Tethered cordTTethered cordTethered cordEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BackSpinal CordConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZMary Douglas, RN, KRN, BScN, MN, TNCC;James Drake, BSE, MB, BCh, MSc, FRCSC;Patricia Rowe, RN, BScN, MN, NP Peds;Sheila Rowed, RN, BScN, CNN(C);Shobhan Vachhrajani, MD6.0000000000000079.00000000000001699.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Tethered cord occurs when the spinal cord gets stuck to the bottom of the spinal column and is stretched. Learn about how tethered cord is treated. </p><h2>What is a tethered cord?</h2><p>The "cord" in "tethered cord" is the spinal cord. The spinal cord is the bundle of nerves that carries messages between the brain and the body.</p><p>Before a baby is born, the spinal cord is normally the same length as the bones that surround it. These bones are called the spinal column. As the baby grows, the spinal column gets longer than the spinal cord. This means the spinal cord has to be able to move freely inside the spinal column. But in some babies, the bottom end (tail) of the spinal cord is "tethered" or tied down to the bottom end of the spinal column. This is called tethered cord.</p><p>Tethered cord means the spinal cord cannot move inside the spinal column. As the child grows taller, the spinal cord is stretched. If the nerves are stretched, they may not work properly, and this can cause problems for your child. Your child may need an operation to help the spinal cord move freely.</p><p>The information on this page will help you explain tethered cord to your child, using words your child can understand.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Tethered cord</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Tethered_cord_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Tethered cord means the spinal cord cannot move freely inside the spinal column. Two of the most common causes of tethered cord are shown above: Lipomeningocele (fatty growth) and scar tissue following back surgery.</figcaption> </figure><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Tethered cord means that your child's spinal cord cannot move freely inside their spinal column. The spinal cord is stretched. </li> <li>Tethered cord can cause problems with bladder control, bowel control or walking. </li> <li>Tethered cord may be treated with surgery (an operation) to release the stretching of the spinal cord. </li> <li>Your child will probably stay in hospital for about one week. </li> <li>Call your child's surgeon if you notice any fluid leaking out of your child's surgical cut; if you see bulging, redness, swelling or smelly discharge from the cut; or if your child has a fever. </li> </ul><h2>Tethered cord can cause lack of bladder and bowel control or problems walking</h2> <p>The most common signs of a tethered cord are the following:</p> <ul> <li>Lack of bladder control: When nerves in your child's spinal cord are stretched, your child may not be able to feel when they need to pee. They may wet their pants. </li> <li>Lack of bowel control: The nerves that control the bowel may also be stretched. Your child may not be able to control their bowel movements. </li> <li>Back pain </li> <li>Curving of the spine </li> <li>Trouble walking as well as before </li> </ul><h2>What causes a tethered cord?</h2> <p>The cause of a tethered cord is not always known. We do know that:</p> <ul> <li>It is sometimes found with spina bifida. </li> <li>It is present from birth in some children. </li> </ul> <p>Tethered cord happens when something catches hold of the spinal cord and does not let it move freely. Usually, one of these things catches the cord: </p> <ul> <li>A tight ligament: There is a ligament, like a string, in your child's back called the filum terminale (say: FILL-um term-in-ALL-ay). Normally it is stretchy, but sometimes it is tight and tethers the cord. </li> <li>A scar: If your child has had back surgery, a scar can form around the bottom end of the cord. This can "catch" the spinal cord. </li> <li>Bone: Sometimes, a piece of bone can catch a part of the spinal cord. </li> <li>Fat: Sometimes, fat grows in and around the spinal cord and catches hold of it. </li> </ul><h2>Your child will need tests</h2> <p>Usually, parents notice one or more signs and bring their child to the doctor. If the doctor thinks your child has a tethered cord, they will do some tests. </p> <h3>MRI</h3> <p>In this test, a magnet and radio waves are used to take pictures of the inside of your child's body. The test does not hurt. Sometimes your child will need to take medicine through a needle for one of the following reasons: </p> <ul> <li>to help your child to stay still during the test </li> <li>to help the doctor to see the inside of the back more clearly </li> </ul> <p>MRI requires your child to stay still while the pictures are being taken. Some children