AboutKidsHealth

 

 

Safe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving capsule solutionsSSafe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving capsule solutionsSafe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving capsule solutionsEnglishPharmacyNewborn (0-28 days);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANADrug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-10-22T04:00:00Z7.7000000000000063.90000000000001467.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>A guide on dissolving and giving a portion of a hazardous medicine capsule safely.</p><p>If your child is taking only a portion of the capsule, you will need to mix it with water first and give only a specific amount to your child.</p><p>If your child is taking the entire capsule and the contents need to be mixed with liquid or food, see the information on Safe Handling of hazardous medicines at home: Mixing capsules with liquid or food.</p><h2>What is hazardous medicine?</h2><p>Hazardous medicines are used to treat a variety of medical conditions. For example, chemotherapy is used to treat cancer, and immunosuppressants are used to prevent organ rejection after a transplant.</p><p>Hazardous medicine can damage healthy cells. Anyone handling hazardous medicine should keep themselves protected.</p><p>Although the risk of harm from handling hazardous medicine is small, it is a good idea to avoid exposure. This includes not tasting your child’s medicine. If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, it is best to avoid contact with hazardous medicine. If possible have someone else prepare and give your child their capsules.<br></p> <div class="asset-video"><p></p> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/XvSHHvLBpj8">frameborder=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;0&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;</iframe>  <br> <p></p>For more videos on how to safely handle hazardous medicines, please view the <a href="https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjJtOP3StIuWBtC0ID5BCbZCMVHJvTcdr">Safe Handling</a> playlist.<br></div> <br> <p></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A gown, mask and gloves offer protection when handling hazardous medicine.</li><li>You will need to prepare the dose inside a plastic bag to minimize exposure.</li><li>Room temperature water and a dissolve-and-dose device is used to make the solution.</li></ul><h2>Giving the medicine</h2><ol><li>Pour 10 mL of room-temperature water into a small medicine cup.</li><li>To prepare the syringe, remove the cap and push the plunger all the way in.</li><li>Open the medicine bottle and use tweezers to remove the capsule. Place the capsule onto the covered work surface. Put the lid back on the medicine bottle.</li><li>To minimize the amount of medicine that gets into the air, you will prepare the dose inside the plastic bag. Put the capsule, oral syringe, medicine cup filled with water, and the dissolve-and-dose device inside the clear plastic bag.</li><li>With your hands inside the bag, unscrew the lid of the dissolve-and-dose device.</li> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/chemo_at_home_capsules_pour_into_dissolveNDose_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="gloved hands emptying open capsule into dissolve-and-dose device" /> </figure> <li>Tap the capsule to loosen its contents. While holding the capsule upright, remove the top half. Empty the contents of the capsule into the dissolve-and-dose device. If needed, pinch the capsule ends to loosen the medicine. Make sure both halves of the capsule are empty.</li><li>Pour the 10 mL of room-temperature water from the medicine cup into the dissolve-and-dose device. Only mix the medicine with room temperature water.</li><li>Screw the cap back onto the device, making sure the top is secure. Then, gently rock the device back and forth. Leave it to sit for several minutes to allow the capsule contents to dissolve fully. Do not leave the medicine and equipment unattended while you wait.</li><li>Once the solution is ready, use it right away. Pop the cap off the dissolve-and-dose device and place the oral syringe into the cap nozzle. Carefully lift the dissolve-and-dose until it is upright over the oral syringe. This will help release any air bubbles. Draw and measure the appropriate dose using the oral syringe. Your health-care provider will tell you how much solution to give your child.</li><li>Place the syringe into your child’s mouth, and slowly push the plunger to release the liquid and medicine solution. Your child may drink more water after taking their medication. Your child’s health-care provider will tell you if your child may take any other drinks or food right afterwards.