Chiari malformationCChiari malformationChiari malformationEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainBrainConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-06T05:00:00ZMary Douglas, RN, KRN, BScN, MN;James Drake, BSE, MB, BCh, MSc, FRCSC;Patricia Rowe, RN, BScN, MN, NP Peds;Sheila Rowed, RN, BScN;Shobhan Vachhrajani, MD7.0000000000000072.00000000000001290.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>A Chiari malformation is when the lower part of the brain sits too low in your child's neck. Read about symptoms, causes, diagnosis and surgical treatment.</p><h2>What is a Chiari malformation?</h2><p>A Chiari (say: key-AR-ee) malformation is when the lower part of the brain sits too low in your child's upper spine (neck) area.</p><p>There are several types of Chiari malformation. Type 1 and type 2 are the most common:</p><ul><li>Type 1 is when a part of the brain called the cerebellar tonsil sits too low in the upper spine area. Children with type 1 Chiari malformation rarely have any symptoms, but they may have headache, neck pain or signs of a syrinx and/or scoliosis (curvature of the spine). This page mainly discusses type 1 Chiari malformation.</li><li>Type 2 is when the lower part of the brain (the brainstem) sits too low.</li></ul> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Chiari malformation</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Chiari_Malformation_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A Chiari malformation is when the brainstem sits too low in your child’s head or in the upper spine (neck) area. The brainstem can become compressed or squished, which means that it does not work properly.</figcaption> </figure> <p>The brainstem controls important body functions such as breathing, heartbeat, and swallowing. When it is lower than usual, the brainstem can be compressed or squished with the upper part of the spinal cord. This means that your child may have problems such as the following:</p><ul><li>trouble breathing</li><li>slow heart rate</li><li>choking, gagging or other trouble swallowing</li></ul><p>A Chiari malformation can also block the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) from traveling in and around the brain and spinal cord. CSF is an important fluid that provides food for the brain and spinal cord. CSF also acts like a shock absorber to protect the brain and spinal cord from injury.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>A type 2 Chiari malformation is when the branistem sits too low in your child's head. This can cause problems with breathing, swallowing, and other important body functions. </li> <li>A Chiari malformation may be corrected with an operation. Your child will need to stay in hospital for five to seven days. </li> <li>After your child goes home, you need to watch for signs of infection or signs that the operation did not work. </li> </ul><h2>Chiari malformation causes different symptoms</h2> <p>Some of the symptoms your child may have include the following:</p> <ul> <li>Headache. </li> <li>Increased sensitivity to things in his mouth. For example, your child may gag when he brushes his teeth.</li> <li>Gagging or choking on food or drinks. If this is severe, food or liquid may enter the lungs. This is called aspiration. </li> <li>In babies, a weak suck when feeding. </li> <li>Change in your child's voice or cry. Babies may have a weak cry. Some children may have stridor, which is a high-pitched "croupy" sound, when they cry. </li> <li>Weakness in the arms or hands. </li> <li>Pain, tingling or other abnormal feelings in the neck, arms or hands </li> <li>Snoring, trouble breathing or changes in breathing pattern. If this is severe, your child may stop breathing for more than 15 seconds. This is called apnea. </li> <li>Tendency to arch head back. </li> </ul><h2>What causes a Chiari malformation is not known</h2> <p>Type 2 Chiari malformations are found in many children with spina bifida. But having a Chiari malformation does not always mean your child has spina bifida. </p><h2>Chiari malformation is diagnosed with an MRI scan</h2> <p>Your doctor will arrange for a test called an MRI scan. An MRI scanner is a machine that can take special pictures of your child's brain. It will show where your child's brainstem is sitting and if it is compressed or squished. This test will tell the doctor if your child has a Chiari malformation. An MRI of your child's spine may also be done to look for evidence of a syrinx. </p> <p>MRI requires your child to stay still