Bath time for babiesBBath time for babiesBath time for babiesEnglishNABaby (1-12 months)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZHazel Pleasants, RN, MNAndrew James, MBChB, FRACP, FRCPC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>How to effectively give a baby a bath, either in the baby tub or the "big" tub. Considerations for bathtub safety are provided.</p><p>When it comes to normal baby care, nothing is as scary to new parents as bath time. Don't worry about putting baby in a tub for the first couple of weeks, until the umbilical stump has fallen off. During these early days, a sponge bath will do. After your baby's umbilical cord stump has fallen off and the area has healed, you can start to put them into the baby tub for baths. Your baby will not be ready to use the "big" bathtub until they are three to six months old, when they can hold their head up properly. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Once your baby's umbilical cord stump has fallen off and the area has healed, you can start to put them into the baby tub for baths.</li> <li>Once your baby is able to sit up by themselves or with minimal help (around three to six months), you may want to switch them to the family tub.</li> <li>Remain within arm's reach of your baby--never leave them alone in the tub and remember that hot water can burn your baby's fragile skin.</li></ul>
L’heure du bainLL’heure du bainBath time for babiesFrenchNABaby (1-12 months)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZHazel Pleasants, RN, MNAndrew James, MBChB, FRACP, FRCPC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Comment donnez un bain à un bébé, que ce soit dans le bain pour bébés ou le « gros » bain. On y fournit également des conseils de sécurité.</p><p>En matière de soins à prodiguer à un nouveau-né, rien n'effraie plus les parents que l’heure du bain. Ne vous préoccupez pas de donner un bain au bébé pendant les premières semaines de sa vie, et ce, jusqu'à ce que le moignon du cordon ombilical tombe. Durant ce temps, un bain d'éponge suffira. Une fois que le moignon du cordon ombilical de votre nouveau-né est tombé et que cette région est guérie, vous pouvez commencer à le mettre dans le bain pour bébés pour lui donner un bain. Votre nouveau-né ne sera pas prêt à utiliser le « gros » bain avant l’âge de trois à six mois car il doit être en mesure de tenir sa tête adéquatement.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Une fois que le cordon ombilical de votre bébé est tombé et que la zone est guérie, vous pouvez commencer à lui donner son bain dans la baignoire pour bébé.</li> <li>Une fois que votre bébé est capable de rester assis tout seul ou avec un minimum d’aide (à environ trois à six mois), vous pouvez passer à la baignoire familiale.</li> <li>Restez à portée de main de votre bébé, ne le laissez jamais seul dans la baignoire et n’oubliez pas que l’eau chaude peut brûler la peau fragile de votre bébé.</li></ul>

 

 

Bath time for babies494.000000000000Bath time for babiesBath time for babiesBEnglishNABaby (1-12 months)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZHazel Pleasants, RN, MNAndrew James, MBChB, FRACP, FRCPC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>How to effectively give a baby a bath, either in the baby tub or the "big" tub. Considerations for bathtub safety are provided.</p><p>When it comes to normal baby care, nothing is as scary to new parents as bath time. Don't worry about putting baby in a tub for the first couple of weeks, until the umbilical stump has fallen off. During these early days, a sponge bath will do. After your baby's umbilical cord stump has fallen off and the area has healed, you can start to put them into the baby tub for baths. Your baby will not be ready to use the "big" bathtub until they are three to six months old, when they can hold their head up properly. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Once your baby's umbilical cord stump has fallen off and the area has healed, you can start to put them into the baby tub for baths.</li> <li>Once your baby is able to sit up by themselves or with minimal help (around three to six months), you may want to switch them to the family tub.</li> <li>Remain within arm's reach of your baby--never leave them alone in the tub and remember that hot water can burn your baby's fragile skin.</li></ul><h2>The baby tub</h2><p>Some parents like to use a small plastic tub; others like to use a sink. If you buy a baby tub, try to get one that has a hole in the bottom, so that you can easily drain the water after bath time is over. There are even baby tubs that are made to fit into the kitchen sink. </p><p>When preparing for your baby's bath, make sure the room is warm enough, and remove any rings or other jewelry from your hands. Keep a cup, a baby washcloth, mild soap, baby shampoo, and a soft towel nearby. Use the cup to fill the bathtub with two to three inches of lukewarm water. Test the temperature of the water with the inside of your wrist. </p><p>Gently lower your baby into the water, making sure to support their head and neck with one of your hands. Use the washcloth without soap to wash baby's face. Then soap up and rinse their body. Your baby will enjoy their bath if you continually pour warm water over their body to keep them warm. </p><p>Wash your baby's hair with mild shampoo, and massage it into their entire scalp. Rinse the shampoo with your hands or a cup.</p><p>When you are finished washing your baby, wrap them in a towel and gently pat them dry. You may want to use some baby lotion so that their skin does not dry out. </p><h2>The big tub</h2><p>Once your baby is able to sit up by themselves or with minimal help, you may want to switch them to the family tub. Although this may seem daunting at first, especially since your baby is so small and slippery, the big tub can be great fun for a six-month-old.</p><p>Make sure the room is warm, and keep your baby's clothes on until the tub is filled with water. Keep a soft hooded towel, a washcloth, soap, shampoo, and tub toys close at hand, within arm's reach. Test the water temperature before putting your baby in the tub. If you dip your elbow or wrist into the bath water, the temperature should be warm, not hot. Then ease your baby into the water. Stay right beside your baby the entire time they take a bath. Do not leave for a second, as your baby can drown in just a small amount of water. </p><p>Here are some other helpful tips for making your baby's time in the big bath tub more fun:</p><ul><li>Use tub toys, plastic books, and plastic containers to keep your baby occupied while you wash them. Dry off the toys after each use, and store them in a dry place.</li><li>Don't splash your baby's face. While your baby may enjoy splashing around and having a grand old time, they will not like it if you splash water in their face. Splashing your baby's face can turn them off bath time altogether. </li><li>Don't pull out the stopper while your baby is still in the tub. Emptying the tub while your baby is still in it can cause a chill. It can also upset your baby. The noise of the water going down the drain can frighten them, and they may also worry that they will fall down the drain too. </li></ul><h2>Safety considerations for bath time</h2><p>Always make sure to remain within arm's reach of your baby when they are in the bathtub. Never leave them alone or in the care of another child while they are being bathed. Do not to ask babysitters to bathe your baby. </p><p>Last but not least, always remember that hot bath water can burn your baby's fragile skin. Make sure the water is warm, not hot, before you put your baby into the bathtub. Make sure that the hot water tap is not dripping, so that droplets will not fall onto your baby and cause a burn. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/bath_time_for_babies.jpgBath time for babies

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