</li></ol><p>If there is solution left over in the dissolve-and-dose device, do not keep it. Instead, pour it into a bottle and store it there until you can dispose of it safely. Make sure you label the bottle "hazardous for disposal". When the bottle is full, you can take it to your local pharmacy to dispose of properly.</p><p>Speak to your child’s health-care provider if your child is having trouble taking their medicine.</p><h3>While preparing your child’s medicine, please remember: </h3><ul><li>Use the tweezers, dissolve ‘n dose device and oral syringe to give the hazardous medicine only. Do not use them for other medicines.</li></ul><h2>Clean-up and storage of hazardous medicines<br></h2><p>Hazardous medicines should be handled safely. It is important to carefully handle the clean-up of the supplies and work area, and to dispose of wastes properly.<br></p><p>Remember these key tips for safe handling of hazardous medicines at home.</p><ul><li>If possible, avoid contact with hazardous medicines if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.</li><li>You and your child should wash your hands before and after handling hazardous medicines.</li><li>Wear gloves when handling hazardous medicine tablets, capsules, or liquids.</li><li>Properly clean, dispose or store the equipment and hazardous medicine.</li></ul><p>All disposable items that have been in contact with hazardous medicines, such as used paper towels and gloves, must go into a designated plastic waste bag or container. Contact the Household Hazardous Waste Depot in your neighbourhood to see if they will accept the waste bags or containers. If such a service does not exist in your area, ask a member of your child's health-care team about other options.</p><p>You may wash and reuse some of your supplies, but do not rinse them in the kitchen sink over other dishes or utensils. If you are reusing an item, such as the medicine cup, rinse it with warm soapy water and allow it to air dry. Clean the sink after washing your supplies.</p><p>Always store hazardous medicines away from children and pets. If stored at room temperature, place them in a locked box, away from moisture and direct sunlight, and in a cool, dry place. If the medicine needs refrigeration, place it in a separate container at the back of the fridge. Return the medicine to the locked box or fridge after each use. Do not keep any medicine in your purse, knapsack or diaper bag.</p><h3>Take special precautions with your child's waste (vomit, urine and stool) while they are taking hazardous medicine</h3><p>While your child is taking hazardous medicine, some of the drug is broken down and removed from the body through urine and stool. It may also appear in vomit. It is important that you protect yourself and others from hazardous medicine in your child's urine, stool or vomit by following these guidelines:</p><ul><li>When changing your child’s diaper, wear disposable gloves and place diapers in a sealed plastic bag before disposal.</li><li>If your child is toilet trained, have your child close the lid, to avoid splashes, and flush twice after using the toilet. Always make sure they wash their hands afterwards.</li><li>Have supplies ready in case you need to quickly clean up any accident. You need a paper towel, soap and water, disposable gloves, and a disposable container, such as an empty ice cream container.</li><li>Use a plastic mattress cover to protect the mattress from accidents.</li><li>Keep a plastic container close by in case of vomiting. If you use the container, empty the contents into the toilet and wash with warm soapy water.<br></li><li>Wear disposable gloves when you are handling any bodily wastes, such as changing soiled sheets or cleaning up vomit.</li><li>Wash soiled clothes or sheets separately from other laundry. If they cannot be washed right away, place them in a sealed plastic bag and set it aside.</li><li>Once you are all finished, wash your hands.</li></ul><h2>Preparing the space</h2><p>You will need to gather certain supplies and take careful steps when setting up your work area. Your child’s health-care provider will help you make a list of the supplies you will need. You can buy these materials at a grocery or drug store.</p><p>To handle your child’s hazardous medicine at home, choose an uncluttered counter or table away from windows, fans, vents, areas where you prepare food, and where children and pets play.