while the pictures are being taken. Some children need sedation medicine to help them keep still during the tests. </p><h2>Your child may need an operation</h2> <p>Your child may need surgery (an operation) to repair a Chiari malformation. The surgery involves giving the brainstem more room so it is no longer compressed. </p> <p>The surgery is referred to as a "Chiari decompression" or a "posterior fossa decompression." The area at the bottom of the brain and top of the spinal cord is also called the posterior fossa area. </p> <h3>What happens during the operation</h3> <p>Your child will be given a special "sleep medicine" called a general anesthetic to make sure he sleeps through the operation and does not feel any pain. </p> <p>The surgeon will cut in a vertical (up and down) line at the back of your child's neck. The cut will start at the bottom part of the skull and extend down to the top part of the neck. Then the surgeon will remove small pieces of bone from the bottom of your child's skull and the top of the spine to give the spinal cord more room. </p> <p>The surgery is usually about three or four hours long, but it may take longer.</p> <h2>Your child will stay in hospital for about five to seven days after the surgery</h2> <p>Depending on how your child is doing, they may spend the first night after surgery in the intensive care unit, or they may be cared for in the close observation room on the neuroscience unit. Your child will probably need to stay in hospital for about five to seven days in total. </p> <h3>Your child will have medicine to help with pain</h3> <p>Your child may feel pain at the operative site. Usually, your child will have <a href="/Article?contentid=194&language=English">morphine</a> through their intravenous line (IV) for one or two days. This should control the pain. If it does not control the pain, speak to your child's nurse. </p> <p>After one or two days, the morphine drip will be slowed down and your child will take pain medicine by mouth.</p> <p>Your child may also learn other ways to control pain, such as blowing bubbles or relaxation breathing. Ask your nurse or the Child Life specialist to help you and your child learn how to do this. </p> <h3>Your child may have monitors attached</h3> <p>Your child may need to have monitors attached. Monitors are machines that help the nurses keep track of the following:</p> <ul> <li>your child's breathing </li> <li>your child's heart rate </li> <li>if your child is getting enough oxygen </li> </ul> <h3>Your child will probably be sore after the surgery</h3> <p>The back of the neck has a lot of muscles, so after the surgery, your child may have a sore neck. He may find it hard to move his head. </p> <p>A physiotherapist may be involved in your child's care. The physiotherapist will give your child exercises to help the neck muscles recover after surgery.</p>
Malformation de ChiariMMalformation de ChiariChiari malformationFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainBrainConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-06T05:00:00ZMary Douglas, RN, KRN, BScN, MN;James Drake, BSE, MB, BCh, MSc, FRCSC;Patricia Rowe, RN, BScN, MN, NP Peds;Sheila Rowed, RN, BScN;Shobhan Vachhrajani, MD7.0000000000000072.00000000000001290.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Une malformation de Chiari se produit lorsque la partie inférieure du cerveau est située trop bas sur le cou de votre enfant. Apprenez-en davantage sur les symptômes, les causes, le diagnostic et le traitement chirurgical.</p><h2>Qu’est-ce qu’une malformation de Chiari?</h2> <p>Une malformation de Chiari (prononcer : qui-a-ri) se produit lorsque la partie inférieure du cerveau est située trop bas sur le haut de la colonne vertébrale ( cou) de votre enfant.</p> <p>Il existe divers types de malformations de Chiari . Les type 1 et 2 sont les plus courants :</p> <ul> <li>Le type 1 se produit lorsqu’une partie du cerveau appelée amygdale cérébelleuse se situe trop bas sur le haut de la colonne vertébrale. Les enfants qui ont une malformation de Chiari de type 1 ne présentent aucun symptôme, mais ils ont des maux de tête, des douleurs au cou ou des signes de syrinx ou de scoliose (courbure de la colonne vertébrale). Cette page traite principalement de la malformation de Chiari de type 1.</li> <li>Le type 2 se produit lorsque la partie inférieure du cerveau (tronc cérébral) se situe trop bas.