Healthy eating for teensHHealthy eating for teensHealthy eating for teensEnglishDevelopmentalTeen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2020-03-23T04:00:00Z6.9000000000000063.50000000000001116.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Here are some helpful tips on how to meet the needs of a teen's growing body.</p><p>The teen years are a time of rapid growth. They need extra nutrients to support bone growth, hormonal changes, and organ and tissue development, including the brain. The two main nutrients of concern for teenagers are <a href="/article?contentid=1448&language=English">calcium</a> and <a href="/article?contentid=1450&language=English">iron</a>.​<br></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Teens need extra nutrients to support bone growth, hormonal changes and organ and tissue development, including the brain.</li><li>Teens should eat breakfast, drink water and limit highly processed food, sugary drinks and eating out.</li><li>Healthy eating habits and physical activity can help lower the risk of obesity.<br></li></ul>
Alimentation saine pour les adosAAlimentation saine pour les adosHealthy eating for teensFrenchDevelopmentalTeen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-05-06T04:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Les ados ne s'alimentent pas toujours correctement. Voici certains trucs utiles sur la façon de répondre aux besoins corporels pour une personne en croissance.</p><p>L'adolescence est une période de croissance rapide. Les adolescents ont davantage besoin de nutriments pour soutenir la croissance de leurs os, les changements hormonaux, le développement des organes et des tissus, y compris du cerveau. Les deux principaux nutriments d'importance pour les adolescents sont le <a href="/article?contentid=1448&language=French">calcium</a> et le <a href="/article?contentid=1450&language=French">fer</a>.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Les adolescents ont davantage besoin de nutriments pour soutenir la croissance de leurs os, les changements hormonaux, le développement des organes et des tissus, y compris du cerveau.</li> <li>Le calcium est un nutriment important pour les adolescents. Il contribue à la croissance des os. Hors mis les produits laitiers, on trouve du calcium dans les amandes, le broccoli cuit, le chou bok choy cuit et les figues.</li> <li>Le fer est aussi un nutriment important pour les ados. On le trouve dans le soja, les haricots cuits, les lentilles ainsi que le brocoli et le pak choi.</li> <li>Tous les ados, y compris les actifs, répondront à leurs besoins en nutriments en suivant les portions recommandées par le guide « Bien manger avec le Guide alimentaire canadien ».</li> <li>Afin de manger sainement, les ados devraient toujours déjeuner le matin tout en limitant la restauration rapide type fast food, les boissons gazeuses et le fait de manger à l'extérieur de chez soi.</li> <li>Des habitudes alimentaires saines et l'activité physique peuvent contribuer à diminuer le risque d'obésité.</li> </ul>

 

 

 

 

