Motor development: The first six monthsMMotor development: The first six monthsMotor development: The first six monthsEnglishNABaby (1-12 months)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC8.0000000000000072.00000000000001191.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about motor development in the first six months of a baby's life. Milestones such as head control, sitting up and rolling over are discussed.</p><p>This page describes some of the milestones that your baby will reach during the first six months of life. It is important to keep in mind, however, that every baby develops at their own pace, and that the ages listed are not set in stone. Also, this page describes development of the healthy baby who was born at full term. A baby who was born prematurely would meet these milestones a bit later than a full term baby. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Babies will develop control of their head, neck and upper body during the first few months of life.</li> <li>By month six, babies have increased flexibility and may be able to roll over, move around on their tummy and sit up if placed in a sitting position.</li></ul>
النمو الحركي: الاشهر الستة الاولىاالنمو الحركي: الاشهر الستة الاولىMotor development: The first six monthsArabicNABaby (1-12 months)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC8.0000000000000072.00000000000001191.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>اقرأ عن النمو الحركي في الاشهر الستة الاولى من حياة الطفل. معالم مثل التحكم في الرأس، والجلوس والتدحرج تجري مناقشتها.</p>
动作的发展:最初的六个月动作的发展:最初的六个月Motor development: The first six monthsChineseSimplifiedNABaby (1-12 months)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC72.00000000000008.000000000000001191.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z了解宝宝出生后前半年的动作发展。还讨论了一些具有里程碑意义的进展,如头部控制、坐立以及翻滚等。<br>
動作發展:最初的六個月動作發展:最初的六個月Motor Development: The First Six MonthsChineseTraditionalNABaby (1-12 months)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC72.00000000000008.000000000000001191.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z瞭解寶寶出生後前半年的動作發展。還討論了一些具有里程碑意義的進展,如頭部控制、坐立以及翻滾等。
Desarrollo motor: los primeros seis meses de vidaDDesarrollo motor: los primeros seis meses de vidaMotor Development: The First Six MonthsSpanishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Lea acerca del desarrollo motor en los primeros seis meses de vida de un bebé.</p>
தசை இயக்க வளர்ச்சி: முதல் ஆறு மாதங்கள்தசை இயக்க வளர்ச்சி: முதல் ஆறு மாதங்கள்Motor Development: The First Six MonthsTamilNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>ஒரு குழந்தையின் வாழ்க்கையின் முதல் ஆறு மாதத்தில் ஏற்படும் தசை இயக்க வளர்ச்சியைப் பற்றி வாசிக்கவும்.</p>
حرکی نشونما: پہلے چھے مہینےححرکی نشونما: پہلے چھے مہینےMotor Development: The First Six MonthsUrduNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00Z72.00000000000008.000000000000001191.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Zبچے کی زندگی کے پہلے چھے ماہ کے حرکی نشونما کے بارے میں جانئے۔ یہاں سر کا کنٹرول، بیٹھنا اور گھومنا جیسے سنگِ میل کا زکر کیا گیا ہے ۔
Développement moteur : les six premiers moisDDéveloppement moteur : les six premiers moisMotor development: The first six monthsFrenchNABaby (1-12 months)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC8.0000000000000072.00000000000001191.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez-en davantage sur le développement moteur d’un bébé durant les six premiers mois de la vie et sur les étapes qu’il franchira durant cette période, comme contrôler sa tête, s’asseoir et se retourner.</p><p>La présente page décrit certaines étapes que votre bébé franchira pendant les six premiers mois de sa vie. Cependant, n’oubliez pas que chaque bébé se développe selon son propre rythme et que les âges énumérés sont estimatifs. De plus, la présente page décrit le développement d’un bébé en santé né à terme. Un bébé prématuré franchira ces étapes un peu plus tard qu’un bébé né à terme. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les bébés développeront le contrôle de leur tête, de leur cou et de leur torse au cours des premiers mois de leur vie.</li> <li>Vers l’âge de six mois, les bébés ont gagné en flexibilité et pourraient être capables de se retourner, de se déplacer sur leur ventre et de rester assis si on les place en position assise. </li></ul>

 

 

