Introducing solidsIIntroducing solidsIntroducing solidsEnglishNABaby (1-12 months)BodyDigestive systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZJoan Brennan-Donnan BASc, RDLaura Croxson, RDAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC8.0000000000000069.00000000000001109.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Find out when to start feeding a baby solid food and how to tell when they are ready to start eating solids. Tips for introducing solids are provided.</p><p>Around six months of age, you can begin to introduce solid foods into your baby's diet. Introducing solid foods before this age can be dangerous for your baby. Start slow and pay attention to the cues your baby is giving you.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Signs your baby is ready for solid foods include the ability to hold their head up when propped to sit, tongue thrust reflex has disappeared and your baby shows interest in food.</li> <li>Introduce new foods one at a time and wait a few days before introducing another one to see if your baby is reacting poorly to the new food.</li> <li>Continue breastfeeding or bottle feeding according to the same schedule your baby was already on.</li></ul>
الابتداء بتقديم الاطعمة الصلبةاالابتداء بتقديم الاطعمة الصلبةIntroducing solidsArabicNABaby (1-12 months)BodyDigestive systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZJoan Brennan-Donnan BASc, RD;Laura Croxson, RD;Andrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC8.0000000000000069.00000000000001109.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>اعرف متى تبدأ في اطعام الطفل الاطعمة الصلبة وكيفية معرفة متى يكون مستعداً للابتداء في تناول الاطعمة الصلبة. نصائح لتقديم الاطعمة الصلبة جرى تزويدها.</p>
让宝宝开始进食固体食物让宝宝开始进食固体食物Introducing solidsChineseSimplifiedNABaby (1-12 months)BodyDigestive systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZaJoan Brennan-Donnan BASc, RDLaura Croxson, RD 69.00000000000008.000000000000001109.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z观察何时给宝宝添加辅食以及怎样判断宝宝已经准备好吃辅食?以下关于添加辅食的建议可供参考。
讓寶寶開始進食固體食物讓寶寶開始進食固體食物Introducing SolidsChineseTraditionalNABaby (1-12 months)BodyDigestive systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZaJoan Brennan-Donnan BASc, RDLaura Croxson, RD 69.00000000000008.000000000000001109.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z觀察何時給寶寶添加輔食以及怎樣判斷寶寶已經準備好吃輔食?提供了關于添加輔食的若干建議。
Incorporación de alimentos sólidosIIncorporación de alimentos sólidosIntroducing SolidsSpanishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZJoan Brennan-Donnan BASc, RDLaura Croxson, RDAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC69.00000000000008.000000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Sepa cuándo comenzar a darle alimentos sólidos a un bebé y cómo saber cuándo está preparado para comerlos. Se brindan consejos para la incorporación de alime</p>
திடப் பொருட்களை அறிமுகம் செய்தல்திடப் பொருட்களை அறிமுகம் செய்தல்Introducing SolidsTamilNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZJoan Brennan-Donnan BASc, RDLaura Croxson, RDAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>குழந்தைக்கு எப்போது திட உணவை ஆரம்பிக்கவேண்டும் மற்றும் அவன் திட உணவுக்கு தயாராகிவிட்டான் என்பதை அறிந்துகொள்ளுங்கள்.</p>
ٹھوس غذاؤں کا متعارف کراناٹٹھوس غذاؤں کا متعارف کراناIntroducing SolidsUrduNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZJoan Brennan-Donnan BASc, RDLaura Croxson, RDAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC69.00000000000008.000000000000001109.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Zبچے کو ٹھوس غذا شروع کرنے اور کیسے معلوم ہو کہ آپ کا بچہ ٹھوس غذائیں کھانے کے لئے تیا ر ہے ، اس کے بارے میں جانیں۔ ٹھوس غذائیں متعارف کرانے کے بارے میں اشارات فراہم کئے جاتے ہیں۔
Introduire des aliments solidesIIntroduire des aliments solidesIntroducing solidsFrenchNABaby (1-12 months)BodyDigestive systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZJoan Brennan-Donnan BASc, RDLaura Croxson, RDAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC8.0000000000000069.00000000000001109.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Quand commencer à introduire des aliments solides dans l'alimentation de votre bébé et comment déterminer s’il est prêt. On y fournit des conseils sur l’introduction d’aliments solides. </p><p>Autour de l’âge de six mois, vous pouvez commencer à introduire les aliments solides à l’alimentation de votre bébé. Introduire les aliments solides avant cet âge peut être dangereux pour votre bébé. Commencez lentement en portant attention aux signes que votre bébé vous donne.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Si votre bébé tient sa tête vers le haut lorsqu’on l’assoit, qu’il a perdu son réflexe d’extrusion et qu’il démontre de l’intérêt pour la nourriture, il est alors probablement prêt à ingérer des aliments solides.</li> <li>Introduisez les nouveaux aliments un à la fois et attendez quelques jours avant d’introduire un autre aliment afin d’observer si votre bébé réagit mal aux nouveaux aliments.</li> <li>Continuez à allaiter ou à donner le biberon selon le même horaire suivi jusqu’à maintenant. </li></ul>

 

 