</p><p>If you are dissolving the contents of a capsule, a gown, mask and gloves offer protection. Other supplies will include:</p><ul><li>paper towels or a disposable, absorbent plastic-backed mat — to contain any spills</li><li>a large, clear plastic bag — to contain the work area and for waste disposal</li><li>a dissolve-and-dose device — to mix and hold the solution</li><li>a medicine cup – to hold the water used to dissolve the capsules</li><li>tweezers — to pick up the medicine</li><li>an oral syringe — to give the medicine</li><li>10 mL of room-temperature water</li><li>a labelled container to place any unused mixed medicine</li><li>your child’s medicine</li></ul><h2>Giving your child the capsule solution</h2><p>Always prepare the medicine right before your child will take it. Never prepare and store the dose ahead of time.</p><p>Before preparing your child's medicine:</p> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/chemo_at_home_general_wash_hands_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="handwashing at sink" /> </figure> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/chemo_at_home_general_protect_yourself_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="person wearing mask, gown and gloves" /> </figure> <ul><li>Wash your hands with soap and water.</li><li>Put on your gloves, gown and mask.</li><li>Place paper towels or a disposable, absorbent plastic-backed mat over your work surface.<br></li></ul><p>You are now ready to handle your child’s medicine.</p>
Manipulación segura de medicamentos peligrosos en el hogar: Cómo administrar soluciones de cápsulasMManipulación segura de medicamentos peligrosos en el hogar: Cómo administrar soluciones de cápsulasSafe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving capsule solutionsSpanishPharmacyBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANADrug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2019-03-29T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Una guía para disolver y administrar una parte de la cápsula de un medicamento peligroso en forma segura.</p><p>Si su hijo debe tomar solo una parte de la cápsula, deberá mezclarla con agua primero y administrar solo la cantidad específica a su hijo.</p><p>Si su hijo debe tomar la cápsula entera y necesita mezclar el contenido con líquido o alimentos, consulte la información de <a href="/article?contentid=3799&language=spanish">Manipulación segura de medicamentos peligrosos en el hogar: Cómo mezclar cápsulas con líquido o alimentos</a>.</p><h2>Puntos claves</h2><ul><li>Para protegerse cuando manipula medicamentos peligrosos, puede usar una bata, una mascarilla y guantes.</li><li>Deberá preparar la dosis dentro de una bolsa plástica para minimizar la exposición.</li><li>Debe usar agua a temperatura ambiente y un dispositivo de disolución y dosificación para preparar la solución.</li></ul>
Manipulation sécuritaire des médicaments dangereux à domicile : Comment administrer la solution de capsuleMManipulation sécuritaire des médicaments dangereux à domicile : Comment administrer la solution de capsuleSafe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving capsule solutionsFrenchPharmacyNewborn (0-28 days);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANADrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2019-03-29T04:00:00ZHealth (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Comment dissoudre et administrer de façon sécuritaire une portion de capsule de médicaments dangereux.</p><p>Si votre enfant ne prend qu’une partie de la capsule, vous devrez d’abord la mélanger avec de l’eau et n’en donner qu’une quantité précise à votre enfant.</p><p>Si votre enfant prend la capsule entière et que le contenu doit être mélangé avec un liquide ou des aliments, consultez les informations relatives à la <a href="/article?contentid=3799&language=french">Manipulation sécuritaire des médicaments dangereux à domicile : Comment mélanger des capsules avec des liquides ou des aliments</a>.</p><h2>Qu’est-ce qu’un médicament dangereux?</h2><p>Les médicaments dangereux sont utilisés pour traiter une variété de problèmes de santé. Par exemple, la chimiothérapie est utilisée dans le traitement du cancer, alors que les immunosuppresseurs contribuent à prévenir le rejet d’organe après une transplantation.</p><p>Les médicaments dangereux peuvent causer des lésions sur les cellules saines. Il est important de se protéger lors de la manipulation de médicaments dangereux.</p><p>Même si le risque de dommage causé par la manipulation de médicaments dangereux est minime, il est recommandé d’éviter l’exposition. Il s’agit notamment d’éviter de goûter les médicaments de votre enfant. Si vous êtes enceinte ou si vous allaitez, il est préférable d’éviter tout contact avec des médicaments dangereux. Dans la mesure du possible, demandez à quelqu’un d’autre d’administrer les médicaments à votre enfant.