EaracheEEaracheEaracheEnglishOtolaryngologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)EarsNervous systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Decreased hearing;Earache;Fever;Pain2015-04-24T04:00:00ZElly Berger, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE8.0000000000000069.0000000000000616.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the causes and treatment of earaches.</p><h2>What is earache?</h2> <p>Earache can be a sharp, dull, or burning pain in one or both ears. This pain can last for a short or long time. Earache is common in children.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>An earache can be a sharp, dull or burning pain in one or both ears that can last for a short or long time.</li> <li>Earaches are often caused by ear and other upper respiratory infections. Other causes include impacted earwax or injury.</li> <li>You can help relieve a child's earache by encouraging them to swallow if the earache is due to changes in altitude. You can give over-the-counter pain medications if the earache is due to infection or injury.</li> <li>Get medical help right away if your child has severe pain and fever, if they have new or worsening symptoms or if they have fluid or blood oozing from the ear. </li> </ul><h2>Causes of earache</h2><p>The Eustachian tubes connect the ears to back of the mouth, near the throat. Short-term changes in pressure in one or both Eustachian tubes are one of the most common causes of earache. The changes in pressure occur when a child has an <a href="/article?contentid=12&language=English">upper respiratory infection</a>, such as the common cold or a throat, ear or sinus infection.</p><h3>Ear infections</h3><p>An <a href="/article?contentid=8&language=English">ear infection</a> occurs when there is swelling or build-up of fluids in the middle ear, most often from a viral or bacterial infection. It is also called otitis media. The middle ear is the space between the eardrum and inner ear.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Otitis media</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_otitis_media_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">In otitis media, the Eustachian tube is blocked. Fluid and pressure then build up in the middle ear. This makes the eardrum bulge outward and causes pain.</figcaption> </figure> <p>A child with an ear infection displays some of the following common signs and symptoms:</p><ul><li>ear pain</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a></li><li>fussiness</li><li>irritability</li><li>pulling or rubbing the ear</li><li>increased <a href="/Article?contentid=448&language=English">crying</a></li><li>trouble sleeping</li><li>fluid draining from the ear</li><li>difficulty hearing</li></ul><h3>Other possible causes of earache</h3><ul><li>Pressure changes in the ears (for example during take-off or landing in a plane or if there is a lot of mucus in the sinuses)</li><li>Injury to the ear</li><li>Irritation from a foreign object in the ear</li><li>Impacted (packed-in) ear wax in the ear canal, usually caused by using cotton swabs incorrectly</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=747&language=English">Swimmer's ear (otitis externa)</a></li></ul><h2>How to treat your child’s earache</h2> <p>If your child has an earache on an airplane, have them chew gum or swallow to help relieve the pressure in their ears. If your child is an infant, allowing them to suck on a bottle or breastfeed while the plane lands may ease their discomfort.</p> <p>If your child is diagnosed with an ear infection, and they are under six months of age, the doctor will prescribe antibiotics. If your child is older than six months and they have only mild discomfort and a low-grade fever, your doctor might decide to wait for two or three days to see if the ear infection gets better on its own. If your child is older than six months, but they are in a lot of pain or have a high fever, the doctor might decide to start the antibiotic treatment right away.</p> <p>You can give over-the-counter pain medications such as <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> or <a href="/article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a> to reduce your child’s pain. Only give ibuprofen if your child is drinking reasonably well. Do not give ibuprofen to babies under 6 months without first talking to your doctor.</p><h2>When to call a doctor for earache</h2> <p>See a doctor if:</p> <ul> <li>your child has severe pain and fever</li> <li>your child's symptoms get worse over the next 24 to 48 hours</li> <li>your child has dizziness, severe headaches, stiff neck or swelling around or behind the ear</li> <li>your child has fluid or blood oozing from the ear</li> </ul>

 

 

Earache750.000000000000EaracheEaracheEEnglishOtolaryngologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)EarsNervous systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Decreased hearing;Earache;Fever;Pain2015-04-24T04:00:00ZElly Berger, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, MHPE8.0000000000000069.0000000000000616.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the causes and treatment of earaches.</p><h2>What is earache?</h2> <p>Earache can be a sharp, dull, or burning pain in one or both ears. This pain can last for a short or long time. Earache is common in children.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>An earache can be a sharp, dull or burning pain in one or both ears that can last for a short or long time.</li> <li>Earaches are often caused by ear and other upper respiratory infections. Other causes include impacted earwax or injury.</li> <li>You can help relieve a child's earache by encouraging them to swallow if the earache is due to changes in altitude. You can give over-the-counter pain medications if the earache is due to infection or injury.</li> <li>Get medical help right away if your child has severe pain and fever, if they have new or worsening symptoms or if they have fluid or blood oozing from the ear. </li> </ul><h2>Causes of earache</h2><p>The Eustachian tubes connect the ears to back of the mouth, near the throat. Short-term changes in pressure in one or both Eustachian tubes are one of the most common causes of earache. The changes in pressure occur when a child has an <a href="/article?contentid=12&language=English">upper respiratory infection</a>, such as the common cold or a throat, ear or sinus infection.</p><h3>Ear infections</h3><p>An <a href="/article?contentid=8&language=English">ear infection</a> occurs when there is swelling or build-up of fluids in the middle ear, most often from a viral or bacterial infection. It is also called otitis media. The middle ear is the space between the eardrum and inner ear.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Otitis media</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_otitis_media_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">In otitis media, the Eustachian tube is blocked. Fluid and pressure then build up in the middle ear. This makes the eardrum bulge outward and causes pain.</figcaption> </figure> <p>A child with an ear infection displays some of the following common signs and symptoms:</p><ul><li>ear pain</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a></li><li>fussiness</li><li>irritability</li><li>pulling or rubbing the ear</li><li>increased <a href="/Article?contentid=448&language=English">crying</a></li><li>trouble sleeping</li><li>fluid draining from the ear</li><li>difficulty hearing</li></ul><h3>Other possible causes of earache</h3><ul><li>Pressure changes in the ears (for example during take-off or landing in a plane or if there is a lot of mucus in the sinuses)</li><li>Injury to the ear</li><li>Irritation from a foreign object in the ear</li><li>Impacted (packed-in) ear wax in the ear canal, usually caused by using cotton swabs incorrectly</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=747&language=English">Swimmer's ear (otitis externa)</a></li></ul><h2>How to treat your child’s earache</h2> <p>If your child has an earache on an airplane, have them chew gum or swallow to help relieve the pressure in their ears. If your child is an infant, allowing them to suck on a bottle or breastfeed while the plane lands may ease their discomfort.</p> <p>If your child is diagnosed with an ear infection, and they are under six months of age, the doctor will prescribe antibiotics. If your child is older than six months and they have only mild discomfort and a low-grade fever, your doctor might decide to wait for two or three days to see if the ear infection gets better on its own. If your child is older than six months, but they are in a lot of pain or have a high fever, the doctor might decide to start the antibiotic treatment right away.</p> <p>You can give over-the-counter pain medications such as <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> or <a href="/article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a> to reduce your child’s pain. Only give ibuprofen if your child is drinking reasonably well. Do not give ibuprofen to babies under 6 months without first talking to your doctor.</p><h2>When to call a doctor for earache</h2> <p>See a doctor if:</p> <ul> <li>your child has severe pain and fever</li> <li>your child's symptoms get worse over the next 24 to 48 hours</li> <li>your child has dizziness, severe headaches, stiff neck or swelling around or behind the ear</li> <li>your child has fluid or blood oozing from the ear</li> </ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_otitis_media_EN.jpgEarache

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