Soy allergySSoy allergySoy allergyEnglishAllergyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2014-12-18T05:00:00ZVy Kim, MD, FRCPC;Anna Kasprzak, RN​9.0000000000000060.00000000000001022.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Find out how to help your child manage a soy allergy.</p><h2>What is a soy allergy?</h2><p>Soy products come from the soybean. An allergy to soy occurs when the body reacts to one or more of the proteins in soybeans.</p><p>The soybean is a nutritious vegetable that can be made into tofu, soy milk, soy flour and much more. It rarely causes <a href="/Article?contentid=781&language=English"> anaphylaxis</a>, but its use in so many food products makes a serious reaction more likely.</p><p>Soy is one of the most common foods that cause an allergic reaction. Those with a soy allergy must avoid all soy products and all soy ingredients.</p>​ <h2>Will my child always have a soy allergy?</h2><p>A soy allergy is most common in infancy and usually develops at three months of age. Many children with a soy allergy outgrow it by school age, but this does not always happen.</p><p>An allergist (a doctor who specializes in diagnosing and treating allergies) can help you find out when to test your child and see whether they have outgrown their allergy.</p><h2>Milk and soy allergies</h2><p>Some infants develop an allergy both to milk and soy. If an infant is allergic to milk and soy, they will need to start on a hypoallergenic formula and continue taking it even after they start solid foods. The hypoallergenic formula contains proteins that are already broken down. This helps infants to digest the formula without having an allergic reaction.</p><p>Brands of hypoallergenic formula include Alimentum, Nutramigen and Pregestimil, but these are suggested formulas only. If your child has a milk or soy allergy, speak with your doctor or dietitian before deciding which formula to use.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Many children with a soy allergy outgrow it by school age. An allergist can identify whether your child's allergy has changed.</li> <li>Soy has many names, including tempeh, tofu, textured vegetable protein and miso. Many different products contain soy, including sauces, snack foods, bread and pastries, spray cooking oils and baby formula. </li> <li>To prevent an allergic reaction, always read food product labels, avoid foods if you are not sure of the ingredients and avoid using utensils or containers that might have come in contact with soy.</li> <li>If your child has a soy allergy, a registered dietitian can offer advice on getting a balanced diet. </li> </ul><h2>Possible sources of soy</h2> <p>Soy is used in a range of packaged foods. Below is a list of some of the many food products that contain soy.</p> <table class="akh-table"> <tbody> <tr> <td>Baby formula</td> <td>Baked goods and baking mixes (including bread, cookies, cake mixes, donuts or pancakes)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Bean sprouts</td> <td>Bread crumbs, cereals or crackers</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Breaded foods</td> <td>Canned tuna</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Chewing gum</td> <td>Cooking spray, margarine and vegetable shortening/oil</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Dressings, gravies, marinades</td> <td>Frozen desserts</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Hydrolyzed plant protein (HPP), hydrolyzed soy protein (HSP) or hydrolyzed vegetable protein (HVP) - may contain soy, wheat, corn or peanut as the source of protein</td> <td>Lecithin, a food additive that acts to emulsify foods or keep them from spoiling – can be made from soybeans, eggs or corn (call the manufacturer if soy is not stated)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Monosodium glutamate (MSG)</td> <td>Peanut butter</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Sauces (soy, teriyaki, Worcestershire)</td> <td>Seafood-based products</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Seasonings, spices</td> <td>Snack foods - candy, chocolate, fudge, popcorn, potato chips</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Soups, broths, soup mixes, stews, stock</td> <td>Soybean oil - highly refined oil is considered safe because the soy protein has been removed, but it is still best to avoid it, especially if it is a main ingredient </td> </tr> <tr> <td>Spreads and dips</td> <td>Textured soy flour (TSF)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Textured soy protein (TSP)</td> <td>Vegetarian packaged dishes</td> </tr> </tbody> </table><h2>Reducing the risk of cross-contamination</h2><p>Cross-contamination occurs when a harmless substance comes in contact with a harmful substance such as a potential allergen or harmful bacteria. If the substances mix together, the harmful substance taints the other substance, making it unsafe to eat.