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Le port d’une blouse, d’un masque et des gants permet de se protéger lors de la manipulation de médicaments dangereux.</li><li>Vous devrez préparer la dose dans un sac en plastique pour minimiser l’exposition.</li><li>De l’eau à température ambiante et un contenant à dissolution et à dosage sont utilisés pour préparer la solution.</li></ul><h2>Comment administrer le médicament</h2><ol><li>Versez 10 ml d’eau à température ambiante dans un petit gobelet à médicaments.</li><li>Pour préparer la seringue, retirez le capuchon et poussez le piston à fond.</li><li>Ouvrez le flacon de médicaments et utilisez une pincette pour retirer la capsule. Déposez la capsule sur la surface de travail recouverte. Remettez le couvercle sur le flacon de médicaments.</li><li>Pour minimiser la quantité de médicaments qui se retrouve dans l’air, vous devez préparer la dose à l’intérieur du sac en plastique. Mettez la capsule, la seringue pour administration orale, le gobelet à médicaments rempli d’eau ainsi que le contenant à dissolution et à dosage dans le sac en plastique transparent.</li><li>En gardant vos mains à l’intérieur du sac, dévissez le couvercle du contenant à dissolution et à dosage.</li> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/chemo_at_home_capsules_pour_into_dissolveNDose_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="gloved hands emptying open capsule into dissolve-and-dose device" /> </figure> <li>Tapotez la capsule pour relâcher son contenu. Tout en tenant la capsule dans le sens vertical, retirez la moitié supérieure. Videz le contenu de la capsule dans le contenant à dissolution et à dosage. Au besoin, pincez les extrémités de la capsule pour en relâcher le contenu. Assurez-vous que les deux moitiés de la capsule sont vides.</li><li>Versez les 10 ml d’eau à température ambiante du gobelet à médicaments dans le contenant à dissolution et à dosage. Mélangez le médicament uniquement avec de l’eau à température ambiante.</li><li>Revissez le capuchon sur le contenant en vous assurant que le dessus est bien fixé. Ensuite, basculez doucement la seringue d’avant en arrière. Laissez-la reposer pendant plusieurs minutes pour permettre au contenu de la capsule de se dissoudre complètement. Ne laissez pas le médicament et les accessoires sans surveillance pendant que vous attendez.</li><li>Une fois que la solution est prête, utilisez-la immédiatement. Retirez le capuchon du contenant à dissolution et à dosage et placez la seringue pour administration orale dans l’embout du capuchon. Soulevez délicatement le contenant à dissolution et à dosage jusqu’à ce qu’il soit à la verticale au-dessus de la seringue pour administration orale. Cette technique permettra de libérer les bulles d’air. Prélevez et mesurez la dose appropriée à l’aide de la seringue pour administration orale. Votre fournisseur de soins de santé vous indiquera la quantité de solution à administrer à votre enfant.</li><li>Placez la seringue dans la bouche de votre enfant et poussez lentement le piston pour libérer la solution liquide de médicament. Votre enfant peut boire plus d’eau après avoir pris ses médicaments. Le fournisseur de soins de santé de votre enfant vous signalera si votre enfant peut prendre d’autres boissons ou aliments juste après.</li></ol><p>S’il y a un reste de solution dans le contenant à dissolution et à dosage, ne la conservez pas. Versez-la plutôt dans une bouteille et stockez-la jusqu’à ce que vous puissiez vous en débarrasser en toute sécurité. Veillez à ce que la bouteille porte une étiquette avec la mention « dangereux, à jeter ». Lorsque la bouteille est pleine, vous pouvez l’apporter à votre pharmacie locale en vue d’une élimination appropriée.</p><p>Demandez conseil au fournisseur de soins de santé de votre enfant si ce dernier a de la difficulté à prendre ses médicaments.</p><h3>Lors de la préparation des médicaments de votre enfant, pensez à :</h3><ul><li>Utiliser la pincette, le contenant à dissolution et à dosage ainsi que la seringue pour administration orale uniquement pour administrer les médicaments dangereux. Ne pas les utiliser pour d’autres médicaments.</li></ul><h2>Nettoyage et stockage des médicaments dangereux</h2><p>Les médicaments dangereux doivent être manipulés de façon sécuritaire. Il est important de nettoyer soigneusement les accessoires et la zone de travail, et d’éliminer correctement les déchets.</p><p>Gardez bien à l’esprit ces conseils essentiels pour une manipulation sécuritaire des médicaments dangereux à domicile.</p><ul><li>Dans la mesure du possible, évitez tout contact avec des médicaments dangereux si vous êtes enceinte ou si vous allaitez.