need sedation medicine to help them keep still during the tests. </p> <h3>Urology consultation</h3> <p>If your child is having problems with peeing, the doctor may send you to see another doctor called a urologist. This doctor will do tests on your child's bladder. </p><h2>Tethered cord may be treated with surgery</h2> <p>When the stretching of the spinal cord causes problems, your child may need surgery (an operation). This operation involves opening the back and the spinal column in order to release the spinal cord so it can move freely. The operation is called a laminectomy. If the operation is not done, the stretching may get worse. The problems caused by the stretching may also get worse. </p> <p>If your child's spinal cord has already been damaged, surgery may not fix the damage.</p> <h3>What happens during the operation</h3> <p>Your child will have a special "sleep medicine" called a general anesthetic. This will make your child'sleep through the operation. An incision (cut) is made on your child's back. </p> <p>The surgeon will cut a piece of bone from the spinal column where the cord is tethered. Then the surgeon will cut and release what is holding the cord to the spinal column. This will let the spinal cord move freely. </p> <p>The operation takes about three hours.</p> <h2>After the operation</h2> <p>After the operation, your child will spend about two to four hours in the Post Anaesthetic Care Unit (PACU). Then your child will go back to the Neurosurgical Unit. </p> <p>Your child will have a bandage on their back. The nurse will check the bandage often. The nurse will also check your child's temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, breathing and leg movements. </p> <p>Your child will have a thin tube in their arm. This is called an intravenous (IV) tube. It allows fluids and medicines to be given directly into your child's bloodstream. </p> <h3>Your child needs to lie flat for two to three days</h3> <p>For the first two to three days after the operation, your child needs to lie flat in bed. This is to prevent leakage of fluid from around the spinal cord. Do not let your child sit up until the surgeon says this is OK. </p> <p>The nurse will turn your child from side to side about every two to four hours. This will help prevent sores that may develop from lying in bed. It will also help prevent any chest problems after surgery. </p> <h3>Your child will have medicine for pain</h3> <p>Your child may feel pain at the operative site. Usually, your child will have <a href="/Article?contentid=194&language=English">morphine</a> through their intravenous line (IV) for one or two days. This should control the pain. If it does not control the pain, speak to your child's nurse. </p> <p>After one or two days, the morphine drip will be slowed down and your child will take pain medicine by mouth.</p> <p>Your child may also learn other ways to control pain, such as blowing bubbles or relaxation breathing. Ask your nurse or the Child Life specialist to help you and your child learn how to do this. </p> <h3>Your child will probably stay in hospital for about one week</h3> <p>Each child gets better at a different rate. Most children stay in hospital for about one week. After your child gets better from the operation, your child's surgeon will decide when they can go home. </p><h2>After your child goes home</h2> <p>Tell your child's surgeon if you notice any of the following things. These mean that your child's cut could be infected:</p> <ul> <li>fluid leaking out of the surgical cut </li> <li>fluid collection (bulging) at the cut </li> <li>redness </li> <li>swelling </li> <li>smelly discharge from the cut </li> <li>fever </li> </ul> <p>Also watch your child for the following:</p> <ul> <li>changes in bladder or bowel function </li> <li>back pain </li> <li>trouble walking </li> <li>changes in movement of the arms and legs </li> <li>irritability (crankiness) </li> </ul> <p>If you have any concerns, contact your child's surgeon.</p>
Syndrome de la moelle attachéeSSyndrome de la moelle attachéeTethered cordFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BackSpinal CordConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZMary Douglas, RN, KRN, BScN, MN, TNCC;James Drake, BSE, MB, BCh, MSc, FRCSC;Patricia Rowe, RN, BScN, MN, NP Peds;Sheila Rowed, RN, BScN, CNN(C);Shobhan Vachhrajani, MD6.0000000000000079.00000000000001699.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Le syndrome du filum terminal se produit lorsque la moelle épinière reste attachée au bas de la colonne vertébrale et se retrouve étirée. Apprenez-en davantage sur le traitement du syndrome du filum terminal.<br></p><h2>Qu’est-ce qu’une moelle attachée?