</p><p>Food allergens can contaminate other foods when, for example, the same containers, utensils or frying pans hold a range of foods. </p><p>Bulk food containers pose a high risk of cross-contamination because they are often used for different products.</p><p>Be sure to avoid using utensils or containers that may have come in contact with allergy-causing foods and ask about possible cross-contamination when eating out.</p><h2>How can my child get the right mix of nutrients if they must avoid soy?</h2><p>The main nutrients in soy include protein, omega-3 fatty acids, folate, iron, calcium, vitamin D, zinc, fibre and B vitamins. Your child can still get these nutrients even if they must avoid soy.</p><h3>Nutrients in soy that are found in other foods</h3><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Nutrient</th><th>Where to find it</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Protein</td><td>Meat, fish, poultry, cheese, milk, egg</td></tr><tr><td>Omega-3</td><td>Salmon, tuna, mackerel, walnuts, ground flax seeds, canola oil, omega-3 fortified eggs, whole grain bread, cow's milk</td></tr><tr><td>Folate</td><td>Leafy green vegetables, beans (navy, pinto, kidney, garbanzo), lentils</td></tr><tr><td>Iron</td><td>Meat, shrimp, poultry, beans (navy, pinto, kidney, garbanzo), whole wheat products, green leafy vegetables</td></tr><tr><td>Calcium</td><td>Cow's milk, cheese, yogurt, calcium fortified orange juice, broccoli, salmon with bones, almonds</td></tr><tr><td>Vitamin D</td><td>Fortified margarine, salmon, egg yolk, cow's milk</td></tr><tr><td>Zinc</td><td>Meat, fish, poultry, whole grains, vegetables</td></tr><tr><td>Fibre</td><td>Whole grains, fruits, vegetables</td></tr><tr><td>B vitamins</td><td>Whole grain bread, cereal, pasta, rice</td></tr></tbody></table><h2>When to see a dietitian for a soy allergy</h2> <p>If you have removed many foods from your child's diet because of a soy allergy, it may be a good idea to speak to a registered dietitian. The dietitian can review the foods your child still eats to decide if they are getting enough nutrients. If necessary, they can also recommend alternative foods that your child can eat safely. </p><h2>​Further information</h2> <p>Health Canada. <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/food-nutrition/reports-publications/food-safety/priority-food-allergen.html">Soy - A priority food allergen</a></p>
Allergie au sojaAAllergie au sojaSoy allergyFrenchAllergyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2014-12-18T05:00:00ZVy Kim, MD, FRCPC;Anna Kasprzak, RN​9.0000000000000060.00000000000001022.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Comment aider votre enfant à gérer son allergie au soya.</p><h2>Qu’est-ce qu’une allergie au soya?</h2><p>Les produits de soya sont issus de la graine de soya. Une allergie au soya se produit quand le corps réagit à une ou plusieurs des protéines contenues dans les graines de soya.</p><p>Le soya est un légume nutritif qui peut être transformé en tofu, en lait de soya, en farine de soya et bien plus. Il est rarement la cause d’<a href="/Article?contentid=781&language=French">anaphylaxie</a>, mais comme ses graines sont utilisées dans tellement de produits alimentaires, une réaction grave est plus susceptible de se produire.</p><p>Le soya est l’un des aliments de base qui causent le plus fréquemment une réaction allergique. Les personnes aux prises avec une allergie au soya doivent éviter de consommer tous les produits et tous les ingrédients à base de soya.</p><h2>Mon enfant sera-t-il toujours atteint d’une allergie au soya?</h2><p>Une allergie au soya est plus fréquente en bas âge et survient habituellement vers l’âge de 3 mois. Chez plusieurs enfants atteints, l’allergie au soya disparaît avant l’âge scolaire, mais ce n’est pas toujours le cas.</p><p>Un allergologue (un médecin qui se spécialise dans le diagnostic et le traitement des allergies) peut vous aider à déterminer le bon moment de tester votre enfant afin de déterminer si son allergie a disparu.</p><h2>Allergies au lait et au soya</h2> <p>Certains bébés développent une allergie à la fois au lait et au soya. Si un bébé est allergique au lait et au soya, il devra recevoir une préparation pour nourrisson hypoallergénique et continuer à la prendre même lorsqu’il commencera à ingérer des aliments solides. Les préparations hypoallergéniques contiennent des protéines qui ont déjà été fractionnées. Ceci aide les enfants à mieux digérer la préparation pour nourrisson sans déclencher de réaction allergique.</p><p>On suggère les marques Alimentum, Nutramigen et Pregestimil qui sont des préparations hypoallergéniques, mais il en existe d’autres. Si votre enfant est aux prises avec une allergie au lait ou au soya, consultez votre médecin ou votre nutritionniste avant de choisir votre préparation pour nourrisson.