</li> </ul> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Malformation de Chiari</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Chiari_Malformation_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Une malformation de Chiari se produit lorsque le tronc cérébral est situé trop bas dans le crâne de votre enfant ou dans la partie supérieure de la colonne (cou). Il se peut que le tronc cérébral soit comprimé ou écrasé, et qu'il ne fonctionne donc pas adéquatement.</figcaption> </figure> <p>Le tronc cérébral contrôle d’importantes fonctions corporelles comme la respiration, les battements de cœur et la déglutition (action d’avaler). Lorsqu’il est plus bas que la normale, le tronc cérébral peut être comprimé ou écrasé sur la partie supérieure de la moelle épinière. Cela signifie que votre enfant peut avoir les problèmes suivants : </p> <ul> <li>de la difficulté à respirer,</li> <li>un rythme cardiaque lent,</li> <li>de la suffocation, des hauts-le-cœur ou d’autres problèmes à avaler. </li> </ul> <p>Une malformation de Chiari peut également bloquer la circulation du liquide céphalo-rachidien (LCR) dans et autour du cerveau et de la moelle épinière. Le LCR est un liquide important qui nourrit le cerveau et la moelle épinière. Il agit aussi comme un tampon pour absorber les chocs et protéger le cerveau et la moelle épinière des blessures. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Une malformation de Chiari de type 2 se produit lorsque le tronc cérébral est situé trop bas dans la tête de votre enfant. Cela peut entraîner des problèmes de respiration, de déglutition (avaler) ou d’autres fonctions corporelles importantes.</li> <li>Une opération permet de corriger une malformation de Chiari. Votre enfant devra rester à l’hôpital 5 à 7 jours.</li> <li>Une fois que votre enfant sera rentré à la maison, vous devrez observer s’il montre des signes d’infection ou des signes qui indiquent que l’opération n’a pas fonctionné. </li> </ul><h2>La malformation de Chiari cause divers symptômes</h2> <p>Certains des symptômes de votre enfant peuvent comprendre ceux qui suivent :</p> <ul> <li>Des maux de tête;</li> <li>Une sensibilité accrue à la présence d’objets dans la bouche. Par exemple, votre enfant peut avoir des hauts-le-cœur lorsqu’il se brosse les dents;</li> <li>Des hauts-le-cœur ou des étouffements en mangeant ou en buvant. Dans les cas graves, la nourriture ou le liquide peut pénétrer dans les poumons. On appelle ce phénomène l’aspiration;</li> <li>Chez les bébés, une succion faible lors de la tétée;</li> <li>Des changements dans la voix ou les pleurs de votre enfant. Les bébés peuvent avoir un cri faible. Certains enfants peuvent émettre un stridor, c'est-à-dire un son très aigu, lorsqu’ils pleurent;</li> <li>Des faiblesses dans les bras ou les mains;</li> <li>De la douleur, des fourmillements ou d’autres sensations anormales dans le cou, les bras ou les mains;</li> <li>Des ronflements, de la difficulté à respirer ou des changements du rythme de la respiration. Dans les cas graves, votre enfant peut arrêter de respirer pendant plus de 15 seconds. On appelle cela de l’apnée;</li> <li>Une tendance à arquer sa tête vers l’arrière. </li> </ul><h2>La cause de la malformation de Chiari est inconnue</h2> <p>De nombreux enfants avec une spina-bifida ont souvent une malformation de Chiari de type 2. Mais l’inverse n’est pas forcément vrai : ce n’est pas parce que votre enfant a une malformation de Chiari qu’il a une spina-bifida.</p><h2>Le diagnostic d’une malformation de Chiari se fait grâce à une IRM</h2> <p>Votre médecin prévoira un examen d'imagerie par résonnance magnétique (IRM). Un appareil d’IRM permet de prendre des photos du cerveau de votre enfant. Ces photos montreront où se situe son tronc cérébral et s’il est comprimé ou écrasé. Cet examen indiquera au médecin si votre enfant a une malformation de Chiari. Il demandera peut-être aussi une IRM de la colonne vertébrale de votre enfant pour déterminer s’il y a présence d’un syrinx.</p> <p>Pendant un examen par IRM, votre enfant doit demeurer immobile pendant que les photos sont prises. Pour certains enfants, il faut leur administrer un sédatif pour les aider à rester immobiles pendant l’examen. </p><h2>Votre enfant devra peut-être subir une opération</h2> <p>Votre enfant devra peut-être subir une opération chirurgicale pour corriger une malformation de Chiari. La chirurgie vise à donner plus d’espace au tronc cérébral pour qu’il ne soit plus comprimé.</p> <p>Cette chirurgie s’appelle une « décompression de Chiari » ou une « décompression de la fosse cérébrale postérieure ». La région au bas du cerveau et en haut de la moelle épinière s’appelle également la fosse cérébrale postérieure.