Egg allergyEEgg allergyEgg allergyEnglishAllergyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2014-12-18T05:00:00ZVy Kim, MD, FRCPC;Anna Kasprzak, RN​7.0000000000000067.00000000000001081.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Find out how to help your child manage an egg allergy.</p><h2>What is an egg allergy?</h2><p>An egg allergy occurs when the body reacts to one or more of the proteins in eggs.</p><p>Most allergic reactions occur in response to ovalbumin and ovomucoid, the proteins in egg whites. Sometimes, the proteins in egg yolks can also cause an allergic reaction.</p><p>Eggs are one of the most common foods that cause an allergic reaction. For those with an egg allergy, any food made with eggs can be dangerous. People with an egg allergy can still enjoy a wide range of foods every day, but they must learn how to eat safely.</p> ​ <h2>Will my child always have an egg allergy?</h2><p>Many children with an egg allergy outgrow it by school age, but this does not always happen.</p><p>An allergist (a doctor who specializes in diagnosing and treating allergies) can help you find out when to test your child. Consult them regularly to check if there have been any changes to your child's food allergy.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Many children with an egg allergy outgrow it by school age. Consult an allergist regularly to see if there is any change in your child's allergy.</li> <li>Eggs have a number of names, including albumen, lysozyme and ingredients starting with "ova". Many products contain eggs, including baby food, baked goods, sauces, fat substitutes and some pastas.</li> <li>To prevent an allergic reaction, always read food product labels, avoid foods if you are not sure of the ingredients and avoid using utensils or containers that might have come in contact with eggs.</li> <li>If your child's diet is limited because of an egg allergy, a registered dietitian can offer advice on getting a balanced diet.</li> </ul><h2>Possible sources of egg</h2> <p>Eggs are used in a range of packaged foods and in some drinks. Below is a list of some of the many food products that contain eggs.</p> <table class="akh-table"> <tbody> <tr> <td>Alcoholic cocktails or drinks (such as sweet Marsala), eggnog, foam or milk topping on coffee</td> <td>Baby food​</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Baked goods, baking mixes, candy, chocolate or nougat</td> <td>Battered or fried foods</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Creamy dressings, salad dressings or spreads such as mayonnaise</td> <td>Desserts such as custard, dessert mixes, ice cream or pudding</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Egg substitutes, such as Egg Beaters</td> <td>Fat substitutes, such as Simplesse</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Icing, glazes (such as egg wash on baked goods)</td> <td>Lecithin</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Meat mixtures such as hamburger, hot dogs, meatballs, meatloaf or salami​</td> <td>Pancakes, waffles or French toast</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Pasta, such as egg noodles</td> <td>Quiche or souffle</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Sauces such as béarnaise, hollandaise or newburg</td> <td>Soups​</td> </tr> </tbody> </table><h2>Reducing the risk of cross-contamination</h2> <p>Cross-contamination occurs when a harmless substance comes in contact with a harmful substance, for example a potential allergen or harmful bacteria. If the substances mix together, the harmful substance taints the other substance, making it unsafe to eat.</p> <p>Food allergens can contaminate other foods when, for example, the same containers, utensils or frying pans hold a range of foods.</p> <p>Bulk food containers pose a high risk of cross-contamination because they are often used for different products.</p> <p>Be sure to avoid using utensils or containers that may have come in contact with allergy-causing foods and ask about possible cross-contamination when eating out.</p> <h2>How can my child get the right mix of nutrients if they must avoid eggs?</h2> <p>The main nutrients in eggs include protein, <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1449&language=English">folate</a>, <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1446&language=English">vitamin B12</a>, <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1452&language=English">zinc</a> and <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1450&language=English">iron</a>. Your child can still get these nutrients even if they must avoid eggs and products that contain them.