</li><li>Vous et votre enfant devez vous laver les mains avant et après avoir manipulé des médicaments dangereux.</li><li>Portez des gants lorsque vous manipulez des médicaments dangereux sous forme de comprimé, de capsule ou de liquide.</li><li>Nettoyez, éliminez ou stockez correctement les accessoires et les médicaments dangereux.</li></ul><p>Tous les articles jetables qui ont été en contact avec des médicaments dangereux, tels que le papier essuie‑tout et les gants usagés, doivent être placés dans un sac ou dans une poubelle en plastique désignée. Contactez le centre de récupération des déchets ménagers dangereux de votre quartier pour voir s’il acceptera vos sacs ou récipients à déchets. Si ce service n’existe pas dans votre région, informez-vous auprès de l’un des membres de l’équipe soignante de votre enfant au sujet de vos options.</p><p>Vous pouvez laver et réutiliser certains de vos accessoires, mais ne les rincez pas dans l’évier de la cuisine au-dessus d’autres plats ou ustensiles. Si vous réutilisez un article, comme le gobelet à médicaments, rincez-le à l’eau chaude savonneuse et laissez-le sécher à l’air. Nettoyez l’évier après avoir lavé vos accessoires.</p><p>Conservez toujours les médicaments dangereux hors de la portée des enfants et des animaux de compagnie. S’ils sont conservés à température ambiante, placez-les dans une boîte verrouillée, à l’abri de l’humidité et de la lumière directe du soleil, et dans un endroit frais et sec. Si le médicament doit être conservé dans un réfrigérateur, placez-le dans un contenant distinct à l’arrière du réfrigérateur. Rangez le médicament dans la boîte verrouillée dans le réfrigérateur après chaque utilisation. Ne conservez pas les médicaments dans votre sac à main, votre sac à dos ou sac à couches.</p><h3>Prenez des précautions particulières concernant les déchets de votre enfant (vomi, urine et selles) pendant qu’il prend des médicaments dangereux</h3><p>Lorsque votre enfant prend des médicaments dangereux, une partie de ces médicaments est décomposée et éliminée de l’organisme par l’urine et les selles. Le médicament peut également se retrouver dans son vomi. Il est important de vous protéger, vous et les autres, des médicaments dangereux présents dans l’urine, les selles ou le vomi de votre enfant en respectant les directives suivantes :</p><ul><li>Lorsque vous changez la couche de votre enfant, portez des gants jetables et placez les couches sales dans un sac en plastique scellé avant de les jeter.</li><li>Si votre enfant a appris la propreté, demandez-lui de fermer le couvercle pour éviter les éclaboussures et de tirer deux fois la chasse d’eau après avoir utilisé les toilettes. Veillez toujours à ce qu’il se lave les mains après.</li><li>Ayez les fournitures nécessaires au cas où vous devriez nettoyer rapidement un accident. Vous avez besoin d’essuie-tout, de savon et d’eau, de gants jetables et d’un grand contenant jetable, comme un pot de crème glacée vide.</li><li>Utilisez un couvre-matelas en plastique pour protéger le matelas en cas d’accident.</li><li>Ayez un contenant en plastique à portée de la main en cas de vomissements. Si vous utilisez le contenant, videz-le contenu dans la cuvette de la toilette et nettoyez-le avec de l’eau savonneuse tiède.</li><li>Portez des gants jetables lorsque vous manipulez des déchets de l’organisme, comme lorsque vous changez des draps souillés ou nettoyez des vomissements.</li><li>Nettoyez les vêtements ou les draps souillés séparément dans le lave-linge une première fois, puis nettoyez-les de nouveau. S’il n’est pas possible de les nettoyer immédiatement, placez les dans un sac en plastique scellé et mettez-les de côté.</li><li>Une fois que vous avez fini, lavez-vous les mains.</li></ul><h2>Préparation de l’espace</h2><p>Il vous faudra rassembler certains articles et adopter des mesures prudentes lors de la préparation de votre espace de travail. Le fournisseur de soins de santé de votre enfant vous aidera à dresser une liste des accessoires dont vous aurez besoin. Vous pouvez les acheter dans une épicerie ou une pharmacie.</p><p>Pour manipuler les médicaments dangereux de votre enfant à la maison, choisissez un comptoir ou une table vide et loin des fenêtres, des ventilateurs, des évents, des zones où vous préparez la nourriture et où les enfants et les animaux jouent.