Introducing solids497.000000000000Introducing solidsIntroducing solidsIEnglishNABaby (1-12 months)BodyDigestive systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZJoan Brennan-Donnan BASc, RDLaura Croxson, RDAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC8.0000000000000069.00000000000001109.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Find out when to start feeding a baby solid food and how to tell when they are ready to start eating solids. Tips for introducing solids are provided.</p><p>Around six months of age, you can begin to introduce solid foods into your baby's diet. Introducing solid foods before this age can be dangerous for your baby. Start slow and pay attention to the cues your baby is giving you.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Signs your baby is ready for solid foods include the ability to hold their head up when propped to sit, tongue thrust reflex has disappeared and your baby shows interest in food.</li> <li>Introduce new foods one at a time and wait a few days before introducing another one to see if your baby is reacting poorly to the new food.</li> <li>Continue breastfeeding or bottle feeding according to the same schedule your baby was already on.</li></ul><h2>When to start solid food</h2><p>Many new parents wonder when is the right time to start their baby on solid food. They may receive advice from other parents to start early to help the baby sleep through the night. Grandparents may tell them to start as early as the first month, because that’s what they did in the past. However, while very early introduction to solids is not generally considered to be harmful, medical research has shown that your baby’s body is not ready to take in solids until about six months. According to the World Health Organization, "exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months is the optimal way of feeding infants. Thereafter, infants should receive complementary foods with continued breastfeeding up to two years of age or beyond." </p><p>Before six months, your baby’s digestive system is not mature enough to handle solids. Your baby’s tongue will push out any foreign substances like food; this is called the tongue reflex, and it protects young babies from choking on foreign bodies. The intestines lack important enzymes necessary for digestion. Certain foods are difficult for the digestive system to cope with; giving solids before six months of age leads to a higher risk of food allergies and intolerance. Also, starting your baby on solid food before age six months can lead to less frequent breastfeeding and a decreased milk supply. </p><p>If you give your baby solids before they are ready, they will reject the food, and this can set the stage for future mealtime struggles. Also, if there is a strong history of food allergies in your family, it is often a good idea to wait until your baby is about six months of age before beginning solids. </p><p>Don’t wait too long to start solids, though. Babies over six months are more set in their ways and less malleable. Therefore, they are less willing to accept the new flavours and textures of solids. They may resist learning to chew and swallow solids at this age. There is no good evidence at present that delaying solids for longer than six months will protect your baby from food allergies, asthma, or eczema. </p><p>Here are a few signs that your baby will show when they are ready to start eating solid food:</p><ul><li>He can hold their head up well when propped to sit. Strained foods can be given at this time. Do not offer strained solids to a baby who cannot hold up their head properly. Also, if your baby cannot sit up at all in the high chair, even when propped up by pillows and blankets, you may want to postpone beginning strained foods until later. When the baby is able to sit up by themselves, usually around seven months, you can start offering more chunky foods. </li><li>The tongue thrust reflex has disappeared. Try placing a small bit of rice cereal mixed with formula or breast milk in your baby’s mouth. If your baby’s tongue thrusts the food out, even after several tries, it means that the tongue reflex is still in place, and you should wait a bit longer before introducing solids. </li><li>Your baby is