</p> <h3>Nutrients in eggs that are found in other foods</h3> <table class="akh-table"> <thead> <tr><th>Nutrient</th><th>​Where to find it</th></tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>Protein​</td> <td>Meat, fish, poultry, cheese, milk, soy</td> </tr> <tr> <td>​Folate</td> <td>Leafy green vegetables, beans (navy, pinto, kidney, garbanzo), lentils</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Vitamin B12</td> <td>Meat, fish, poultry, shellfish, milk, cheese, fortified cereal, soy milk</td> </tr> <tr> <td>​Zinc</td> <td>Meat, fish, poultry, whole grains, vegetables</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Iron​</td> <td>Meat, shrimp, poultry, beans (navy, pinto, kidney, garbanzo), whole wheat products, leafy green vegetables</td> </tr> </tbody> </table><br><h2>When to see a dietitian for an egg allergy</h2> <p>If you have removed many foods from your child's diet because of an egg allergy, it may be a good idea to speak to a registered dietitian. The dietitian can review the foods your child still eats to decide if they are getting enough nutrients. If necessary, they can also recommend alternative foods that your child can eat safely.</p><h2>At SickKids</h2> <p>Kingsmill Egg Replacer is a commercial product that you can use for baking and cooking. Each 350 g box replaces 100 eggs. You can buy this product at the Specialty Food Shop on the main floor of the hospital.</p> <p>For more information on living with food allergies, visit the Specialty Food Shop: <a href="http://www.specialtyfoodshop.ca/">www.specialtyfoodshop.ca</a><br></p><h2>Further information</h2><p>Here is a list of reliable resources that can help you become aware of potential risks and how to deal with them.</p><ul><li>Allergy/Asthma Information Association. <a href="http://aaia.ca/en/egg_brochure_en.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Allergies to eggs</em></a></li><li>Safe4Kids. <a href="http://www.safe4kids.ca/content/parents/ProductSafety.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Is this product safe? Check it out!</em></a></li><li>Health Canada. <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/food-nutrition/reports-publications/food-safety/eggs-priority-food-allergen.html" target="_blank"><em>Eggs – A priority food allergen</em></a></li><li>Health Canada. <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/food-nutrition/food-safety/food-allergies-intolerances.html" target="_blank"><em>Food allergies​ and intolerances</em></a></li></ul>
Allergies aux œufsAAllergies aux œufsEgg allergyFrenchAllergyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2014-12-18T05:00:00ZVy Kim, MD, FRCPC;Anna Kasprzak, RN​7.0000000000000067.00000000000001081.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Comment aider votre enfant à gérer son allergie aux œufs.</p><h2>​Qu’est-ce qu’une allergie aux œufs?</h2><p>Une allergie aux œufs se produit quand le corps réagit à une ou plusieurs des protéines contenues dans les œufs.</p><p>La plupart des réactions allergiques se produisent en réponse à l’ovalbumine et l’ovomucoïde, les protéines présentes dans les blancs d’œufs. Parfois, les protéines présentes dans les jaunes d’œufs peuvent aussi causer une réaction allergique.</p><p>Les œufs sont l’un des aliments de base qui causent le plus fréquemment une réaction allergique. Pour les personnes atteintes d’une allergie aux œufs, tout aliment préparé avec des œufs peut être dangereux. Ces personnes peuvent tout de même consommer un large éventail d’aliments chaque jour, mais elles doivent apprendre à manger de manière sécuritaire.</p> <h2>Mon enfant sera-t-il toujours atteint d’une allergie aux œufs?</h2><p>Chez plusieurs enfants atteints, l’allergie aux œufs disparaît avant l’âge scolaire, mais ce n’est pas toujours le cas.</p><p>Un allergologue (un médecin qui se spécialise dans le diagnostic et le traitement des allergies) peut vous aider à déterminer le bon moment de tester votre enfant. Consultez-le de manière régulière afin de vérifier si des changements se sont produits dans l’allergie alimentaire de votre enfant.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Plusieurs enfants atteints d’une allergie aux œufs la voient disparaître avant l’âge scolaire. Consultez un allergologue de manière régulière afin de vérifier si des changements se sont produits dans l’allergie alimentaire de votre enfant.