</p> <h3>Que se passe-t-il pendant l’opération</h3> <p>Votre enfant recevra une anesthésie générale (médicament pour dormir) pour s’assurer qu’il dorme pendant toute l’opération et qu’il ne ressente aucune douleur.</p> <p>Le chirurgien pratiquera une incision verticale (de haut en bas) à l’arrière du cou de votre enfant. L’incision partira du bas du crâne et descendra jusqu’en haut du cou. Le chirurgien retirera ensuite de petits morceaux d’os à la base du crâne de votre enfant et en haut de la colonne verticale pour donner plus d’espace à la moelle épinière. </p> <p>Cette opération dure habituellement de 3 à 4 heures, mais elle peut durer plus longtemps.</p> <h2>Votre enfant restera à l’hôpital de 5 à 7 jours après l'opération</h2> <p>Selon l’état de votre enfant, il pourra devoir passer la première nuit après la chirurgie à l’unité de soins intensifs ou dans la salle de surveillance étroite de l’unité de neuroscience. Votre enfant devra probablement rester à l’hôpital de 5 à 7 jours.</p> <h3>Votre enfant recevra des médicaments pour soulager sa douleur</h3> <p>Votre enfant pourrait ressentir de la douleur dans la région qui aura été opérée. Habituellement, il recevra de la morphine par intraveineuse (IV) pendant 1 ou 2 jours. Cela devrait permettre de contrôler la douleur. Sinon, parlez-en à l’infirmier de votre enfant.</p> <p>Après 1 ou 2 jours, la vitesse du goutte-à-goutte de morphine sera réduite et votre enfant prendra des analgésiques (médicaments contre la douleur) par voie orale (la bouche).</p> <p>Votre enfant trouvera peut-être aussi d’autres façons de contrôler sa douleur, par exemple en se changeant les idées en faisant des bulles de savon ou encore, en pratiquant la respiration relaxante. Demandez à l’infirmier ou à l'éducateur en milieu pédiatrique de vous aider et d’aider votre enfant à apprendre comment faire. </p> <h3>Votre enfant sera peut-être branché à des moniteurs</h3> <p>Votre enfant sera peut-être branché à des moniteurs, c’est-à-dire des appareils qui aident les infirmiers à surveiller :</p> <ul> <li>sa respiration,</li> <li>son rythme cardiaque,</li> <li>sa consommation d’oxygène. </li> </ul> <h3>Votre enfant ressentira probablement de la douleur après la chirurgie</h3> <p>Il y a de nombreux muscles à l’arrière du cou. C’est pourquoi, après l'opération, le cou de votre enfant sera peut-être douloureux. Il trouvera peut-être difficile de bouger la tête.</p> <p>Un physiothérapeute pourra participer aux soins de votre enfant. Le physiothérapeute lui donnera des exercices à faire pour aider les muscles du cou à se rétablir après la chirurgie.</p>

 

 

Chiari malformation853.000000000000Chiari malformationChiari malformationCEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainBrainConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-06T05:00:00ZMary Douglas, RN, KRN, BScN, MN;James Drake, BSE, MB, BCh, MSc, FRCSC;Patricia Rowe, RN, BScN, MN, NP Peds;Sheila Rowed, RN, BScN;Shobhan Vachhrajani, MD7.0000000000000072.00000000000001290.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>A Chiari malformation is when the lower part of the brain sits too low in your child's neck. Read about symptoms, causes, diagnosis and surgical treatment.</p><h2>What is a Chiari malformation?</h2><p>A Chiari (say: key-AR-ee) malformation is when the lower part of the brain sits too low in your child's upper spine (neck) area.</p><p>There are several types of Chiari malformation. Type 1 and type 2 are the most common:</p><ul><li>Type 1 is when a part of the brain called the cerebellar tonsil sits too low in the upper spine area. Children with type 1 Chiari malformation rarely have any symptoms, but they may have headache, neck pain or signs of a syrinx and/or scoliosis (curvature of the spine). This page mainly discusses type 1 Chiari malformation.</li><li>Type 2 is when the lower part of the brain (the brainstem) sits too low.</li></ul> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Chiari malformation</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Chiari_Malformation_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A Chiari malformation is when the brainstem sits too low in your child’s head or in the upper spine (neck) area. The brainstem can become compressed or squished, which means that it does not work properly.