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>L’allergie au soya disparaît avant l’âge scolaire chez la plupart des enfants. Un allergologue peut déterminer l’état de l’allergie de votre enfant.</li><li>Le soya peut se retrouver sous différents noms, dont le tempeh, le tofu, les protéines végétales texturées et le miso. De nombreux produits contiennent du soya, y compris les sauces, les grignotines, le pain et les pâtisseries, les huiles de cuisson en aérosol et les préparations pour nourrisson.</li><li>Afin de prévenir une réaction allergique, lisez toujours les étiquettes des produits alimentaires, évitez certains aliments si vous n’êtes pas certain des ingrédients qu’ils contiennent et évitez d’utiliser des ustensiles ou des contenants qui pourraient avoir été en contact avec du soya.</li><li>Si votre enfant est aux prises avec une allergie au soya, un nutritionniste peut vous conseiller afin d’équilibrer son alimentation.</li></ul><h2>Sources de soya potentielles</h2><p>Le soya est intégré à un large éventail d’aliments emballés. Vous trouverez ci-dessous une liste de quelques-uns des nombreux produits alimentaires contenant du soya :</p><table class="akh-table"><tbody><tr><td>préparation pour nourrisson;</td><td>produits de boulangerie et mélange à pâtisseries (y compris du pain, des biscuits, des préparations pour gâteaux, des beignes ou des crêpes);</td></tr><tr><td>fèves germées;</td><td>miettes de pain, céréales à déjeuner ou craquelin;</td></tr><tr><td>panure;</td><td>thon en conserve;</td></tr><tr><td>gomme à mâcher;</td><td>aérosol de cuisson, margarine et shortening/huile végétale;</td></tr><tr><td>vinaigrettes, sauces, marinades;</td><td>desserts glacés;</td></tr><tr><td>protéines végétales hydrolysées (PVH) ou protéines de soya hydrolysées (PSH) — peut contenir du soya, du blé, du maïs ou des arachides comme source de protéine;</td><td>lécithine, un additif alimentaire servant à émulsifier les aliments ou à mieux les conserver - peut être fabriqué de graines de soya, d’œufs ou de maïs (appelez le manufacturier si le mot « soya » n’est pas mentionné);</td></tr><tr><td>glutamate monosodique (GMS);</td><td>beurre d’arachides;</td></tr><tr><td>sauces (soya, teriyaki, Woscestershire)</td><td>produits à base de fruits de mer;</td></tr><tr><td>assaisonnements, épices;</td><td>grignotines — bonbon, chocolat, fudge, maïs soufflé, croustilles;</td></tr><tr><td>soupes, bouillons, mélanges de soupes, ragoûts, fond;</td><td>huile de soya — huile fortement raffinée et considérée comme sécuritaire puisque les protéines de soya ont été enlevées, mais il est préférable de l’éviter, surtout si c’est l’un des ingrédients principaux.</td></tr><tr><td>tartinades et trempettes;</td><td>farine de soya texturée (FST);</td></tr><tr><td>protéine de soya texturée (PST)</td><td>plats végétariens emballés.</td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Réduire le risque de contamination croisée</h2><p>La contamination croisée se produit lorsqu’une substance inoffensive entre en contact avec une substance nocive, un allergène potentiel ou une bactérie nuisible, par exemple. Si les substances se mélangent, la substance nocive altère l’autre substance, la rendant non sécuritaire à la consommation.</p><p>Les allergènes alimentaires peuvent contaminer d’autres aliments lorsque, par exemple, les mêmes contenants, ustensiles ou poêles entrent en contact avec une variété d’aliments.</p><p>Les contenants d’aliments en vrac entraînent un risque élevé de contamination croisée puisqu’ils sont souvent utilisés pour différents produits.</p><p>Assurez-vous d’éviter d’utiliser des ustensiles ou des contenants qui pourraient être entrés en contact avec des aliments pouvant causer des allergies et informez-vous des contaminations croisées possibles lorsque vous mangez à l’extérieur.</p><h2>Comment puis-je m’assurer que mon enfant reçoit tous les nutriments nécessaires s’il doit éviter le soya?</h2><p>Les principaux nutriments contenus dans le soya sont des protéines, des oméga 3, du folate, du fer, du calcium, de la vitamine D, du zinc, des fibres et des vitamines du groupe B. Votre enfant peut tout de même obtenir ces nutriments même s’il doit éviter le soya.</p><h3>Les nutriments présents dans le soya que l’on retrouve dans d’autres aliments</h3><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Nutriment</th><th>Où le trouver</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Protéine</td><td>Viande, poisson, volaille, fromage, lait, œuf</td></tr><tr><td>Oméga 3</td><td>Saumon, thon, maquereau, noix, graine de lin moulue, huile de canola, œufs enrichis en oméga 3, pain à grains entiers, lait de vache</td></tr><tr><td>Folate</td><td>Légumes feuillus verts, légumineuses (haricots blancs, haricots pinto, haricots rouges, pois chiches) et lentilles</td></tr><tr><td>Fer</td><td>Viande, crevettes, volaille, légumineuses (haricots blancs, haricots pinto, haricots rouges, pois chiches), produits de blé entier, légumes feuillus verts</td></tr><tr><td>Calcium</td><td>Lait de vache, fromage, yogourt, jus d’orange enrichi en calcium, brocoli, saumon avec les arêtes, amandes</td></tr><tr><td>Vitamine D</td><td>margarine enrichie, saumon, jaune d’œuf, lait de vache</td></tr><tr><td>Zinc</td><td>Viande, poisson, volaille, grains entiers, légumes</td></tr><tr><td>Fibre</td><td>Grains entiers, fruits, légumes</td></tr><tr><td>Vitamines du groupe B</td><td>Pain de blé entier, céréales à déjeuner, pâtes alimentaires, riz</td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Quand consulter un nutritionniste à propos d’une allergie au soya?