AboutKidsHealth

 

 

Sex education for children: Eight tips for parentsSSex education for children: Eight tips for parentsSex education for children: Eight tips for parentsEnglishAdolescentToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-10-13T04:00:00ZMiriam Kaufman, MD000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Having 'the talk' isn't always easy. Advice for parents on talking to their kids about sex and reproduction.</p><p>​Beginning a conversation about sex early and continuing that conversation as the child grows is the best sex education strategy. It lets parents avoid giving one big talk when the child reaches adolescence, when it may already be too late. These conversations are easiest when they come out of a life experience, like seeing a pregnant woman or a baby.<br></p><p>Here are eight tips to try.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A good strategy is to start talking to your child about sex when they are young and continue that conversation as they get older.​</li><li>Explain things to your child in a way that is age-appropriate and do not provide them with too much information at once.​</li><li>Ask questions to find out exactly what your child wants to know about and why. <br></li><li>Be honest when talking with your child. Children can often figure out when parents are not telling them the truth. If this happens, children are less likely to be receptive in the future.<br></li></ul>
Éducation sexuelle des enfants: Huit conseils aux parentsÉÉducation sexuelle des enfants: Huit conseils aux parentsSex education for children: Eight tips for parentsFrenchAdolescentToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-10-13T04:00:00ZMiriam Kaufman, MD000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Parler de sexualité et de reproduction n’est pas toujours facile. Des conseils pour les parents sur la manière d’aborder le sujet avec leur enfant.</p><p>​​​En matière d’éducation sexuelle, la meilleure stratégie consiste à entamer tôt un dialogue sur la sexualité et à maintenir ce dialogue à mesure que votre enfant grandit. Ainsi, les parents n’ont pas à convoquer leur enfant à une seule grande conversation alors qu’il a déjà atteint l’adolescence et qu’il est peut-être déjà trop tard. Ces conversations sont plus simples lorsqu’elles sont inspirées d’expériences de vie, comme croiser une femme enceinte ou un bébé.</p><p>Voici quelques conseils.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Une bonne stratégie consiste à commencer à parler de sexualité avec votre enfant à un jeune âge et de poursuivre cette conversation à mesure qu’il grandit.</li><li>Expliquez-lui les choses selon ce qui est approprié à son âge et ne lui donnez pas trop de renseignements d’un seul coup.</li><li>Vous devrez peut-être lui poser des questions pour déterminer exactement ce qu’il cherche à savoir. Parfois, ils demandent d’où viennent les bébés ou veulent savoir ce que signifie « adopté ».</li><li>Soyez honnête avec votre enfant quand vous parlez avec lui. Les enfants peuvent souvent déterminer quand les parents ne leur disent pas la vérité. Si c’est le cas, ils seront moins susceptibles d’être réceptifs à l’avenir.</li></ul>

 

 

Sex education for children: Eight tips for parents717.000000000000Sex education for children: Eight tips for parentsSex education for children: Eight tips for parentsSEnglishAdolescentToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-10-13T04:00:00ZMiriam Kaufman, MD000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Having 'the talk' isn't always easy. Advice for parents on talking to their kids about sex and reproduction.</p><p>​Beginning a conversation about sex early and continuing that conversation as the child grows is the best sex education strategy. It lets parents avoid giving one big talk when the child reaches adolescence, when it may already be too late. These conversations are easiest when they come out of a life experience, like seeing a pregnant woman or a baby.<br></p><p>Here are eight tips to try.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A good strategy is to start talking to your child about sex when they are young and continue that conversation as they get older.​</li><li>Explain things to your child in a way that is age-appropriate and do not provide them with too much information at once.​</li><li>Ask questions to find out exactly what your child wants to know about and why. <br></li><li>Be honest when talking with your child. Children can often figure out when parents are not telling them the truth. If this happens, children are less likely to be receptive in the future.<br></li></ul><h3>1. Think about how you w​ere taught about sex as a child</h3><p>Ask yourself if you want your child to have the same or a different experience.</p><h3>2. Give age-appropriate answers</h3><p>This means explaining things in a way that your child can understand given their age. There is no need to answer questions they haven’t asked. Don’t overload them with information. They will glaze over and nothing will get through. See our <a href="/Article?contentid=716&language=English">guide to age-appropriate sex education</a>.</p><h3>3. Try to keep the exchange as a dialogue</h3><p>When kids ask questions about sex, gently throw questions back at them. Find out what they know already and where they heard it from. This way, you can correct any misinformation from the start. Dialogue slows conversation down, giving you time to think, and lets you have a better idea when to stop. </p><p>It is very important to find out exactly what children are actually asking about. Sometimes when they ask where babies come from, they really want to know what ‘adopted’ means.</p><h3>4. Be honest</h3><p>Children can often figure out when parents are not telling them the truth. If this happens, children are less likely to be receptive in the future.</p><p>Do not worry if you do not know the answer yourself. Tell your child that the question was a good one, that you do not know the whole answer, and that you can both look up the answer together. Again, this helps slow the conversation down.</p><h3>5. Read</h3><p>There are great, age-appropriate books about sex and reproduction for both parents and kids. Reading also helps get over any embarrassment.</p><h3>6. If your child hasn’t asked about sex, start the conversation</h3><p>Some kids are just naturally shy and don’t tend to ask a lot of questions about anything. Do not wait. Initiate a conversation with the child about sex. Ask them what they know and what is being taught at school. Use examples from nature. Even in the city, animals are courting and mating all around us. Addressing animal reproduction first is a great way to introduce and reinforce sex education about people.</p><h3>7. Keep your cool</h3><p>Get ready for the fact that sex talk will come up at badly timed moments, like in a bank line-up, and at full volume. Do not feel you have to answer, but rather say “great question, let’s talk about that in the car.” Moments like these are also a great opportunity to explain about privacy issues. As the child learns about sex, you can let them know that speaking about it everywhere is not appropriate.</p><p>The car can be a great place to speak with your child about sex. The fact that you are both staring straight ahead may take some of the embarrassment out of the conversation. Sitting side by side on a park bench will do the same thing.</p><p>If your child asks you personal questions, answer in the abstract. Tell them you understand their curiosity but some things are a private part of your life. For example, if they ask if moms and dads have sex every night they go to bed together, you can answer that when people sleep together that does not necessarily mean that they are having sex.</p><h3>8. Remember that sex education is a continuing process</h3><p>Children will need some things repeated in order to understand. Keep talking.​​​<br></p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/sex_education_tips_for_parents.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/sex_education_tips_for_parents.jpgSex education for children: Eight tips for parentsFalse

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.