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Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP)RRetinopathy of prematurity (ROP)Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP)EnglishOphthalmologyPrematureEyesNervous systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2021-09-10T04:00:00Z7.5000000000000064.70000000000001168.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn what retinopathy of prematurity is, how it is diagnosed and how it may be treated.</p><p>Your premature baby needs an eye exam by a paediatric ophthalmologist. This person is an eye doctor who specializes in checking and treating retina problems in children, including retina problems. This exam is important because premature babies may develop a condition called retinopathy (say: ret-in-OP-uh-thee) of prematurity, or ROP.<br></p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Retinopathy of prematurity, or ROP, is caused when small abnormal blood vessels form in your premature baby's eye(s). </li> <li>The vessels can lead to bleeding and scarring. They may also cause the retina to move from its normal place in the eye. This is called retinal detachment.</li> <li>Your baby's eyes will be checked often for any changes. It is important to keep eye appointments, as abnormal vessels can form quickly. </li> <li>Treatments depend on your child's condition. </li> </ul><h2>What can happen if a baby has ROP </h2><p>Abnormal vessels can lead to bleeding and scarring in the retina. They may also cause the retina to separate, or move, from its normal place in the eye. This is called retinal detachment. This could lead to poor vision or even blindness.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">ROP with retinal detachment</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/ROP_retinal_detachment_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="The anatomy of an eye with retinal detachment along the top and bottom" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">ROP may cause the retina to separate from its normal place in the eye.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>How common is ROP?</h2><p>Nobody really knows why abnormal blood vessels form. Some premature babies need oxygen to help them breathe. It is thought this oxygen treatment may play a part in ROP, even when it is closely monitored.</p><p>Not all premature babies have ROP. Babies born before 28 weeks or who weigh less than 1000 g at birth are at the highest risk for developing severe ROP. The risk of ROP developing also depends on how well the retina has formed.</p><h2>Checking your baby for ROP</h2><p>In Canada, all premature babies with a birth weight of 1250 g or less, or who are born at or before 30 weeks and six days are routinely examined for ROP. They will likely be examined initially at four to six weeks after birth. </p><p>The doctor will check your baby's eyes for any abnormal vessels. If these vessels are treated in time, it may help to stop retinal detachment.</p><p>Here is what you can expect to happen during the exam.</p><ul><li>Your baby will have special eye drops to make the pupils bigger. The pupil is the dark area in the centre of the coloured part of the eye. The drops take 30 minutes to an hour to work, sometimes longer. </li><li>Since your baby needs to be very still when their eyes are checked, they will be wrapped in a blanket and held down gently.</li><li>The doctor will check the retina using an instrument with a bright light called an ophthalmoscope (say: op-THAL-mo-scope). </li><li>Your baby will have eye drops to numb the surface of the eyeball.</li><li>Once the eyeball is numb, the doctor will use an instrument called a speculum to hold your baby's eyelids apart. This is because your baby is too young to keep their eyes open.</li><li>To get a good look at the eye, the doctor will also use an instrument called a depressor to gently move the eyeball. </li></ul><h3>Your baby should not feel any pain</h3><p>Being held down and having a bright light shone in their eyes will make your baby uncomfortable. They may cry during the exam, but they should not feel any pain.</p><h2>Explaining the condition of your baby's eyes</h2><p>After the exam, the doctor will explain the condition of your baby's eyes. Your baby's condition will be graded depending on how much the abnormal blood vessels have grown. The doctor will use the terms "zone" and "stage".</p><ul><li>The zone is graded from 1 to 3. This explains how far the blood vessels have grown on the retina. Vessels go from Zone 1 to 3 as they grow. The second image on this page shows the zones. </li><li>The stage explains the severity of the ROP. It is graded from 1 to 5. Stage 1 is the best (least severe) and stage 5 is the worst (most severe). </li><ul><li><p><strong>Stage 1 ROP</strong></p><p>In Stage 1, there is a thin line between the area with blood vessels and the area where the blood vessels have not grown yet. At this stage, the vessels may grow normally on their own, but the condition must be watched.