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Social and emotional development in school-age childrenSSocial and emotional development in school-age childrenSocial and emotional development in school-age childrenEnglishDevelopmentalSchool age child (5-8 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-12-14T05:00:00ZCynthia Goldfarb, MD, FRCPC;Lee Ford-Jones, MD, FRCP(C);Alissa Levy, PhD, Cpsych;Kristina Tocek, BA, MScOT000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>During the school-age years, your child continues to grow socially and emotionally. Find out more about this developmental phase, and whether your child is on track to achieving specific milestones.</p><p>As children enter the school-age years, they begin to show signs of a budding independence. This period of growth is also marked by the active pursuit of, and genuine appreciation for, new relationships. Parents, or primary caregivers, continue to be the most important people in their child’s life, but relationships with peers become increasingly important. In fact, the appearance of a “best friend” is considered a universal feature of the school-age years. Other significant, and often defining, characteristics of this phase of development are a child’s capacity to control their urges and conform to an appropriate standard of behaviour without direct supervision. Collectively, this is known as self-regulation.<br></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>​School-age children actively pursue new relationships and relationships with peers become increasingly important.</li><li>​Self-regulation or a child’s capacity to control their urges and conform to an appropriate standard of behaviour without direct supervision is also seen in school-age children.</li><li>Encourage your child to express their feelings, particularly when they show non-verbal signs of negative emotion.​</li></ul>
Développement social et émotionnel chez les enfants d’âge scolaireDDéveloppement social et émotionnel chez les enfants d’âge scolaireSocial and emotional development in school-age childrenFrenchDevelopmentalSchool age child (5-8 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-12-14T05:00:00ZCynthia Goldfarb, MD, FRCPC; Lee Ford-Jones, MD, FRCP(C); Alissa Levy, PhD, Cpsych; Kristina Tocek, BA, MScOT545.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Pendant son parcours scolaire, votre enfant continue de grandir socialement et émotionnellement. Apprendrez-en davantage sur cette étape développementale et découvrez s’il est en bonne voie de franchir certaines étapes déterminées.</p><p>Lorsque les enfants atteignent l’âge scolaire, ils commencent à montrer des signes de début d’indépendance. Cette période de croissance est aussi marquée par une recherche active de nouvelles relations et un intérêt authentique pour elles. Les parents ou les principaux gardiens continuent d’être les personnes les plus importantes dans la vie de l’enfant, mais les relations avec ses camarades deviennent de plus en plus importantes. En fait, l’apparition du « meilleur ami » est considérée comme une caractéristique universelle de l’âge scolaire. Une autre caractéristique importante, et souvent déterminante, de cette étape de développement est la capacité de l’enfant à contrôler ses envies et à se conformer à une norme comportementale appropriée sans supervision directe. Collectivement, elles constituent l’autorégulation.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Les enfants d’âge scolaire recherchent activement de nouvelles relations et les relations avec leurs camarades deviennent de plus en plus importantes.</li><li>L’autorégulation, ou la capacité d’un enfant à contrôler ses envies et à se conformer à une norme comportementale appropriée sans supervision directe, est aussi observée chez ces enfants.</li><li>Encouragez votre enfant à exprimer ses émotions, surtout lorsqu’il montre des signes non verbaux d’émotions négatives. ​</li></ul>

 

 

Social and emotional development in school-age children713.000000000000Social and emotional development in school-age childrenSocial and emotional development in school-age childrenSEnglishDevelopmentalSchool age child (5-8 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-12-14T05:00:00ZCynthia Goldfarb, MD, FRCPC;Lee Ford-Jones, MD, FRCP(C);Alissa Levy, PhD, Cpsych;Kristina Tocek, BA, MScOT000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>During the school-age years, your child continues to grow socially and emotionally. Find out more about this developmental phase, and whether your child is on track to achieving specific milestones.</p><p>As children enter the school-age years, they begin to show signs of a budding independence. This period of growth is also marked by the active pursuit of, and genuine appreciation for, new relationships. Parents, or primary caregivers, continue to be the most important people in their child’s life, but relationships with peers become increasingly important. In fact, the appearance of a “best friend” is considered a universal feature of the school-age years. Other significant, and often defining, characteristics of this phase of development are a child’s capacity to control their urges and conform to an appropriate standard of behaviour without direct supervision. Collectively, this is known as self-regulation.<br></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>​School-age children actively pursue new relationships and relationships with peers become increasingly important.</li><li>​Self-regulation or a child’s capacity to control their urges and conform to an appropriate standard of behaviour without direct supervision is also seen in school-age children.</li><li>Encourage your child to express their feelings, particularly when they show non-verbal signs of negative emotion.​</li></ul><h2>Milestones</h2> <h3>5- to 6-year-olds</h3> <ul><li>Are willing to play cooperatively, take turns, and share</li> <li>Show jealousy toward siblings </li> <li>Understand their own feelings</li> <li>Understand the consequences of their actions</li> <li>Enjoy playing alone, but prefer to play with friends</li> <li>Can dress themselves</li> <li>Are able to use words to describe their own feelings </li> <li>Show empathy and offer to help when they see another in distress</li> </ul> <h3>7- to 8-year-olds</h3> <ul> <li>Show a competitive spirit when playing games</li> <li>Befriend children of the opposite gender</li> <li>Show an interest in joining a club or sports team</li> <li>Form a sense of humour and enjoy telling jokes</li> <li>Can distinguish between fantasy and reality</li> <li>Are able to do pretend play with another child or group of children</li> <li>Help out with chores at home, such as clearing the table after a meal or tidying up personal belongings</li> </ul> <h2>Parenting tips</h2> <ul> <li>Self-regulation doesn’t happen overnight. However, children are very observant, so leading by example will help with their progression. Current research continues to support the belief that a parent’s own ability to self-regulate has a tremendous impact on their child.</li> <li>Teach and encourage your child to express their feelings, particularly when they show non-verbal signs of negative emotion: a slumped posture, prolonged fatigue, or obvious facial expressions.</li> <li>Praise your child when they continue to do things right, like picking up their toys, and always compliment them after a personal achievement.</li> <li>Establish clear family rules: for example, no hitting, no jumping on the furniture.</li> <li>Consistently use positive discipline strategies inside and outside the home.</li> <li>Encourage your child to play with other children, whether it is on the playground at school, a park, or on a sports team. Inviting peers over for play dates is a good idea, too.</li> </ul><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/social_emotional_development_school_age.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/social_emotional_development_school_age.jpgSocial and emotional development in school-age children

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