</figcaption> </figure> <p>The brainstem controls important body functions such as breathing, heartbeat, and swallowing. When it is lower than usual, the brainstem can be compressed or squished with the upper part of the spinal cord. This means that your child may have problems such as the following:</p><ul><li>trouble breathing</li><li>slow heart rate</li><li>choking, gagging or other trouble swallowing</li></ul><p>A Chiari malformation can also block the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) from traveling in and around the brain and spinal cord. CSF is an important fluid that provides food for the brain and spinal cord. CSF also acts like a shock absorber to protect the brain and spinal cord from injury.</p><h2>What is a syrinx?</h2> <p>Sometimes, when the flow of CSF into the spine is blocked, a syrinx is formed. A syrinx (say: SEAR-inks) is a small cyst or pocket of fluid that forms when some CSF becomes trapped inside the spinal cord. Often, fixing the Chiari malformation can help fix the syrinx. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>A type 2 Chiari malformation is when the branistem sits too low in your child's head. This can cause problems with breathing, swallowing, and other important body functions. </li> <li>A Chiari malformation may be corrected with an operation. Your child will need to stay in hospital for five to seven days. </li> <li>After your child goes home, you need to watch for signs of infection or signs that the operation did not work. </li> </ul><h2>Chiari malformation causes different symptoms</h2> <p>Some of the symptoms your child may have include the following:</p> <ul> <li>Headache. </li> <li>Increased sensitivity to things in his mouth. For example, your child may gag when he brushes his teeth.</li> <li>Gagging or choking on food or drinks. If this is severe, food or liquid may enter the lungs. This is called aspiration. </li> <li>In babies, a weak suck when feeding. </li> <li>Change in your child's voice or cry. Babies may have a weak cry. Some children may have stridor, which is a high-pitched "croupy" sound, when they cry. </li> <li>Weakness in the arms or hands. </li> <li>Pain, tingling or other abnormal feelings in the neck, arms or hands </li> <li>Snoring, trouble breathing or changes in breathing pattern. If this is severe, your child may stop breathing for more than 15 seconds. This is called apnea. </li> <li>Tendency to arch head back. </li> </ul><h2>What causes a Chiari malformation is not known</h2> <p>Type 2 Chiari malformations are found in many children with spina bifida. But having a Chiari malformation does not always mean your child has spina bifida. </p><h2>Chiari malformation is diagnosed with an MRI scan</h2> <p>Your doctor will arrange for a test called an MRI scan. An MRI scanner is a machine that can take special pictures of your child's brain. It will show where your child's brainstem is sitting and if it is compressed or squished. This test will tell the doctor if your child has a Chiari malformation. An MRI of your child's spine may also be done to look for evidence of a syrinx. </p> <p>MRI requires your child to stay still while the pictures are being taken. Some children need sedation medicine to help them keep still during the tests. </p><h2>Your child may need an operation</h2> <p>Your child may need surgery (an operation) to repair a Chiari malformation. The surgery involves giving the brainstem more room so it is no longer compressed. </p> <p>The surgery is referred to as a "Chiari decompression" or a "posterior fossa decompression." The area at the bottom of the brain and top of the spinal cord is also called the posterior fossa area. </p> <h3>What happens during the operation</h3> <p>Your child will be given a special "sleep medicine" called a general anesthetic to make sure he sleeps through the operation and does not feel any pain. </p> <p>The surgeon will cut in a vertical (up and down) line at the back of your child's neck. The cut will start at the bottom part of the skull and extend down to the top part of the neck. Then the surgeon will remove small pieces of bone from the bottom of your child's skull and the top of the spine to give the spinal cord more room. </p> <p>The surgery is usually about three or four hours long, but it may take longer.