</h2><p>Si vous avez retiré plusieurs aliments de l’alimentation de votre enfant en raison d’une allergie au soya, vous devriez consulter un nutritionniste. Il peut examiner les aliments que votre enfant a conservés dans son alimentation afin de vérifier s’il obtient les nutriments dont il a besoin. Si nécessaire, il peut recommander des aliments de remplacement que votre enfant peut manger en toute sécurité.</p><h2>​Informations complémentaires</h2><p>Santé Canada. <a href="https://www.canada.ca/fr/sante-canada/services/aliments-nutrition/rapports-publications/salubrite-aliments/soja-allergene-alimentaire-prioritaire.html">Soja - Allergène alimentaire prioritaire</a></p>

 

 

Soy allergy805.000000000000Soy allergySoy allergySEnglishAllergyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2014-12-18T05:00:00ZVy Kim, MD, FRCPC;Anna Kasprzak, RN​9.0000000000000060.00000000000001022.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Find out how to help your child manage a soy allergy.</p><h2>What is a soy allergy?</h2><p>Soy products come from the soybean. An allergy to soy occurs when the body reacts to one or more of the proteins in soybeans.</p><p>The soybean is a nutritious vegetable that can be made into tofu, soy milk, soy flour and much more. It rarely causes <a href="/Article?contentid=781&language=English"> anaphylaxis</a>, but its use in so many food products makes a serious reaction more likely.</p><p>Soy is one of the most common foods that cause an allergic reaction. Those with a soy allergy must avoid all soy products and all soy ingredients.</p>​ <h2>Will my child always have a soy allergy?</h2><p>A soy allergy is most common in infancy and usually develops at three months of age. Many children with a soy allergy outgrow it by school age, but this does not always happen.</p><p>An allergist (a doctor who specializes in diagnosing and treating allergies) can help you find out when to test your child and see whether they have outgrown their allergy.</p><h2>Milk and soy allergies</h2><p>Some infants develop an allergy both to milk and soy. If an infant is allergic to milk and soy, they will need to start on a hypoallergenic formula and continue taking it even after they start solid foods. The hypoallergenic formula contains proteins that are already broken down. This helps infants to digest the formula without having an allergic reaction.</p><p>Brands of hypoallergenic formula include Alimentum, Nutramigen and Pregestimil, but these are suggested formulas only. If your child has a milk or soy allergy, speak with your doctor or dietitian before deciding which formula to use.</p><h2>Other names for soy</h2><p>Soy can have many names in ingredient lists. Learning these names can help you catch any hidden sources of soy in food.</p><p>When buying packaged foods, always check the list of ingredients in the store and again when you bring the product home. It is also a good idea to check the ingredients every time you buy the food in case the recipe has changed. You can also call the manufacturer to ask about any recipe changes.</p><p>The following table lists some of the names for soy. Use it when you are grocery shopping or calling food manufacturers.</p><table class="akh-table"><tbody><tr><td>Edamame</td><td>Miso</td><td>Mono-diglyceride</td></tr><tr><td>Natto</td><td>Okara</td><td>Soya, soja, soybean, soyabean</td></tr><tr><td>Soy protein (isolate/concentrate)</td><td>Tempeh</td><td>Textured vegetable protein (TVP) or vegetable protein - soy may be the source of protein</td></tr><tr><td>Tofu (soybean curds)</td><td>Yuba</td><td></td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Many children with a soy allergy outgrow it by school age. An allergist can identify whether your child's allergy has changed.</li> <li>Soy has many names, including tempeh, tofu, textured vegetable protein and miso. Many different products contain soy, including sauces, snack foods, bread and pastries, spray cooking oils and baby formula. </li> <li>To prevent an allergic reaction, always read food product labels, avoid foods if you are not sure of the ingredients and avoid using utensils or containers that might have come in contact with soy.