</p><p>Si vous devez dissoudre le contenu d’une capsule, portez une blouse, un masque et des gants pour votre protection. Vous aurez également besoin des articles suivants :</p><ul><li>du papier essuie-tout ou une feuille absorbante jetable à endos en plastique — pour absorber tout déversement</li><li>un grand sac en plastique transparent — pour protéger la zone de travail et pour l’élimination des déchets</li><li>un contenant à dissolution et à dosage — pour mélanger et retenir la solution</li><li>un gobelet à médicaments — pour contenir l’eau utilisée pour dissoudre les capsules</li><li>une pincette — pour ramasser la capsule</li><li>une seringue pour administration orale — pour administrer le médicament</li><li>10 ml d’eau à température ambiante</li><li>un contenant étiqueté pour placer tout médicament mélangé non utilisé</li><li>les médicaments de votre enfant</li></ul><h2>Comment administrer la solution de capsule à votre enfant</h2><p>Préparez toujours le médicament juste avant que votre enfant ne le prenne. Ne jamais préparer et conserver la dose à l’avance.</p><p>Avant de préparer le médicament de votre enfant :</p> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/chemo_at_home_general_wash_hands_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="handwashing at sink" /> </figure> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/chemo_at_home_general_protect_yourself_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="person wearing mask, gown and gloves" /> </figure> <ol><li>Lavez-vous les mains à l’eau savonneuse.</li><li>Portez des gants, une blouse et un masque.</li><li>Déposez du papier essuie-tout ou une feuille absorbante jetable à endos en plastique sur votre surface de travail.</li><p>Vous êtes maintenant prêt à manipuler le médicament de votre enfant.</p></ol>
如何在家安全处理危险性药物:胶囊溶液的给药如何在家安全处理危险性药物:胶囊溶液的给药Safe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving capsule solutionsChineseSimplifiedPharmacyBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANADrug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2019-03-29T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>有关溶解部分危险性胶囊和给药的安全指南</p><p>如果您的孩子只服用部分胶囊,您需要先将其内容物与水混合,然后只给孩子服用特定的剂量。</p><p>如果您的孩子要服用整粒胶囊,并且其内容物需要与液体或食物混合,请参阅“<a href="/article?contentID=3799&language=chinesesimplified">如何在家安全处理危险性药物:将胶囊与液体或食物混合</a>”。</p><h2>关键点</h2><ul><li>处理危险性药物时,罩衣、口罩和手套可提供保护。</li><li>您需要在塑料袋内准备剂量,以最大程度地减少暴露。</li><li>使用室温水和一个溶解/定量装置来配制溶液。</li></ul>
التعامل الآمن مع الأدوية الخطرة في المنزل: إعطاء محاليل الكبسولاتاالتعامل الآمن مع الأدوية الخطرة في المنزل: إعطاء محاليل الكبسولاتSafe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving capsule solutionsArabicPharmacyBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANADrug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2019-03-29T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>دليل لتذويب وإعطاء جرعة من كبسولات الأدوية الخطرة بطريقة آمنة.</p><p>إذا كانت جرعة طفلك عبارة عن جزء من الكبسولة، فعليك أولًا مزجها بالماء وإعطاء الطفل الكمية الموصى بها فقط.</p><p>إذا كان طفلك يأخذ الكبسولة كاملة ويجب مزج المحتوى بسائل أو بالطعام، راجع المعلومات المتعلقة <a href="/article?contentid=3799&language=arabic">بالتعامل الآمن مع الأدوية الخطرة في المنزل: مزج الكبسولات بالسوائل أو الطعام</a>.</p><h2>النقاط الرئيسية</h2><ul><li>يوفر ارتداء الثوب الطبي الواقي والقفازات الحماية اللازمة عند التعامل مع الأدوية الخطرة</li><li>عليك إعداد الجرعة داخل كيس بلاستيكي للحد من التعرّض.</li><li>تحتاج لإعداد المحلول ماء بدرجة حرارة الغرفة وجهاز الإذابة وإعطاء الجرعة.</li></ul>

 

 

 

 

Safe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving capsule solutions3800.00000000000Safe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving capsule solutionsSafe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving capsule solutionsSEnglishPharmacyNewborn (0-28 days);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANADrug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-10-22T04:00:00Z7.7000000000000063.90000000000001467.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>A guide on dissolving and giving a portion of a hazardous medicine capsule safely.</p><p>If your child is taking only a portion of the capsule, you will need to mix it with water first and give only a specific amount to your child.</p><p>If your child is taking the entire capsule and the contents need to be mixed with liquid or food, see the information on Safe Handling of hazardous medicines at home: Mixing capsules with liquid or food.</p><h2>What is hazardous medicine?</h2><p>Hazardous medicines are used to treat a variety of medical conditions. For example, chemotherapy is used to treat cancer, and immunosuppressants are used to prevent organ rejection after a transplant.</p><p>Hazardous medicine can damage healthy cells. Anyone handling hazardous medicine should keep themselves protected.