</p></li><li><p><strong>Stage 2 ROP</strong></p><p>In Stage 2, the line between the areas with and without blood vessels widens and thickens into a ridge. The condition may still resolve, or it may progress to Stage 3 ROP.</p></li><li><p><strong>Stage 3 ROP</strong></p><p>In Stage 3, new blood vessels begin to grow along the ridge and extend into the clear gel that fills the eye, called vitreous body. These blood vessels can bleed and form scar tissue. </p></li><li><p><strong>Stage 4A ROP</strong></p><p>In Stage 4A, the abnormal blood vessels and scar tissue pull on the retina, partially detaching it. The centre of vision, called fovea (say: FOH-vee-uh), is not involved.</p></li><li><p><strong>Stage 4B ROP</strong></p><p>The retina is still only partially detached, but the fovea is affected. This usually leaves both the centre and peripheral vision impaired to some degree.</p></li><li><p><strong>Stage 5 ROP</strong></p><p>The retina is completely detached, severely affecting vision.</p></li></ul></ul><h2>How often your baby's eyes will be checked</h2><p>Your baby's eyes need to be checked often. Sometimes they will be checked every week or even every few days. The frequency of exams depends on different factors, such as the severity and location of ROP in the eye and how quickly normal blood vessels are forming. The formation of blood vessels is called vascularization. After each exam, the doctor will let you know when the next exam will happen.</p><p>In the majority of cases, even when ROP develops, it will resolve on its own with minimal effect on your baby’s vision. However, it is very important to keep all the appointments because abnormal vessels can form fairly quickly. In approximately 10% of babies, ROP will progress to the extent that is no longer safe to wait for it to resolve on its own.</p><h2>Treating ROP</h2> <p>If your baby has ROP, the treatment will depend on your baby's eye condition. Your baby may need laser treatment, eye injections or even surgeries (operations) to repair retinal detachment. Your doctor will discuss the best treatment for your baby with you.</p><h2>Regular check-ups are important</h2><p>It is important that your child is seen by an ophthalmologist often. Even when the blood vessels are fully formed, there is a greater chance that a premature baby can have certain eye conditions in the future, such as: </p><ul><li>near-sightedness (myopia) </li><li>cross eyes (<a href="/Article?contentid=836&language=English">strabismus</a>) </li><li>lazy eye (<a href="/Article?contentid=835&language=English">amblyopia</a>) </li><li>a condition in which the rays of light are focused in each eye at a different point (anisometropia).</li></ul><p>The ophthalmologist will want to check your child's eyes for these conditions. If an eye problem is found, your child's doctor may be able to treat it early.</p>
Rétinopathie des prématurésRRétinopathie des prématurésRetinopathy of prematurity (ROP)FrenchOphthalmologyPrematureEyesNervous systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2012-11-15T05:00:00Z8.0000000000000063.00000000000001135.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez ce qu’est la rétinopathie des prématurés et comment elle peut être traitée.<br></p><p>Votre bébé prématuré doit subir un examen de la vue par un ophtalmologiste-pédiatre. Il s‘agit d’un médecin spécialiste des problèmes de rétine chez les enfants. Cet examen est important, car les bébés prématurés peuvent développer une maladie appelée rétinopathie des prématurés (autrement appelée fibroplasie rétrocristallinienne ou fribroplasie rétrolentale).</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>La formation de petits vaisseaux anormaux dans l’œil de votre bébé prématuré s’appelle rétinopathie des prématurés.</li> <li>Les vaisseaux peuvent entraîner des saignements et des cicatrices. Ils peuvent aussi faire que la rétine se déplace de son emplacement normal dans l’œil.</li> <li>Il est important de respecter les rendez-vous, car les vaisseaux anormaux peuvent se former rapidement.</li> <li>Les traitements dépendent de l’état des yeux de votre enfant. </li></ul><h2>Risques de rétinopathie des prématurés</h2><p>Personne ne sait réellement pourquoi des vaisseaux sanguins anormaux se forment. On pense qu’un traitement à l’oxygène – utilisé parfois pour aider les bébés prématurés à respirer – peut jouer un rôle, même si l’enfant est surveillé de près.</p><p>Les bébés prématurés n’ont pas tous une rétinopathie des prématurés. Les bébés qui sont nés avant la 30e semaine de gestation ou avec un poids inférieur à 1 500 g (environ 3 livres et 5 onces) sont plus à risque, mais cela dépend également de si la rétine s’est bien formée ou pas.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title">FRC avec décollement de la rétine </span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/ROP_retinal_detachment_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="L’anatomie d’un œil avec décollement de la rétine du haut et du bas de l’œil" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">La FRC peut provoquer la séparation de la rétine de son emplacement d'origine dans l'œil.