><li>Functional play – continue playing with toys/objects as they were intended to be used.</li><li>Encourage pretend play (e.g. feeding a doll or farm animals) and role-playing (e.g. play doctor).</li><li>Sorting and matching small objects, pictures and toys will help your child learn concepts like size, shape, colour, and number. </li><li>Large floor jigsaw puzzles; take turns putting the puzzle together; problem-solve as to where pieces go; talk about it; ask “5 W” questions.</li><li>Charades (put pictures into a grab bag) and follow the leader games are great for following directions, guessing, asking/answering questions and visual spatial development. Visual spatial development is important in developing skills such as drawing, puzzles, mazes and other tasks that require fine motor skills and body awareness.</li><li>Attendance at structured play groups, activities and daycare will provide opportunities for interaction with peers and assist with development of routines, socialization, self-help abilities and ongoing language development.</li><li>Electronic media use by children under the age of four years is discouraged. Children aged 2-4 should have less than one hour a day of screen time. </li><li>Encourage daily, unstructured and structured playtime, and read to your child daily to promote the developing brain.</li></ul><h3>Other</h3><ul><li>Continue regular visits to family doctor/pediatrician to monitor growth.</li><li>Set a timer for two minutes while your child brushes their teeth. You can create a teeth brushing song together.</li><li>Maintain a regular sleep schedule for your child and let them fall asleep independently.</li></ul><p>For more information on neonatal neurodevelopmental recommendations at different ages, please see the links below:</p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3031&language=English">Four month visit​</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3200&language=English">Eight month visit</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3201&language=English">Twelve month visit</a><br></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3202&language=English">Eighteen month visit​</a></li></ul><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>For more information on the Neonatal Nevelopmental Follow-Up Clinic at The Hospital for Sick Children, please visit: <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/neonatology/what-we-do/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program%20.html">http://www.sickkids.ca/neonatology/what-we-do/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program/neonatal-developmental-follow-up-program%20.html</a></p><h2>Resources</h2><p> <a href="http://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/">http://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/</a></p><h2>References</h2><p>Sinai Health Systems Neonatal Follow-Up Clinic recommendations</p><p>Neonatal developmental recommendations have been adapted with permission from Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Neonatal%20neurodevelopmental_36.jpgNeonatal neurodevelopmental follow-up recommendations: 36 month visitFalse

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