</li><li>Les œufs portent des noms différents, y compris albumen, lysozyme et les ingrédients dont le nom commence par « ova ». Plusieurs produits contiennent des œufs, y compris la nourriture pour bébé, les produits de boulangerie, les sauces, les substituts de matière grasse et certaines pâtes alimentaires.</li><li>Afin de prévenir une réaction allergique, lisez toujours les étiquettes des produits alimentaires, évitez certains aliments si vous n’êtes pas certain des ingrédients qu’ils contiennent et évitez d’utiliser des ustensiles ou des contenants qui pourraient avoir été en contact avec des œufs.</li><li>Si l’alimentation de votre enfant est limitée en raison de son allergie aux œufs, un nutritionniste peut vous conseiller afin d’équilibrer son alimentation.</li></ul><h2>Sources d’œufs potentielles</h2><p>Les œufs sont intégrés à un large éventail d’aliments emballés de même qu’à certaines boissons. Vous trouverez ci-dessous une liste de quelques-uns des nombreux produits alimentaires contenant des œufs :</p><table class="akh-table"><tbody><tr><td>Les cocktails ou les boissons alcoolisés (comme le Marsala doux), le lait de poule et le nappage de mousse ou de lait sur le café</td><td>La nourriture pour bébé</td></tr><tr><td>Les produits de boulangerie, les mélanges à pâtisserie, les bonbons, le chocolat ou le nougat</td><td>Les aliments panés ou frits</td></tr><tr><td>Les vinaigrettes crémeuses, les sauces pour salade ou les tartinades telles que la mayonnaise</td><td>Les desserts comme la crème anglaise, les préparations pour desserts, la crème glacée ou les flans</td></tr><tr><td>Les substituts d’œuf, tel que le Egg Beaters</td><td>Les substituts de matière grasse</td></tr><tr><td>Les dorures et les glaçages (tel que la dorure d’œufs sur les produits de boulangerie)</td><td>Lécithine</td></tr><tr><td>Les mélanges à base de viande comme les hamburgers, les hot-dogs, les boulettes de viande, les pains de viande ou le salami​</td><td>Les crêpes, les gaufres ou le pain doré</td></tr><tr><td>Les pâtes comme les nouilles aux œufs</td><td>Les quiches ou les soufflés</td></tr><tr><td>Les sauces comme la sauce béarnaise, la sauce hollandaise ou la sauce Newburg;</td><td>Les soupes</td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Réduire le risque de contamination croisée</h2><p>La contamination croisée se produit lorsqu’une substance inoffensive entre en contact avec une substance nocive, un allergène potentiel ou une bactérie nuisible, par exemple. Si les substances se mélangent, la substance nocive altère l’autre substance, la rendant non sécuritaire à la consommation.</p><p>Les allergènes alimentaires peuvent contaminer d’autres aliments lorsque, par exemple, les mêmes contenants, ustensiles ou poêles entrent en contact avec une variété d’aliments.</p><p>Les contenants d’aliments en vrac entraînent un risque élevé de contamination croisée puisqu’ils sont souvent utilisés pour différents produits.</p><p>Assurez-vous d’éviter d’utiliser des ustensiles ou des contenants qui pourraient être entrés en contact avec des aliments pouvant causer des allergies et informez-vous des contaminations croisées possibles lorsque vous mangez à l’extérieur.</p><h2>Comment puis-je m’assurer que mon enfant reçoit tous les nutriments nécessaires s’il doit éviter les œufs?</h2><p>Les principaux nutriments contenus dans les œufs comprennent les protéines, le <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1449&language=French">folate</a>, la <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1446&language=French">vitamine B12</a>, le <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1452&language=French">zinc</a> et le <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1450&language=French">fer</a>. Votre enfant peut obtenir ces nutriments même s’il doit éviter les œufs et les produits qui en contiennent.