</figcaption> </figure><h2>Pourquoi faire examiner votre bébé pour savoir s’il a une rétinopathie des prématurés</h2> <p>Les vaisseaux anormaux qui se forment peuvent entraîner des saignements et des cicatrices au niveau de la rétine. Ils peuvent également faire que la rétine se sépare de son emplacement normal dans l’œil. On appelle cela un décollement de rétine. Il peut s’en suivre une mauvaise vue ou même une cécité (être aveugle).</p> <p>Le médecin examinera les yeux de votre bébé pour déceler la présence de vaisseaux anormaux. Si ces vaisseaux sont traités à temps, cela peut aider à arrêter le décollement de rétine.</p> <h2>Pendant l’examen</h2> <p>Voici ce à quoi vous pouvez vous attendre pendant l’examen :</p> <ul><li>Nous mettrons des gouttes spéciales dans les yeux de votre bébé pour dilater (agrandir) ses pupilles. La pupille est la zone sombre au centre de la partie colorée de l’œil. Les gouttes mettent 30 minutes à une heure pour agir, parfois même plus.</li> <li>Ensuite, le médecin observera la rétine en utilisant un instrument avec une lumière vive appelée un ophtalmoscope.</li> <li>Puisque votre bébé ne pourra garder ses yeux ouverts, le médecin utilisera un instrument appelé spéculum pour garder les paupières ouvertes.</li> <li>Pour bien observer l’œil, le médecin utilisera également un instrument appelé un abaisse-langue pour déplacer doucement l’œil.</li></ul> <h3>Votre bébé ne devrait ressentir aucune douleur</h3> <p>L’examen n’est pas agréable, mais votre bébé ne devrait ressentir aucune douleur. Avant de commencer, nous mettrons des gouttes pour engourdir la surface du globe oculaire (de l’œil). Puisque votre bébé doit rester immobile pendant l’examen de ses yeux, nous l’envelopperons dans une couverture et le maintiendrons en place en douceur.</p> <p>Votre bébé pleurera comme la plupart des bébés. Après tout, ils n’apprécient pas d'être maintenus immobiles ou qu’on dirige une lumière vive dans leurs yeux. Cette lumière vive est nécessaire pour réaliser l’examen.</p> <h3>Que signifient étape et zone?</h3> <p>Après l’examen, le médecin vous expliquera l’état des yeux de votre bébé. Le médecin utilisera les termes stade et zone.</p> <ul><li>La zone est cotée de 1 à 3. Elle désigne jusqu’où les vaisseaux sanguins se sont développés sur la rétine. Zone 3 désigne le meilleur résultat alors que zone 1 est le pire. L’illustration vous montre les zones.</li> <li>Le stade indique la gravité de la maladie. Le stade 1 est le meilleur (le moins grave) et le 5 est le pire (le plus grave).</li></ul> <h2>Combien de fois examinera-t-on les yeux de votre bébé</h2> <p>Les yeux de votre bébé devront être examinés souvent. Parfois, ils seront examinés toutes les semaines ou même, plusieurs fois par semaine. Après chaque examen, le médecin vous indiquera quand aura lieu le prochain examen.</p> <p>Il est très important de respecter tous vos rendez-vous, car des vaisseaux anormaux peuvent se former assez rapidement.</p><h2>Traitement de la rétinopathie des prématurés</h2> <p>Si votre bébé a une rétinopathie des prématurés, l’ophtalmologiste utilisera divers traitements selon l’état des yeux de votre bébé. Il aura peut-être besoin d’un traitement au laser, d’un traitement par le froid, ou même dopérations chirurgicales pour corriger le décollement de rétine. Votre médecin discutera avec vous du traitement qui convient le mieux à votre bébé.</p> <p>Après le traitement, il est très important de continuer à faire examiner les yeux de votre bébé.</p><p>Il est important pour votre enfant qu’il consulte souvent un ophtalmologiste. Même si les vaisseaux sanguins sont entièrement formés, car un bébé prématuré aura plus de risques d’avoir des problèmes oculaires. Par exemple, un bébé prématuré peut avoir les problèmes suivants :</p><ul><li>myopie,</li><li>strabisme (loucher),</li><li>œil paresseux (amblyopie),</li><li>différence d’erreur de réfraction (anisométropie) – état où les rayons lumineux sont focalisés dans chaque œil à un point différent.</li></ul><p>L’ophtalmologiste voudra vérifier si les yeux de votre enfant ont un de ces problèmes. Si c’est le cas, le médecin pourra peut-être le traiter rapidement.</p>

 

 

 

 

Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP)834.000000000000Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP)Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP)REnglishOphthalmologyPrematureEyesNervous systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2021-09-10T04:00:00Z7.5000000000000064.70000000000001168.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn what retinopathy of prematurity is, how it is diagnosed and how it may be treated.</p><p>Your premature baby needs an eye exam by a paediatric ophthalmologist. This person is an eye doctor who specializes in checking and treating retina problems in children, including retina problems. This exam is important because premature babies may develop a condition called retinopathy (say: ret-in-OP-uh-thee) of prematurity, or ROP.