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Breast changes and conditionsBBreast changes and conditionsBreast changes and conditionsEnglishNeonatologyNewborn (0-28 days)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZDebbie Stone, RN, RLCJoyce Touw, BScN, PNC(C), RN, IBCLC, RLCAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC9.0000000000000063.0000000000000825.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about the changes that your breasts will go through after childbirth, and various breast disorders that can interfere with breastfeeding your baby.</p><p>You may experience changes in your breasts following pregnancy and as you start to breastfeed. Breast engorgement, sore nipples, plugged milk ducts and mastitis have all been known to occur while breastfeeding.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Treatments for breast engorgement include gently massaging your breasts, using warm compresses before breastfeeding and cold compresses between feedings.</li> <li>A plugged milk duct can lead to infection so it is important to clear the duct as soon as possible.</li> <li>Mastitis is treated with antibiotics and applying warm compresses. Abscesses will need to be surgically drained.</li></ul>
Changements dans les seins et problèmesCChangements dans les seins et problèmesBreast changes and conditionsFrenchNeonatologyNewborn (0-28 days)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZDebbie Stone, RN, RLCJoyce Touw, BScN, PNC(C), RN, IBCLC, RLCAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC9.0000000000000063.0000000000000825.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez-en davantage sur les changements qui se produiront dans vos seins après la naissance et sur les divers problèmes mammaires qui peuvent interférer avec l’allaitement.</p><p>Vous pourriez observer des changements de vos seins après la grossesse et lorsque vous commencerez à allaiter. L’engorgement des seins, des mamelons douloureux, des canaux galactophores bouchés et des mammites sont peuvent survenir pendant l’allaitement.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les traitements contre l’engorgement des seins comprennent le massage délicat de vos seins, l’utilisation de compresses chaudes avant l’allaitement et de compresses froides entre les tétées.</li> <li>Un canal galactophore bouché peut mener à une infection, il est donc important de nettoyer ce canal aussitôt que possible.</li> <li>Une mammite est traitée à l’aide d’antibiotiques et en appliquant des compresses chaudes. </li> <li>Les abcès doivent être drainés de manière chirurgicale.</li></ul>

 

 

Breast changes and conditions441.000000000000Breast changes and conditionsBreast changes and conditionsBEnglishNeonatologyNewborn (0-28 days)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZDebbie Stone, RN, RLCJoyce Touw, BScN, PNC(C), RN, IBCLC, RLCAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC9.0000000000000063.0000000000000825.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about the changes that your breasts will go through after childbirth, and various breast disorders that can interfere with breastfeeding your baby.</p><p>You may experience changes in your breasts following pregnancy and as you start to breastfeed. Breast engorgement, sore nipples, plugged milk ducts and mastitis have all been known to occur while breastfeeding.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Treatments for breast engorgement include gently massaging your breasts, using warm compresses before breastfeeding and cold compresses between feedings.</li> <li>A plugged milk duct can lead to infection so it is important to clear the duct as soon as possible.</li> <li>Mastitis is treated with antibiotics and applying warm compresses. Abscesses will need to be surgically drained.</li></ul><h2>Breast changes after childbirth</h2><p>Your breasts, which became tender and larger during pregnancy, are filled with a special fluid called colostrum for the first few days after childbirth. Colostrum is a low-volume, highly concentrated fluid that provides all the nourishment your newborn baby needs while your breasts begin producing larger milk volumes around the third or fourth day of life. Colostrum is rich in antibodies that will protect your newborn baby against certain infections. This is important because your newborn baby’s immune system is immature at first and is not able to fight infections very well on its own. After about a week, your breast milk begins to change to a more mature milk to meet all your baby’s growth and development needs. </p><h3>Breast engorgement</h3><p>When your milk comes in on day three or four after birth, your breasts may become full, firm, and uncomfortable. This is called breast engorgement, and it may be accompanied by a fever for a short time. Wear a well-fitted maternity bra for support. If your milk is flowing, take warm, not hot, showers and gently massage your breasts to help increase circulation and open the milk ducts. Use warm compresses before breastfeeding and express your milk after nursing to completely empty your breasts. Try using cold compresses on your breasts between feedings in order to reduce the breast swelling and provide relief. </p><h3>Sore nipples</h3><p>If your baby takes some time to learn to latch properly, your nipples may become sensitive. Here are a few things you can do: </p><ul><li>Expose your nipples to the air after nursing until they dry. </li><li>Protect your nipples from rubbing on your clothes by using breast shells. </li><li>Vary your nursing position to put your baby’s mouth pressure on a different area of the breast each time. </li><li>Try to relax before and during feedings. </li><li>Apply gentle downward pressure to your baby's chin to open the mouth wider if you are having discomfort. </li><li>Take your baby off and re-latch if the discomfort doesn’t go away after another minute or two. </li><li>Avoid using soap on your nipples as this will cause them to become dry.</li><li>If your nipples are sore or develop a crack that bleeds, ask your health-care provider for help. </li></ul><p>Try to be patient while you and your baby learn to breastfeed, because breast milk is the ideal food for your baby. It usually takes three to four weeks for breastfeeding to become well-established and trouble-free. During this time, it is best if you don’t give your baby a bottle to confuse the different methods of sucking and milk flow. Please remember that if you can’t or don’t want for any reason to continue to latch your baby to the breast, your breast milk can be easily expressed and given to your baby by bottle.</p><p>Try to maintain a nutritious diet when you are breastfeeding to stay healthy. Continue to take your prenatal vitamins while you are breastfeeding to ensure that you get adequate vitamins and minerals. </p><h3>Plugged ducts</h3><p>A plugged duct is a temporary blockage in one or more of your milk ducts. It feels like a tender, hard lump in your breast. It can occur if your baby does not completely empty your breast, or if you cause pressure on any part of your breast with your fingers or a tight bra. </p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Plugged milk </span><span class="asset-image-title">duct</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Plugged_milk_duct_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="A breast with normal milk gland, nipple and milk duct, and a breast with swollen milk glands and plugged duct" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Milk</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> is produced in the milk glands, and travels to the nipple via the milk ducts. Occasionally these ducts become blocked if the breast has not emptied fully during feeding.</figcaption> </figure> <p>A plugged duct can lead to infection, and therefore it is important to clear the duct as soon as possible. This can be done in a number of ways. Try nursing your baby on the tender breast first, to make sure it is emptied of milk before switching to the other breast. Gently massage the milk duct and apply gentle pressure toward the nipple, then try to express milk from it. Use moist heat, such as a hot bath or shower, or a heating pad on the tender breast to help open up the milk duct to clear the blocked milk. Watch out for redness, or flu-like feelings, which could be signs of a breast infection called mastitis.</p><h3>Mastitis</h3><p>After childbirth, some women develop an infection of the breasts called mastitis. The mother develops chillls, fever, and flu-like symptoms. An area of the breasts becomes hard, red, and painful. Mastitis is treated with antibiotics. It is still OK to breastfeed. Gentle pumping or nursing should be done to help prevent the development of an abscess. Make sure the breasts are drained at regular intervals. Continue applying warmth to the involved area. If an abscess does form, it is usually very painful and will need to be surgically drained. </p><h3>Flat or inverted nipples</h3><p>Some women have flat or, rarely, inverted nipples, which can make breastfeeding a real challenge. It is still possible to breastfeed if the baby is put to the breast immediately after childbirth on a soft breast, and no artificial nipples are used until nursing is well established. Speak with a lactation consultant or other breastfeeding specialist for tips if you are having difficulties. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/breast_changes_conditions.jpgBreast changes and conditionsFalse

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