</li> <li>If your child has a soy allergy, a registered dietitian can offer advice on getting a balanced diet. </li> </ul><h2>Possible sources of soy</h2> <p>Soy is used in a range of packaged foods. Below is a list of some of the many food products that contain soy.</p> <table class="akh-table"> <tbody> <tr> <td>Baby formula</td> <td>Baked goods and baking mixes (including bread, cookies, cake mixes, donuts or pancakes)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Bean sprouts</td> <td>Bread crumbs, cereals or crackers</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Breaded foods</td> <td>Canned tuna</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Chewing gum</td> <td>Cooking spray, margarine and vegetable shortening/oil</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Dressings, gravies, marinades</td> <td>Frozen desserts</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Hydrolyzed plant protein (HPP), hydrolyzed soy protein (HSP) or hydrolyzed vegetable protein (HVP) - may contain soy, wheat, corn or peanut as the source of protein</td> <td>Lecithin, a food additive that acts to emulsify foods or keep them from spoiling – can be made from soybeans, eggs or corn (call the manufacturer if soy is not stated)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Monosodium glutamate (MSG)</td> <td>Peanut butter</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Sauces (soy, teriyaki, Worcestershire)</td> <td>Seafood-based products</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Seasonings, spices</td> <td>Snack foods - candy, chocolate, fudge, popcorn, potato chips</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Soups, broths, soup mixes, stews, stock</td> <td>Soybean oil - highly refined oil is considered safe because the soy protein has been removed, but it is still best to avoid it, especially if it is a main ingredient </td> </tr> <tr> <td>Spreads and dips</td> <td>Textured soy flour (TSF)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Textured soy protein (TSP)</td> <td>Vegetarian packaged dishes</td> </tr> </tbody> </table><h2>Reducing the risk of cross-contamination</h2><p>Cross-contamination occurs when a harmless substance comes in contact with a harmful substance such as a potential allergen or harmful bacteria. If the substances mix together, the harmful substance taints the other substance, making it unsafe to eat.</p><p>Food allergens can contaminate other foods when, for example, the same containers, utensils or frying pans hold a range of foods. </p><p>Bulk food containers pose a high risk of cross-contamination because they are often used for different products.</p><p>Be sure to avoid using utensils or containers that may have come in contact with allergy-causing foods and ask about possible cross-contamination when eating out.</p><h2>How can my child get the right mix of nutrients if they must avoid soy?</h2><p>The main nutrients in soy include protein, omega-3 fatty acids, folate, iron, calcium, vitamin D, zinc, fibre and B vitamins. Your child can still get these nutrients even if they must avoid soy.</p><h3>Nutrients in soy that are found in other foods</h3><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Nutrient</th><th>Where to find it</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Protein</td><td>Meat, fish, poultry, cheese, milk, egg</td></tr><tr><td>Omega-3</td><td>Salmon, tuna, mackerel, walnuts, ground flax seeds, canola oil, omega-3 fortified eggs, whole grain bread, cow's milk</td></tr><tr><td>Folate</td><td>Leafy green vegetables, beans (navy, pinto, kidney, garbanzo), lentils</td></tr><tr><td>Iron</td><td>Meat, shrimp, poultry, beans (navy, pinto, kidney, garbanzo), whole wheat products, green leafy vegetables</td></tr><tr><td>Calcium</td><td>Cow's milk, cheese, yogurt, calcium fortified orange juice, broccoli, salmon with bones, almonds</td></tr><tr><td>Vitamin D</td><td>Fortified margarine, salmon, egg yolk, cow's milk</td></tr><tr><td>Zinc</td><td>Meat, fish, poultry, whole grains, vegetables</td></tr><tr><td>Fibre</td><td>Whole grains, fruits, vegetables</td></tr><tr><td>B vitamins</td><td>Whole grain bread, cereal, pasta, rice</td></tr></tbody></table><h2>When to see a dietitian for a soy allergy</h2> <p>If you have removed many foods from your child's diet because of a soy allergy, it may be a good idea to speak to a registered dietitian. The dietitian can review the foods your child still eats to decide if they are getting enough nutrients. If necessary, they can also recommend alternative foods that your child can eat safely. </p><h2>​Further information</h2> <p>Health Canada. <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/food-nutrition/reports-publications/food-safety/priority-food-allergen.html">Soy - A priority food allergen</a></p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/soy_allergy.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/soy_allergy.jpgSoy allergy

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