able to move food from the front to the back of their mouth using their tongue. This may take a bit of practice at first. </li><li>Your baby can draw in their lower lip and use this action to take food from a spoon. </li><li>Your baby shows interest in food. They may grab your fork, take your bread, point at your food, or watch intently whenever you take a bite. </li></ul><h2>Introducing solid food</h2><p>Baby’s first meal is a momentous occasion! But there is more to it than rolling out the high chair and getting the video camera ready. If you want to ensure that the occasion is happy and enjoyable, you will need to consider the timing and setting of that first meal. </p><h3>Timing is everything</h3><p>First of all, keep in mind that the first few months of solid feedings are really just a time to get your baby used to the taste and texture of food. The actual amount of food your baby eats is not all that important, as long as they continue to take breast or bottle feedings. In fact, the first few feedings will only be a teaspoon or two at most. </p><p>Choose a time when your baby is alert and happy, and not cranky or overtired. Feeding is time-consuming, so make sure you don’t schedule it for a time when you are busy with other chores. If there is one time during the day when your baby is usually hungry, you may want to give their feeding then. </p><h3>Starting out</h3><p>Start by giving them a bit of formula or breast milk to whet their appetite, so that they are not too hungry to endure the new experience. Don’t give them too much formula or breast milk, though, as that will curb their appetite. </p><p>Offer your baby a quarter of a teaspoon of food. Slip the spoon between their lips and see how they react. Your baby may open their mouth for more, in which case you can place the next bite a bit farther back for easier swallowing. On the other hand, the food might slide right back out. If this happens continually for the first few meals, consider that your baby might not yet be ready for solids. Try again in a week or so. If your baby is ready for solids, they will start to take in more than they spit out. </p><p>Introduce solids once per day for the first few days. Once your baby has mastered this, try introducing another meal and, in another few days, a third daily meal. </p><h3>When to stop the feeding</h3><p>If your baby starts to become fussy, turn their head away, clamp their mouth shut, spit out food, or throw food around, they are giving you signs that they are no longer hungry. Stop feeding them at this point, and don’t force them to continue eating. </p><h2>Foods to start with</h2><p>Around six months of age, try adding the following to your baby’s dietary repertoire, one food at a time:</p><ul><li>iron-fortified baby cereal, which comes in rice, barley, or oatmeal varieties. The cereal will come as little flakes and you can mix it with breast milk or formula. Try just a teaspoon of the cereal.</li><li>puréed meat and chicken</li><li>mashed, hard boiled egg yolk</li><li>well-cooked beans, lentils, and chickpeas</li><li>puréed vegetables such as peas, squash, sweet potatoes, carrots, cauliflower, broccoli, or green beans. It’s wise to introduce vegetables before your baby has a chance to get used to the sweeter taste of fruit. Babies tend to like yellow veggies such as squash and sweet potato more than the green ones like broccoli or green beans. Vegetables do not need to be fresh; they can be mashed up frozen or canned varieties too. When preparing veggies for your baby, resist the temptation to add salt or butter. </li><li>fruits, after your baby has accepted vegetables into their diet. Finely mashed or strained banana is a good choice, as is applesauce. Around this time, you can also start to introduce baby cereal mixed with fruit. </li></ul><p>Introduce new foods one by one. Wait a few days before introducing a new food and look out for adverse reactions such as diarrhea, vomiting, or rash. If your baby does have a problem, this will help you figure out which food might be responsible. </p><h2>Continuing breast or bottle feeding</h2><p>When you start feeding your baby solids, make sure to keep breast or bottle feeding as usual. Continue breastfeeding according to the same schedule that your baby was already on. Over time, as your baby starts eating more solid food, your breast milk supply will gradually decrease. This is nature’s way of weaning your baby. If you are bottle feeding, make sure your baby receives at least 480 mL (16 oz) of formula per day until they reach one year of age. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/introducing_solids.jpgIntroducing solids

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