</p><h3>Les nutriments présents dans les œufs que l’on retrouve dans d’autres aliments</h3><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Nutriment</th><th>Où le trouver</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Protéine</td><td>Viande, poisson, volaille, fromage, lait, soya</td></tr><tr><td>​Folate</td><td>Légumes feuillus verts, légumineuses (haricots blancs, haricots pinto, haricots rouges, pois chiches) et lentilles</td></tr><tr><td>Vitamine B12</td><td>Viande, poisson, volaille, mollusques et crustacés, lait, fromage, céréales à déjeuner enrichies, lait de soya</td></tr><tr><td>​Zinc</td><td>Viande, poisson, volaille, grains entiers, légumes</td></tr><tr><td>Fer​</td><td>Viande, crevettes, volaille, légumineuses (haricots blancs, haricots pinto, haricots rouges, pois chiches), produits de blé entier, légumes feuillus verts</td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Quand consulter un nutritionniste à propos d’une allergie aux œufs</h2><p>Si vous avez retiré plusieurs aliments de l’alimentation de votre enfant en raison d’une allergie aux œufs, vous devriez consulter un nutritionniste. Le nutritionniste peut examiner les aliments que votre enfant a conservés dans son alimentation afin de vérifier s’il obtient les nutriments dont il a besoin. Si nécessaire, il peut recommander des aliments de remplacement que votre enfant peut manger en toute sécurité.</p> <h2>À l'hôpital SickKids</h2><p>Kingsmill Egg Replacer est un produit commercial utilisé en cuisine et en pâtisserie. Chaque boîte de 350 g remplace 100 œufs. Vous pouvez acheter ce produit dans l’épicerie spécialisée située au rez-de-chaussée de l’hôpital. </p> <p>Pour plus de renseignements sur la prise en charge des allergies alimentaires, visitez notre épicerie spécialisée à l’adresse : <a href="http://www.specialtyfoodshop.ca/">www.specialtyfoodshop.ca</a>.</p><h2>Informations complémentaires</h2><p>Voici une liste de ressources fiables qui peuvent vous sensibiliser aux risques potentiels et à la façon de leur faire face.</p><ul><li>Allergie/Asthme Association d'Information. <a href="http://aaia.ca/fr/egg_brochure_fr.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Allergies aux œufs</em></a></li><li>Safe4Kids. <a href="http://www.safe4kids.ca/content/parents/ProductSafety.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Is this product safe? Check it out!</em></a></li><li>Santé Canada. <a href="https://www.canada.ca/fr/sante-canada/services/aliments-nutrition/rapports-publications/salubrite-aliments/oeufs-allergene-alimentaire-prioritaire.html" target="_blank"><em>Œuf - Allergène alimentaire prioritaire</em></a></li><li>Santé Canada. <a href="https://www.canada.ca/fr/sante-canada/services/aliments-nutrition/salubrite-aliments/allergies-alimentaires-intolerances-alimentaires.html" target="_blank"><em>Les allergies alimentaires et les intolérances alimentaires​</em></a><br></li></ul>

 

 

Egg allergy806.000000000000Egg allergyEgg allergyEEnglishAllergyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2014-12-18T05:00:00ZVy Kim, MD, FRCPC;Anna Kasprzak, RN​7.0000000000000067.00000000000001081.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Find out how to help your child manage an egg allergy.</p><h2>What is an egg allergy?</h2><p>An egg allergy occurs when the body reacts to one or more of the proteins in eggs.</p><p>Most allergic reactions occur in response to ovalbumin and ovomucoid, the proteins in egg whites. Sometimes, the proteins in egg yolks can also cause an allergic reaction.</p><p>Eggs are one of the most common foods that cause an allergic reaction. For those with an egg allergy, any food made with eggs can be dangerous. People with an egg allergy can still enjoy a wide range of foods every day, but they must learn how to eat safely.</p> ​ <h2>Will my child always have an egg allergy?</h2><p>Many children with an egg allergy outgrow it by school age, but this does not always happen.</p><p>An allergist (a doctor who specializes in diagnosing and treating allergies) can help you find out when to test your child. Consult them regularly to check if there have been any changes to your child's food allergy.</p><h2>Other names for eggs</h2> <p>Eggs or egg products can have many names in ingredient lists. Learning these names can help you catch any hidden sources of egg in food.</p> <p>When buying packaged foods, always check the list of ingredients in the store and again when you bring the product home. It is also a good idea to check the ingredients every time you buy the food in case the recipe has changed. You can also call the manufacturer to ask about any recipe changes.</p> <p>The following table lists some names for eggs. Use it when you are grocery shopping or calling food manufacturers.