</p> <h2>Your child will stay in hospital for about five to seven days after the surgery</h2> <p>Depending on how your child is doing, they may spend the first night after surgery in the intensive care unit, or they may be cared for in the close observation room on the neuroscience unit. Your child will probably need to stay in hospital for about five to seven days in total. </p> <h3>Your child will have medicine to help with pain</h3> <p>Your child may feel pain at the operative site. Usually, your child will have <a href="/Article?contentid=194&language=English">morphine</a> through their intravenous line (IV) for one or two days. This should control the pain. If it does not control the pain, speak to your child's nurse. </p> <p>After one or two days, the morphine drip will be slowed down and your child will take pain medicine by mouth.</p> <p>Your child may also learn other ways to control pain, such as blowing bubbles or relaxation breathing. Ask your nurse or the Child Life specialist to help you and your child learn how to do this. </p> <h3>Your child may have monitors attached</h3> <p>Your child may need to have monitors attached. Monitors are machines that help the nurses keep track of the following:</p> <ul> <li>your child's breathing </li> <li>your child's heart rate </li> <li>if your child is getting enough oxygen </li> </ul> <h3>Your child will probably be sore after the surgery</h3> <p>The back of the neck has a lot of muscles, so after the surgery, your child may have a sore neck. He may find it hard to move his head. </p> <p>A physiotherapist may be involved in your child's care. The physiotherapist will give your child exercises to help the neck muscles recover after surgery.</p><h2>Going home</h2> <p>Before you take your child home, the surgeon or the nurse will explain how to take care of your child at home. The instructions will include the following: </p> <ul> <li>how to take care of your child's incision (cut) </li> <li>what to do with your child's stitches or staples </li> <li>how to tell if your child's incision becomes infected </li> <li>other things to watch for </li> </ul> <h3>Taking care of your child's incision</h3> <p>Watch your child's incision (cut) to make sure it is healing well. It is all right if the incision gets wet in the bath or shower. Your surgeon and a nurse will discuss with you how long to wait before your child can have a bath or shower. </p> <h3>Taking care of your child's stitches</h3> <p>How your child's staples or stitches are taken out depends on the type of staple or stitch that was used. Your surgeon or nurse will tell you what type of stitches were used. </p> <ul> <li>If your child has staples or stitches that need to be taken out, your family doctor will need to do this. The stitches should be taken out about seven to 10 days after the operation. Staples should be removed about 10 days after the operation. Your surgeon or nurse will tell you when they need to come out. </li> <li>If staples were used, you will be given a special remover to take to your family doctor. </li> <li>If your child has the kind of stitches that dissolve on their own, you can see your family doctor to have the incision line checked, but the stitches will not need to be taken out. </li> </ul> <h3>How to tell if your child's incision is infected</h3> <p>Tell your surgeon if you notice any of the following signs of infection:</p> <ul> <li>fluid leaking out of the incision </li> <li>fever </li> <li>redness </li> <li>swelling </li> <li>smelly discharge </li> <li>neck stiffness </li> </ul> <h3>Other symptoms to watch for</h3> <p>In some cases, the decompression surgery may not work. Watch your child for returning symptoms or new symptoms of Chiari malformation, even after your child goes home. These include: </p> <ul> <li>headache </li> <li>bogginess or fluid collection at the incision site </li> <li>vomiting </li> <li>irritability </li> <li>increased sensitivity to things in the mouth, such as gagging when brushing teeth</li> <li>gagging or choking on food or drinks </li> <li>in babies, a weak suck when feeding </li> <li>change in your child's voice or cry </li> <li>weakness in the arms or hands </li> <li>pain, tingling or other abnormal feelings in the neck, arms or hands </li> <li>snoring, trouble breathing or changes in breathing pattern </li> <li>tendency to arch head back </li> </ul> <p>If you notice any of these symptoms, contact your child's surgeon right away.</p><h2>Following up after the operation</h2> <p>The surgeon will see your child in a follow-up clinic visit about six weeks after your child goes home. The appointment may be made for you when your child is discharged. If not, call the neurosurgery clinic to make an appointment. </p> <p>Write down the date and time here:</p> <p> </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Chiari_Malformation_MED_ILL_EN.jpgChiari malformation

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