</p><p>Although the risk of harm from handling hazardous medicine is small, it is a good idea to avoid exposure. This includes not tasting your child’s medicine. If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, it is best to avoid contact with hazardous medicine. If possible have someone else prepare and give your child their capsules.<br></p> <div class="asset-video"><p></p> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/XvSHHvLBpj8">frameborder=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;0&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;</iframe>  <br> <p></p>For more videos on how to safely handle hazardous medicines, please view the <a href="https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjJtOP3StIuWBtC0ID5BCbZCMVHJvTcdr">Safe Handling</a> playlist.<br></div> <br> <p></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A gown, mask and gloves offer protection when handling hazardous medicine.</li><li>You will need to prepare the dose inside a plastic bag to minimize exposure.</li><li>Room temperature water and a dissolve-and-dose device is used to make the solution.</li></ul><h2>Giving the medicine</h2><ol><li>Pour 10 mL of room-temperature water into a small medicine cup.</li><li>To prepare the syringe, remove the cap and push the plunger all the way in.</li><li>Open the medicine bottle and use tweezers to remove the capsule. Place the capsule onto the covered work surface. Put the lid back on the medicine bottle.</li><li>To minimize the amount of medicine that gets into the air, you will prepare the dose inside the plastic bag. Put the capsule, oral syringe, medicine cup filled with water, and the dissolve-and-dose device inside the clear plastic bag.</li><li>With your hands inside the bag, unscrew the lid of the dissolve-and-dose device.</li> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/chemo_at_home_capsules_pour_into_dissolveNDose_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="gloved hands emptying open capsule into dissolve-and-dose device" /> </figure> <li>Tap the capsule to loosen its contents. While holding the capsule upright, remove the top half. Empty the contents of the capsule into the dissolve-and-dose device. If needed, pinch the capsule ends to loosen the medicine. Make sure both halves of the capsule are empty.</li><li>Pour the 10 mL of room-temperature water from the medicine cup into the dissolve-and-dose device. Only mix the medicine with room temperature water.</li><li>Screw the cap back onto the device, making sure the top is secure. Then, gently rock the device back and forth. Leave it to sit for several minutes to allow the capsule contents to dissolve fully. Do not leave the medicine and equipment unattended while you wait.</li><li>Once the solution is ready, use it right away. Pop the cap off the dissolve-and-dose device and place the oral syringe into the cap nozzle. Carefully lift the dissolve-and-dose until it is upright over the oral syringe. This will help release any air bubbles. Draw and measure the appropriate dose using the oral syringe. Your health-care provider will tell you how much solution to give your child.</li><li>Place the syringe into your child’s mouth, and slowly push the plunger to release the liquid and medicine solution. Your child may drink more water after taking their medication. Your child’s health-care provider will tell you if your child may take any other drinks or food right afterwards.</li></ol><p>If there is solution left over in the dissolve-and-dose device, do not keep it. Instead, pour it into a bottle and store it there until you can dispose of it safely. Make sure you label the bottle "hazardous for disposal". When the bottle is full, you can take it to your local pharmacy to dispose of properly.</p><p>Speak to your child’s health-care provider if your child is having trouble taking their medicine.</p><h3>While preparing your child’s medicine, please remember: </h3><ul><li>Use the tweezers, dissolve ‘n dose device and oral syringe to give the hazardous medicine only. Do not use them for other medicines.</li></ul><h2>Clean-up and storage of hazardous medicines<br></h2><p>Hazardous medicines should be handled safely. It is important to carefully handle the clean-up of the supplies and work area, and to dispose of wastes properly.<br></p><p>Remember these key tips for safe handling of hazardous medicines at home.</p><ul><li>If possible, avoid contact with hazardous medicines if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.</li><li>You and your child should wash your hands before and after handling hazardous medicines.</li><li>Wear gloves when handling hazardous medicine tablets, capsules, or liquids.</li><li>Properly clean, dispose or store the equipment and hazardous medicine.