</p> <table class="akh-table"> <tbody> <tr> <td>Albumin or albumen​</td> <td>Ovolactohydrolyze proteins</td> <td>Conalbumin</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Ovomacroglobulin</td> <td>Ovomucin or ovomucoid</td> <td>Globulin</td> </tr> <tr> <td>​Ovotransferrin</td> <td>Livetin</td> <td>Ovovitellin</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Lysozyme</td> <td>Silico-albuminate</td> <td>Ovoglobulin</td> </tr> <tr> <td>​Vitellin</td> <td>Ovalbumin</td> <td> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Many children with an egg allergy outgrow it by school age. Consult an allergist regularly to see if there is any change in your child's allergy.</li> <li>Eggs have a number of names, including albumen, lysozyme and ingredients starting with "ova". Many products contain eggs, including baby food, baked goods, sauces, fat substitutes and some pastas.</li> <li>To prevent an allergic reaction, always read food product labels, avoid foods if you are not sure of the ingredients and avoid using utensils or containers that might have come in contact with eggs.</li> <li>If your child's diet is limited because of an egg allergy, a registered dietitian can offer advice on getting a balanced diet.</li> </ul><h2>Possible sources of egg</h2> <p>Eggs are used in a range of packaged foods and in some drinks. Below is a list of some of the many food products that contain eggs.</p> <table class="akh-table"> <tbody> <tr> <td>Alcoholic cocktails or drinks (such as sweet Marsala), eggnog, foam or milk topping on coffee</td> <td>Baby food​</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Baked goods, baking mixes, candy, chocolate or nougat</td> <td>Battered or fried foods</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Creamy dressings, salad dressings or spreads such as mayonnaise</td> <td>Desserts such as custard, dessert mixes, ice cream or pudding</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Egg substitutes, such as Egg Beaters</td> <td>Fat substitutes, such as Simplesse</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Icing, glazes (such as egg wash on baked goods)</td> <td>Lecithin</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Meat mixtures such as hamburger, hot dogs, meatballs, meatloaf or salami​</td> <td>Pancakes, waffles or French toast</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Pasta, such as egg noodles</td> <td>Quiche or souffle</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Sauces such as béarnaise, hollandaise or newburg</td> <td>Soups​</td> </tr> </tbody> </table><h2>Reducing the risk of cross-contamination</h2> <p>Cross-contamination occurs when a harmless substance comes in contact with a harmful substance, for example a potential allergen or harmful bacteria. If the substances mix together, the harmful substance taints the other substance, making it unsafe to eat.</p> <p>Food allergens can contaminate other foods when, for example, the same containers, utensils or frying pans hold a range of foods.</p> <p>Bulk food containers pose a high risk of cross-contamination because they are often used for different products.</p> <p>Be sure to avoid using utensils or containers that may have come in contact with allergy-causing foods and ask about possible cross-contamination when eating out.</p> <h2>How can my child get the right mix of nutrients if they must avoid eggs?</h2> <p>The main nutrients in eggs include protein, <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1449&language=English">folate</a>, <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1446&language=English">vitamin B12</a>, <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1452&language=English">zinc</a> and <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1450&language=English">iron</a>. Your child can still get these nutrients even if they must avoid eggs and products that contain them.</p> <h3>Nutrients in eggs that are found in other foods</h3> <table class="akh-table"> <thead> <tr><th>Nutrient</th><th>​Where to find it</th></tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>Protein​</td> <td>Meat, fish, poultry, cheese, milk, soy</td> </tr> <tr> <td>​Folate</td> <td>Leafy green vegetables, beans (navy, pinto, kidney, garbanzo), lentils</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Vitamin B12</td> <td>Meat, fish, poultry, shellfish, milk, cheese, fortified cereal, soy milk</td> </tr> <tr> <td>​Zinc</td> <td>Meat, fish, poultry, whole grains, vegetables</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Iron​</td> <td>Meat, shrimp, poultry, beans (navy, pinto, kidney, garbanzo), whole wheat products, leafy green vegetables</td> </tr> </tbody> </table><br><h2>Baking without eggs</h2> <p>It is possible to make your favourite recipes with commercial or homemade egg substitutes. These substitutes tend to work best in recipes that use about one or two eggs. Feel free to adjust the following substitutions.