Motor development: The first six months486.000000000000Motor development: The first six monthsMotor development: The first six monthsMEnglishNABaby (1-12 months)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC8.0000000000000072.00000000000001191.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about motor development in the first six months of a baby's life. Milestones such as head control, sitting up and rolling over are discussed.</p><p>This page describes some of the milestones that your baby will reach during the first six months of life. It is important to keep in mind, however, that every baby develops at their own pace, and that the ages listed are not set in stone. Also, this page describes development of the healthy baby who was born at full term. A baby who was born prematurely would meet these milestones a bit later than a full term baby. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Babies will develop control of their head, neck and upper body during the first few months of life.</li> <li>By month six, babies have increased flexibility and may be able to roll over, move around on their tummy and sit up if placed in a sitting position.</li></ul><h2>Month one</h2><p>By the time your baby is one month old, their neck and shoulder muscles are stronger than at birth, and they have better control of their head. If they are lying on their tummy, they may be able to lift their chin off the ground for a short time. However, you will still need to support your baby's head if you are carrying them around, and their head will continue to lag behind if you try to pull them from a lying position to sitting. When held in the sitting position, your baby's back will be almost completely rounded, and they may be able to hold up their head for a moment. </p><p>If held in the standing position, your baby will flop down at the knees and hips. Their walking reflex is still intact though; when the sole of their foot is pressed on a flat surface, they will try to take a step. </p><p>Your baby still usually holds their hands in a closed position. If you open their fingers and give them something to hold, they will grasp it for a few seconds and then drop it. </p><h2>Month two</h2><p>By the end of the second month, you will notice continuing improvements in your baby's head control. When lying on their tummy, they will be able to lift their head and shoulders off the bed a few inches and support themselves with their arms. If you hold them up against your shoulder, they should be able to hold their head up by themselves for a short time. </p><p>If you place your baby on their back, they will raise their arms above their head in a U shape. This indicates that your baby is using their arms in a symmetrical manner, and it is a very important accomplishment. It means that your baby will soon be ready to use their hands together to accomplish a particular task. </p><p>If you hold your baby in a sitting position, you may notice that their back, though still quite rounded, is starting to straighten out. They may be able to hold their head up in this position for a very short time. </p><p>Your baby's grasp reflex continues to get weaker this month. As the grasp reflex disappears, your baby will start to grasp things voluntarily. If you try to give them an object to hold, their fingers will open. If they can grasp the object, they will try to bring it to their mouth. </p><h2>Month three</h2><p>This month, your baby's neck and shoulder muscles continue to become stronger. By the end of the third month, if they are placed on their tummy, they should be able to hold their head above the plane of the rest of their body. After the third month, a baby's ability to hold their head up when placed on their tummy is no longer used to assess head control.</p><p>Your baby's arm and hand coordination will continue to improve and become more deliberate. their grasp reflex has disappeared, and their hands are mostly open now. If you offer them a toy to hold, they will open their hand and try to hold it between their palm and their fingers. This is called the ulnar grasp. Because they have not yet learned how to use their thumb, they will almost inevitably drop the object soon after grasping it. </p><p>If you place your baby on their tummy or back, they will kick their legs vigorously. This is good exercise for the months ahead, in preparation for crawling and walking. </p><p>If you pull them into a sitting position, their head will lag only slightly. Once sitting, they will be able to hold their head up for longer periods. </p><h2>Month four</h2><p>By the end of the fourth month, your baby's back muscles are much stronger than before, and they have much better control over the movements of their arms and legs. The combination of these skills will allow your baby to roll from their stomach to their back with a bit of practice. However, they still do not have the strength to roll from their back to their stomach. They may find this very frustrating at times. </p><p>Your little one now has very good head control when held in the sitting position, and they can hold their head up constantly. However, if you suddenly sway your baby, their head will wobble, indicating that their head control is not totally complete. </p><p>Your baby will become quite fascinated with their hands and what they can do with them. They spend a lot of time watching their hands as they move them toward objects. However, their coordination continues to be quite limited and they cannot move their thumb independently of their other fingers. Therefore, they still cannot pick up toys very well at this point. </p><h2>Month five</h2><p>Your baby is very flexible, and one thing they will enjoy thoroughly is bringing their toes to their mouth for a taste.</p><p>Their neck, shoulder, and chest muscles continue to gain in strength. Their back has straightened out and the muscle tone in their torso is firm. This allows them to support their upper body and sit for a few seconds without falling over. They are now able to roll over completely - from tummy to back and then from their back to their tummy. Now they are officially mobile. </p><p>Now, when you pull your baby to the sitting position, they will have no head lag at all. Their head control is excellent now. If they are in the sitting position and you sway them, their head will not wobble at all. </p><p>Your baby is becoming much better at grasping and holding larger objects. They will try to cup their hand around a toy that they want to pick up. If they manages to grasp the toy, they will use their fingers and mouth to explore it more fully. Babies like to put things in their mouths because the lips and tongue are very sensitive; they are great resources for exploring new objects. </p><h2>Month six</h2><p>By now, rolling over is no problem! Your baby may start to push their way along on their tummy, or propel themselves backwards with their hands. Chances are that your baby will learn to sit up this month, if you prop them up in that position. They will be pretty wobbly, and they'll need to use their hands to support themselves while sitting. Their legs will be strong enough to stand, with your support, for a minute or two. </p><p>Around this time, your baby may start to lose interest in staring at their hand movements. Maybe this is because they are finally mobile, and able to explore other things! </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/motor_development_the_first_six_months.jpgMotor development: The first six months

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