<br></p><h2>What is the retina?</h2><p>The retina is the inside lining in the back of the eye. It is the part that absorbs the rays of light that enter the eye. The retina changes the rays into electrical signals. It then sends the signals to the brain as a picture. In this way, the retina is like a film in a camera: it turns the rays of light it receives into a picture that a person sees.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Eye cross section</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/ROP_normal_eye_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="The optic nerve, retina, retinal blood vessels, lens, iris, cornea, pupil and anterior chamber receiving image of balloons" /> </figure> <h2>What is retinopathy of prematurity?</h2><p>Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) happens in <a href="/Article?contentid=2499&language=English">premature babies</a> when abnormal blood vessels start developing at the back of the eye.<br></p><p>At about 16 weeks of pregnancy, the baby's retina begins to develop blood vessels. The blood vessels that feed the retina start at the back of the eye and grow toward the front. The retina is gradually and evenly covered in blood vessels. They finish forming just before the baby is born at full term.</p><p>In a premature baby, these blood vessels have not finished forming. They continue to form after the baby is born. Most of the time, they will form normally and there will be no problem. But if smaller, abnormal vessels start developing, the condition is called ROP.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP)</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/ROP_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="The anatomy of a premature eye with scar tissue and excessive growth of retinal blood vessels" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">If a baby is born very early, the blood vessels of the retina may not have grown enough or may grow abnormally. This is called retinopathy of prematurity (ROP).</figcaption> </figure><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Retinopathy of prematurity, or ROP, is caused when small abnormal blood vessels form in your premature baby's eye(s). </li> <li>The vessels can lead to bleeding and scarring. They may also cause the retina to move from its normal place in the eye. This is called retinal detachment.</li> <li>Your baby's eyes will be checked often for any changes. It is important to keep eye appointments, as abnormal vessels can form quickly. </li> <li>Treatments depend on your child's condition. </li> </ul><h2>What can happen if a baby has ROP </h2><p>Abnormal vessels can lead to bleeding and scarring in the retina. They may also cause the retina to separate, or move, from its normal place in the eye. This is called retinal detachment. This could lead to poor vision or even blindness.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">ROP with retinal detachment</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/ROP_retinal_detachment_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="The anatomy of an eye with retinal detachment along the top and bottom" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">ROP may cause the retina to separate from its normal place in the eye.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>How common is ROP?</h2><p>Nobody really knows why abnormal blood vessels form. Some premature babies need oxygen to help them breathe. It is thought this oxygen treatment may play a part in ROP, even when it is closely monitored.</p><p>Not all premature babies have ROP. Babies born before 28 weeks or who weigh less than 1000 g at birth are at the highest risk for developing severe ROP. The risk of ROP developing also depends on how well the retina has formed.</p><h2>Checking your baby for ROP</h2><p>In Canada, all premature babies with a birth weight of 1250 g or less, or who are born at or before 30 weeks and six days are routinely examined for ROP. They will likely be examined initially at four to six weeks after birth. </p><p>The doctor will check your baby's eyes for any abnormal vessels. If these vessels are treated in time, it may help to stop retinal detachment.</p><p>Here is what you can expect to happen during the exam.</p><ul><li>Your baby will have special eye drops to make the pupils bigger. The pupil is the dark area in the centre of the coloured part of the eye. The drops take 30 minutes to an hour to work, sometimes longer. </li><li>Since your baby needs to be very still when their eyes are checked, they will be wrapped in a blanket and held down gently.</li><li>The doctor will check the retina using an instrument with a bright light called an ophthalmoscope (say: op-THAL-mo-scope). </li><li>Your baby will have eye drops to numb the surface of the eyeball.</li><li>Once the eyeball is numb, the doctor will use an instrument called a speculum to hold your baby's eyelids apart. This is because your baby is too young to keep their eyes open.