Newborn babies: The first monthNNewborn babies: The first monthNewborn babies: The first monthEnglishNeonatologyNewborn (0-28 days)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC10.000000000000057.0000000000000168.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>This page is an introduction to the Newborn Babies section of the Pregnancy & Babies resource centre. It gives definitions for "newborn" and "neonatal," both of which pertain to the first 28 days of life.</p><p>The World Health Organization defines the newborn period as the first 28 days of life. This is also called the neonatal period, and the medical term for your newborn baby is neonate. This section of the Pregnancy & Babies Resource Centre provides information about your newborn baby, including what they will look like at birth, medical care, newborn baby behaviour, feeding and routine care at home, and health concerns. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>In the few minutes after birth, your newborn baby is stimulated to breathe, the amniotic fluid is dried off so they doesn’t lose heat, and they are carefully observed during the transition process.</li></ul>
Nouveau-nés : un aperçuNNouveau-nés : un aperçuNewborn babies: The first monthFrenchNeonatologyNewborn (0-28 days)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC10.000000000000057.0000000000000168.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Cette page sert d’introduction à la section des nouveau-nés du Centre de ressources sur la grossesse et les bébés. On y trouve les définitions des termes « nouveau-né » et « néonatal » utilisés pendant les 28 premiers jours qui suivent la naissance.</p><p>Selon l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS), la période néonatale se compose des 28 jours qui suivent la naissance. Le terme médical pour désigner le bébé à cet âge est « nouveau-né ».</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Dans les minutes qui suivent la naissance, on stimule votre nouveau-né afin qu’il respire, on essuie le liquide amniotique afin d’éviter la perte de chaleur et on l’observe attentivement durant le processus de transition.</li></ul>

 

 

Newborn babies: The first month419.000000000000Newborn babies: The first monthNewborn babies: The first monthNEnglishNeonatologyNewborn (0-28 days)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC10.000000000000057.0000000000000168.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>This page is an introduction to the Newborn Babies section of the Pregnancy & Babies resource centre. It gives definitions for "newborn" and "neonatal," both of which pertain to the first 28 days of life.</p><p>The World Health Organization defines the newborn period as the first 28 days of life. This is also called the neonatal period, and the medical term for your newborn baby is neonate. This section of the Pregnancy & Babies Resource Centre provides information about your newborn baby, including what they will look like at birth, medical care, newborn baby behaviour, feeding and routine care at home, and health concerns. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>In the few minutes after birth, your newborn baby is stimulated to breathe, the amniotic fluid is dried off so they doesn’t lose heat, and they are carefully observed during the transition process.</li></ul><p>After your baby is born and the health-care provider makes sure that they are breathing properly, they will be placed on your chest for bonding and the all-important skin-to-skin contact. You will be able to marvel at the amazing little bundle that you have wondered about for the last nine months.</p><p>The most profound change at birth is your baby’s first breath. At this point, your baby’s lungs, which were filled with fluid during pregnancy, must suddenly fill with oxygen from the air. The fluid in the lungs is removed through the blood and lymph system, and is replaced by air. Your baby’s lungs must be able to exchange oxygen for carbon dioxide. At the same time, vigorous blood circulation in the lungs will begin. The first few breaths after birth may be the most difficult breaths your baby will take for the rest of their life. </p><p>In the few minutes after birth, your newborn baby is stimulated to breathe, the amniotic fluid is dried off so they don't lose heat, and they are carefully observed during the transition process. At this point, if all is going well, your newborn baby should be placed on your chest, preferably skin-to-skin. </p><p>When your baby is born, they may not look exactly as you expected. If you have not spent much time around newborn babies up until this point, you may be downright surprised at their appearance. If your newborn baby was born vaginally, the shape of their head may be elongated. This is referred to as a "conehead." </p><p>This section of the Pregnancy & Babies Resource Centre describes the changes your newborn baby’s body goes through at birth, what they look like at birth, and their movements, senses and reflexes. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/newborn_babies_the_first_month.jpgNewborn babies: The first month

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.