</li></ul><p>All disposable items that have been in contact with hazardous medicines, such as used paper towels and gloves, must go into a designated plastic waste bag or container. Contact the Household Hazardous Waste Depot in your neighbourhood to see if they will accept the waste bags or containers. If such a service does not exist in your area, ask a member of your child's health-care team about other options.</p><p>You may wash and reuse some of your supplies, but do not rinse them in the kitchen sink over other dishes or utensils. If you are reusing an item, such as the medicine cup, rinse it with warm soapy water and allow it to air dry. Clean the sink after washing your supplies.</p><p>Always store hazardous medicines away from children and pets. If stored at room temperature, place them in a locked box, away from moisture and direct sunlight, and in a cool, dry place. If the medicine needs refrigeration, place it in a separate container at the back of the fridge. Return the medicine to the locked box or fridge after each use. Do not keep any medicine in your purse, knapsack or diaper bag.</p><h3>Take special precautions with your child's waste (vomit, urine and stool) while they are taking hazardous medicine</h3><p>While your child is taking hazardous medicine, some of the drug is broken down and removed from the body through urine and stool. It may also appear in vomit. It is important that you protect yourself and others from hazardous medicine in your child's urine, stool or vomit by following these guidelines:</p><ul><li>When changing your child’s diaper, wear disposable gloves and place diapers in a sealed plastic bag before disposal.</li><li>If your child is toilet trained, have your child close the lid, to avoid splashes, and flush twice after using the toilet. Always make sure they wash their hands afterwards.</li><li>Have supplies ready in case you need to quickly clean up any accident. You need a paper towel, soap and water, disposable gloves, and a disposable container, such as an empty ice cream container.</li><li>Use a plastic mattress cover to protect the mattress from accidents.</li><li>Keep a plastic container close by in case of vomiting. If you use the container, empty the contents into the toilet and wash with warm soapy water.<br></li><li>Wear disposable gloves when you are handling any bodily wastes, such as changing soiled sheets or cleaning up vomit.</li><li>Wash soiled clothes or sheets separately from other laundry. If they cannot be washed right away, place them in a sealed plastic bag and set it aside.</li><li>Once you are all finished, wash your hands.</li></ul><h2>Preparing the space</h2><p>You will need to gather certain supplies and take careful steps when setting up your work area. Your child’s health-care provider will help you make a list of the supplies you will need. You can buy these materials at a grocery or drug store.</p><p>To handle your child’s hazardous medicine at home, choose an uncluttered counter or table away from windows, fans, vents, areas where you prepare food, and where children and pets play.</p><p>If you are dissolving the contents of a capsule, a gown, mask and gloves offer protection. Other supplies will include:</p><ul><li>paper towels or a disposable, absorbent plastic-backed mat — to contain any spills</li><li>a large, clear plastic bag — to contain the work area and for waste disposal</li><li>a dissolve-and-dose device — to mix and hold the solution</li><li>a medicine cup – to hold the water used to dissolve the capsules</li><li>tweezers — to pick up the medicine</li><li>an oral syringe — to give the medicine</li><li>10 mL of room-temperature water</li><li>a labelled container to place any unused mixed medicine</li><li>your child’s medicine</li></ul><h2>Giving your child the capsule solution</h2><p>Always prepare the medicine right before your child will take it. Never prepare and store the dose ahead of time.</p><p>Before preparing your child's medicine:</p> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/chemo_at_home_general_wash_hands_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="handwashing at sink" /> </figure> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/chemo_at_home_general_protect_yourself_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="person wearing mask, gown and gloves" /> </figure> <ul><li>Wash your hands with soap and water.</li><li>Put on your gloves, gown and mask.</li><li>Place paper towels or a disposable, absorbent plastic-backed mat over your work surface.<br></li></ul><p>You are now ready to handle your child’s medicine.</p>Safe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving capsule solutionsFalse

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.

Our Sponsors