</li><li>To get a good look at the eye, the doctor will also use an instrument called a depressor to gently move the eyeball. </li></ul><h3>Your baby should not feel any pain</h3><p>Being held down and having a bright light shone in their eyes will make your baby uncomfortable. They may cry during the exam, but they should not feel any pain.</p><h2>Explaining the condition of your baby's eyes</h2><p>After the exam, the doctor will explain the condition of your baby's eyes. Your baby's condition will be graded depending on how much the abnormal blood vessels have grown. The doctor will use the terms "zone" and "stage".</p><ul><li>The zone is graded from 1 to 3. This explains how far the blood vessels have grown on the retina. Vessels go from Zone 1 to 3 as they grow. The second image on this page shows the zones. </li><li>The stage explains the severity of the ROP. It is graded from 1 to 5. Stage 1 is the best (least severe) and stage 5 is the worst (most severe). </li><ul><li><p><strong>Stage 1 ROP</strong></p><p>In Stage 1, there is a thin line between the area with blood vessels and the area where the blood vessels have not grown yet. At this stage, the vessels may grow normally on their own, but the condition must be watched.</p></li><li><p><strong>Stage 2 ROP</strong></p><p>In Stage 2, the line between the areas with and without blood vessels widens and thickens into a ridge. The condition may still resolve, or it may progress to Stage 3 ROP.</p></li><li><p><strong>Stage 3 ROP</strong></p><p>In Stage 3, new blood vessels begin to grow along the ridge and extend into the clear gel that fills the eye, called vitreous body. These blood vessels can bleed and form scar tissue. </p></li><li><p><strong>Stage 4A ROP</strong></p><p>In Stage 4A, the abnormal blood vessels and scar tissue pull on the retina, partially detaching it. The centre of vision, called fovea (say: FOH-vee-uh), is not involved.</p></li><li><p><strong>Stage 4B ROP</strong></p><p>The retina is still only partially detached, but the fovea is affected. This usually leaves both the centre and peripheral vision impaired to some degree.</p></li><li><p><strong>Stage 5 ROP</strong></p><p>The retina is completely detached, severely affecting vision.</p></li></ul></ul><h2>How often your baby's eyes will be checked</h2><p>Your baby's eyes need to be checked often. Sometimes they will be checked every week or even every few days. The frequency of exams depends on different factors, such as the severity and location of ROP in the eye and how quickly normal blood vessels are forming. The formation of blood vessels is called vascularization. After each exam, the doctor will let you know when the next exam will happen.</p><p>In the majority of cases, even when ROP develops, it will resolve on its own with minimal effect on your baby’s vision. However, it is very important to keep all the appointments because abnormal vessels can form fairly quickly. In approximately 10% of babies, ROP will progress to the extent that is no longer safe to wait for it to resolve on its own.</p><h2>Treating ROP</h2> <p>If your baby has ROP, the treatment will depend on your baby's eye condition. Your baby may need laser treatment, eye injections or even surgeries (operations) to repair retinal detachment. Your doctor will discuss the best treatment for your baby with you.</p><h2>Regular check-ups are important</h2><p>It is important that your child is seen by an ophthalmologist often. Even when the blood vessels are fully formed, there is a greater chance that a premature baby can have certain eye conditions in the future, such as: </p><ul><li>near-sightedness (myopia) </li><li>cross eyes (<a href="/Article?contentid=836&language=English">strabismus</a>) </li><li>lazy eye (<a href="/Article?contentid=835&language=English">amblyopia</a>) </li><li>a condition in which the rays of light are focused in each eye at a different point (anisometropia).</li></ul><p>The ophthalmologist will want to check your child's eyes for these conditions. If an eye problem is found, your child's doctor may be able to treat it early.</p><h2>Caring for your child's eyes in the future</h2> <p>All premature babies need regular eye exams by an ophthalmologist, preferably a paediatric ophthalmologist. An optometrist is <strong>not</strong> the right kind of doctor for premature babies. </p> <h3>If your baby's retinal blood vessels are normal</h3> <p>Your baby will still need to see an ophthalmologist regularly, but they will no longer need a retina specialist. The doctor may refer your child to a paediatric ophthalmologist in your area for check-ups. </p> <h3>If your baby has been treated for ROP<br></h3> <p>Your baby will continue to see a paediatric ophthalmologist who also specializes in retinal problems. </p> <p>When your baby's retinal condition is stable, your doctor may refer them to a paediatric ophthalmologist in your area for continued check-ups. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/ROP_MED_ILL_EN.jpgRetinopathy of prematurity (ROP)False

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