Sex education: What children should learn and whenSSex education: What children should learn and whenSex education: What children should learn and whenEnglishAdolescentToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-10-13T04:00:00ZMiriam Kaufman, MD000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>​​​When you talk to your child about sex and reproduction you want to be sure they understand what you are saying. This guide outlines what children are able to understand at different ages.</p><p>When talking to your kids about sex, make sure the conversation is age-appropriate.</p><ul><li>Explain things in a way that your child can understand, given their age.</li><li>Do not think you have to cover everything at once. Younger kids are interested in pregnancy and babies, rather than the act of sex.</li></ul> ​<h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>When talking to your children about sex, make sure you explain things in a way that is age-appropriate.​</li><li>You do not have to explain everything at once. Younger children tend to be more interested in pregnancy and babies, rather than the act of sex.</li></ul>
Éducation sexuelle: ce que les enfants doivent savoir et à quel momentÉÉducation sexuelle: ce que les enfants doivent savoir et à quel momentSex education: What children should learn and whenFrenchAdolescentToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-10-13T04:00:00ZMiriam Kaufman, MD000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Quand vous parlez à votre enfant de sexualité et de reproduction, assurez-vous qu’il comprend ce que vous dites. Ce guide indique ce que les enfants sont capables de comprendre à différents âges.</p><p>​Lorsque vous parlez de sexualité à votre enfant, assurez-vous que la conversation est adaptée à son âge.</p><h2>À retenir</h2>

 

 

Sex education: What children should learn and when716.000000000000Sex education: What children should learn and whenSex education: What children should learn and whenSEnglishAdolescentToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-10-13T04:00:00ZMiriam Kaufman, MD000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>​​​When you talk to your child about sex and reproduction you want to be sure they understand what you are saying. This guide outlines what children are able to understand at different ages.</p><p>When talking to your kids about sex, make sure the conversation is age-appropriate.</p><ul><li>Explain things in a way that your child can understand, given their age.</li><li>Do not think you have to cover everything at once. Younger kids are interested in pregnancy and babies, rather than the act of sex.</li></ul> ​<h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>When talking to your children about sex, make sure you explain things in a way that is age-appropriate.​</li><li>You do not have to explain everything at once. Younger children tend to be more interested in pregnancy and babies, rather than the act of sex.</li></ul><p>Read our <a href="/Article?contentid=717&language=English">tips for parents about sex education</a> and <a href="/Article?contentid=718&language=English">why sex education is important</a>.</p><p>Every child is different, but here is a rough guide to what children should be able to understand about sex and reproduction at different ages.</p><h2>Infancy: Up to two years</h2><p>Toddlers should be able to name all the body parts including the <a href="https://pie.med.utoronto.ca/htbw/module.html?module=sex-development">genitals</a>. </p><p>Most two-year-olds know the difference between male and female, and can usually figure out if a person is male or female.</p><h2>Early childhood: Two to five years old</h2><p>Children should understand the very basics of reproduction: a man and a woman make a baby together, and the baby grows in the woman’s uterus.</p><p>Children should understand their body is their own. Teach them about privacy around body issues. They should know other people can touch them in some ways but not other ways.</p><h2>Middle childhood: Five to eight years old</h2><p>Children should have a basic understanding that some people are heterosexual, homosexual, or bisexual. They should also know what the role of sexuality is in relationships.</p><p>Children should know about the basic social conventions of privacy, nudity, and respect for others in relationships.</p><p>Children should be taught the basics about puberty towards the end of this age span, as a number of children will experience some pubertal development before age 10.</p><p>Children’s understanding of <a href="https://pie.med.utoronto.ca/htbw/module.html?module=genetics/inheritanceintroduction/pages/humanreproduction.aspx">human reproduction​</a> should continue. This may include the role of sexual intercourse.</p><h2>Tween years: Nine to 12 years old</h2><p>In addition to reinforcing all the things above they have already learned, tweens should be taught about safer sex and contraception.</p><p>Tweens should understand what makes a positive relationship and what makes for a bad one.</p><p>Tweens should also learn to judge whether depictions of sex and sexuality in the media are true or false, realistic or not, and whether they are positive or negative.</p><h2>Teenagers: 13 to 18 years old</h2><p>Teens are generally very private people. However, if parents have spoken to their child early about sex, it increases the chance that teens will approach parents when difficult or dangerous things come up later.</p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/sex_education_what_when.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/sex_education_what_when.jpgSex education: What children should learn and when

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