Healthy eating for teens638.000000000000Healthy eating for teensHealthy eating for teensHEnglishDevelopmentalTeen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2020-03-23T04:00:00Z6.9000000000000063.50000000000001116.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Here are some helpful tips on how to meet the needs of a teen's growing body.</p><p>The teen years are a time of rapid growth. They need extra nutrients to support bone growth, hormonal changes, and organ and tissue development, including the brain. The two main nutrients of concern for teenagers are <a href="/article?contentid=1448&language=English">calcium</a> and <a href="/article?contentid=1450&language=English">iron</a>.​<br></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Teens need extra nutrients to support bone growth, hormonal changes and organ and tissue development, including the brain.</li><li>Teens should eat breakfast, drink water and limit highly processed food, sugary drinks and eating out.</li><li>Healthy eating habits and physical activity can help lower the risk of obesity.<br></li></ul><h2>Calcium</h2><p>Calcium is important for bone growth. If teens optimize their bone health, they have a decreased risk of fractures and of developing osteoporosis during adulthood. Females are particularly at risk if they do not meet their calcium requirements. Females aged 13 to 17 have a daily recommended intake (DRI) of 1300 mg/day. Males of the same age meet their requirements at about 1400 mg/day. Most teens do not meet these daily requirements. </p><h3>The following chart lists various dairy and non-dairy sources of calcium:</h3><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Food item</th><th>Serving size</th><th>Amount of calcium (mg)</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Almonds</td><td>¼ cup (50 ml)</td><td>75</td></tr><tr><td>Bok choy, cooked</td><td>½ cup (125 ml)</td><td>85</td></tr><tr><td>Broccoli, cooked</td><td>½ cup (125 ml)</td><td>50</td></tr><tr><td>Figs</td><td>6 dried</td><td>150</td></tr><tr><td>Yogurt, fruit bottom</td><td>¾ cup (175 g)</td><td>215 to 280</td></tr><tr><td>Yogurt, plain</td><td>¾ cup (175 g)</td><td>265 to 320</td></tr><tr><td>Cheese</td><td>50g</td><td>355 to 435</td></tr><tr><td>Milk</td><td>1 cup (250 ml)</td><td>300 to 320</td></tr><tr><td>Orange juice fortified with calcium</td><td>½ cup (125 ml)</td><td>150</td></tr><tr><td>Rice or soy beverage, fortified</td><td>1 cup (250 ml)</td><td>300</td></tr><tr><td>Soybeans, cooked</td><td>½ cup (125 ml)</td><td>90</td></tr><tr><td>White beans</td><td>½ cup (125 ml)</td><td>100</td></tr><tr><td>Salmon, canned with bones</td><td>3oz</td><td>180</td></tr><tr><td>Sardines, canned with bones</td><td>4</td><td>180</td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Iron</h2><p>Iron is another important nutrient for teenagers. Teens need iron as they gain lean body mass. Females also need iron when they start <a href="/article?contentid=299&language=English">menstruating</a>. On average, male teens meet their iron requirements with little difficulty. However, females aged 13 to 17 barely meet their requirements of 15 mg per day. </p><h3>Females should try to increase their iron intake with some of the following suggestions:</h3><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Food item</th><th>Serving size</th><th>Amount of iron (mg)</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Soybeans, cooked</td><td>½ cup (125 ml)</td><td>4.4</td></tr><tr><td>Tofu, firm</td><td>½ cup (125 g)</td><td>6.6</td></tr><tr><td>Baked beans, cooked</td><td>½ cup (125 ml)</td><td>1.7</td></tr><tr><td>Chickpeas or kidney beans</td><td>½ cup (125 ml)</td><td>2.4 to 2.6</td></tr><tr><td>Lentils</td><td>½ cup (125 ml)</td><td>3.3</td></tr><tr><td>Lima/navy/pinto beans</td><td>½ cup (125 ml)</td><td>2.2</td></tr><tr><td>Almonds</td><td>¼ cup (60 ml)</td><td>1.5</td></tr><tr><td>Cashews</td><td>¼ cup (60 ml)</td><td>2.1</td></tr><tr><td>Cereal, fortified</td><td>28 g</td><td>2.1 to 18</td></tr><tr><td>Egg, hard-boiled</td><td>1 large (50 g)</td><td>0.59</td></tr><tr><td>Chicken breast, broiled</td><td>100 g</td><td>1.07</td></tr><tr><td>Beef, top sirloin, broiled</td><td>100 g</td><td>1.73</td></tr><tr><td>Apricots, dried</td><td>¼ cup (60 ml)</td><td>1.5</td></tr><tr><td>Dried figs or raisins</td><td>¼ cup (60 ml)</td><td>1.1</td></tr><tr><td>Bok choy</td><td>½ cup (125 ml)</td><td>0.9</td></tr><tr><td>Broccoli or kale</td><td>½ cup (125 ml)</td><td>0.6 to 0.7</td></tr><tr><td>Potato, baked with skin</td><td>1 medium (173 g)</td><td>2.3</td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Food habits</h2><p>Along with physical changes, teens become more independent as they grow. Dietary options are one of the first decisions teens start making on their own. However, some teens tend to make poor food choices. Overall, teens tend to fail to meet their daily recommended amounts of vegetables and fruits and whole grains. In addition, teens often have increased intake of highly processed foods and foods or drinks that are high in sugar, sodium and saturated fats (see below). </p><h3>How can I help my preteen or teen make healthy snacking choices?</h3><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wzMqPBJT_iI" frameborder="0"></iframe> <br></div><p>There are four major food habits of concern.<br></p><h3>Skipping breakfast</h3><p>Breakfast is an important meal of the day as it helps to ensure daily nutrient needs are being met. It also improves school performance and helps maintain a healthy weight. The majority of teens do not eat breakfast on a regular basis. </p><h3>Increased consumption of highly processed foods<br></h3><p>This includes foods such as soft drinks, snack foods, convenience foods and desserts. Everyone should aim to decrease their intake of these foods. However, for some teens, up to one half of their energy intake is from these other foods. This is of concern as highly processed foods are often high in fat, calories and sugar but are low in vitamins and minerals. </p><h3>Increased eating outside the home</h3><p>Eating outside the home has increased, and a lot of the foods consumed in restaurants are high in fat and calories, especially at fast food restaurants. There has been an increased consumption of pizza, cheese burgers, and salty snacks with teens, mostly due to eating out. Teens should aim to eat more food prepared within the home, especially snacks.<br></p><h3>Increased consumption of soft drinks <br></h3><p>A study looking at American youths aged 6 to 17 found soft drink consumption increased from 37 per cent in 1978 to 56 per cent in 1998. The increase in soft drink consumption could be attributed to the increase in restaurant eating.<br></p><h2>Active teens</h2><p>Active teens can get all the nutrients they need to play sports by following Canada's Food Guide. By doing so, they do not need to take supplements. Active teens may need a little more protein than inactive teens; however, this can be accomplished through diet alone. In fact, some protein supplements offer the same amount of protein found in a serving of meat, a half cup of tofu or a cup of milk. </p><p>Water is also important for active teens. Physical activity can make a teen <a href="/article?contentid=776&language=English">dehydrated</a>. Here are some tips on staying hydrated.<br></p><ul><li>Drink two to four cups of water one to two hours before physical activity. </li><li>Drink another two to four cups of water 10 to 15 minutes before physical activity. </li><li>Drink about a half cup of water every 15 minutes during physical activity. </li><li>Drink one to two cups of water after physical activity. </li><li>Remember to keep drinking water even if you don't feel thirsty. </li><li>Sports drinks and energy drinks are not usually necessary. For casual athletes, water is all you need.</li></ul><h2>Healthy eating tips for normal and overweight teens</h2><ul><li>Start by following Canada's Food Guide.</li><li>Increase intake of <a href="/article?contentid=1438&language=English">whole grains</a>, <a href="/article?contentid=1437&language=English">vegetables and fruits</a>. </li><li>Enjoy regular <a href="/article?contentid=642&language=English">physical activity</a>. </li><li>Eat three meals every day and enjoy snacks between meals. </li><li>Include protein-containing foods in meals and snacks.</li><li>Enjoy a variety of foods.</li><li>Choose healthy snacks such as vegetables and fruits, or baked snacks instead of fried. </li><li>Drink water instead of soft drinks, sugary juices or sports drinks. </li><li>Prepare food at home using whole grains, vegetables and fruits.</li><li>Limit foods high in sugar, sodium or saturated fat.</li><li>Eat <a href="/article?contentid=1942&language=English">fast food</a> and processed foods less often. </li><li>Eat when you're hungry; stop when you're full. </li><li>Pay attention to portion sizes. </li></ul><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/healthy_eating_for_teens.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/healthy_eating_for_teens.jpgHealthy eating for teensFalse