</p> <table class="akh-table"> <thead> <tr><th>Substitute</th><th>Type of product</th><th>Comments</th></tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="3">Apricots and water</td> </tr> <tr> <td><p>Soak 227 g apricots in 500 mL (2 cups) water overnight. Beat in blender. Store in refrigerator.</p> <p>15 mL = 1 egg</p></td> <td>Sweet breads, rolls</td> <td>Adds flavour to product</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="3">Baking powder and sour cream</td> </tr> <tr> <td>2 mL baking powder and 125 mL sour cream = 1 egg</td> <td>Cookies, spice cakes, chocolate cakes</td> <td>Not appropriate in other products.</td> </tr> <tr> <td>5 mL baking soda + 5 mL vinegar = 1 egg</td> <td>Cookies, white cakes, loaves</td> <td>Limit use to recipes calling for one egg.</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="3">Cornstarch</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 mL = 1 egg</td> <td>Custard</td> <td>Acts as a thickener.</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="3">Ground flax seeds and water</td> </tr> <tr> <td><p>Mix 1/3 cup ground flax seed in 1 cup water. Bring mixture to a boil. Simmer for 3 minutes. Refrigerate.</p> <p>15 mL of the mixture = 1 egg</p></td> <td>White cakes (where milk is the liquid used), pancakes, muffins, cookies</td> <td>Clear and tasteless. Products are moist and have good texture. If recipe needs two or three eggs, this replacement will make product too moist. Not for use with angel food cakes.</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="3">Flour, baking powder, and shortening</td> </tr> <tr> <td>50 mL flour + 5 mL baking powder + 15 mL shortening = 1 egg</td> <td>Baked goods</td> <td>Not appropriate in shortcakes.</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="3">Mashed banana</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Half an average size = 1 egg</td> <td>Cakes, muffins, quick breads</td> <td>Adds flavour to product. Product may be gummy.</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="3">Vinegar</td> </tr> <tr> <td>15 mL = 1 egg</td> <td>Baked goods</td> <td>Products will stale quickly, use within four days. Freeze until used.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table><h2>When to see a dietitian for an egg allergy</h2> <p>If you have removed many foods from your child's diet because of an egg allergy, it may be a good idea to speak to a registered dietitian. The dietitian can review the foods your child still eats to decide if they are getting enough nutrients. If necessary, they can also recommend alternative foods that your child can eat safely.</p><h2>At SickKids</h2> <p>Kingsmill Egg Replacer is a commercial product that you can use for baking and cooking. Each 350 g box replaces 100 eggs. You can buy this product at the Specialty Food Shop on the main floor of the hospital.</p> <p>For more information on living with food allergies, visit the Specialty Food Shop: <a href="http://www.specialtyfoodshop.ca/">www.specialtyfoodshop.ca</a><br></p><h2>Further information</h2><p>Here is a list of reliable resources that can help you become aware of potential risks and how to deal with them.</p><ul><li>Allergy/Asthma Information Association. <a href="http://aaia.ca/en/egg_brochure_en.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Allergies to eggs</em></a></li><li>Safe4Kids. <a href="http://www.safe4kids.ca/content/parents/ProductSafety.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Is this product safe? Check it out!</em></a></li><li>Health Canada. <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/food-nutrition/reports-publications/food-safety/eggs-priority-food-allergen.html" target="_blank"><em>Eggs – A priority food allergen</em></a></li><li>Health Canada. <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/food-nutrition/food-safety/food-allergies-intolerances.html" target="_blank"><em>Food allergies​ and intolerances</em></a></li></ul><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/egg_allergy.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/egg_allergy.jpgEgg allergy

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