</h2> <p>Le terme «moelle » dans « moelle attachée » désigne la moelle épinière, l’ensemble de nerfs qui transportent les messages entre le cerveau et le corps. </p> <p>Avant la naissance d’un bébé, la moelle épinière est habituellement la même longueur que les os qui l’entoure. On appelle ces os la colonne vertébrale. À mesure que le bébé grandit, la colonne vertébrale devient plus longue que la moelle épinière; cela signifie que la moelle épinière doit être en mesure de bouger aisément dans la colonne vertébrale. Mais chez certains bébés, l’extrémité inférieure (la queue) de la moelle épinière est attachée au bas de la colonne vertébrale. C’est ce que l’on appelle le syndrome de la moelle attachée.</p> <p>Si la moelle est attachée, elle ne peut pas bouger dans la colonne vertébrale. À mesure que l’enfant grandit, la moelle épinière est étirée. Si les nerfs sont sous tension, ils pourraient ne pas fonctionner correctement, ce qui peut causer des problèmes à l’enfant. Votre enfant pourrait avoir besoin d’une opération pour que la colonne se déplace librement.</p> <p>Les renseignements sur cette page vous aideront à expliquer le syndrome de la moelle attachée à votre enfant en vous servant de mots qu’il peut comprendre.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Filum terminale</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Tethered_cord_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">La filum terminale signifie que la moelle épinière ne peut bouger librement à l'intérieur de la colonne vertébrale. Deux des causes les plus courantes de cette affection sont illustrées ci-dessus : la lipoméningocèle (excroissance graisseuse) et les tissus cicatriciels à la suite d'une chirurgie dorsale.</figcaption> </figure><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Le syndrome de la moelle attachée signifie que la moelle épinière de votre enfant ne peut se déplacer librement dans la colonne vertébrale, et que la moelle est étirée.</li><li>La moelle étirée peut causer des problèmes de contrôle vésical ou intestinal ou des difficultés à marcher.</li><li>La moelle attachée peut se traiter au moyen d’une opération, qui consiste à relâcher l’étirement de la moelle épinière.</li><li>Votre enfant demeurera probablement à l’hôpital pendant environ une semaine.</li><li>Appelez le chirurgien de votre enfant si vous remarquez du liquide qui s’écoule de l’incision de votre enfant, si vous voyez un gonflement, des rougeurs, de l’enflure ou des écoulements nauséabonds en provenance de l’incision, ou si votre enfant fait de la fièvre.</li></ul><h2>La moelle attachée peut causer des problèmes de contrôle vésical et intestinal ou de la difficulté à marcher</h2> <p>Les signes les plus fréquents de la moelle attachée sont les suivants :</p> <ul> <li>Absence de contrôle vésical : quand les nerfs dans la colonne vertébrale de votre enfant sont étirés, votre enfant pourrait ne pas ressentir le besoin d’uriner et mouiller sa culotte.</li> <li>Absence de contrôle intestinal : les nerfs qui contrôlent l’intestin pourraient aussi être étirés. Votre enfant pourrait ne pas être en mesure de contrôler ses selles.</li> <li>Douleur au dos</li> <li>Courbure de la colonne</li> <li>Difficulté à marcher aussi bien qu’avant</li> </ul><h2>Qu’est-ce qui cause la moelle attachée?</h2> <p>La cause n’est pas toujours connue. Nous savons que :</p> <ul> <li>elle est parfois rattachée au spina bifida.</li> <li>elle est présente à la naissance pour certains enfants.</li> </ul> <p>La moelle attachée survient quand quelque chose s’accroche à la moelle épinière et ne la laisse pas se déplacer aisément. Habituellement, la moelle s’attache à l’une de ces choses : </p> <ul> <li>un ligament serré : un ligament, qui ressemble à une corde, se trouve dans le dos de votre enfant. Il s’appelle filum terminalae (fil-om-ter-mi-na-lé). Normalement, il s’étire, mais parfois, il se resserre et s’attache à la moelle épinière.</li> <li>une cicatrice : si votre enfant a été opéré au dos, une cicatrice peut se former autour du bas de la moelle épinière et s’y lier;</li> <li>un os : parfois, un morceau d’os peut se lier à une partie de la moelle épinière;</li> <li>du gras : parfois, du gras s’accumule dans la moelle et autour de la moelle épinière, et s’y attache. </li> </ul><h2>Votre enfant devra subir des tests</h2> <p>Habituellement les parents remarquent un ou plusieurs signes et consultent un médecin avec leur enfant. Si le médecin pense que votre enfant a la moelle attachée, il fera des tests.</p> <h3>IRM</h3> <p>Dans ce test, un aimant et des ondes radio prennent des photos de l’intérieur du corps de votre enfant. Le test est indolore. Parfois, votre enfant devra prendre des médicaments au moyen d’une aiguille pour l’une ou l’autre des raisons suivantes :</p> <ul> <li>pour qu’il reste tranquille pendant le test;</li> <li>pour que nous puisions voir l’intérieur du dos plus clairement.</li> </ul> <p>Pour une IRM, votre enfant doit demeurer immobile pendant que les photos sont prises. Certains enfants ont besoin d’un sédatif pour rester immobiles pendant les tests.</p> <h3>Consultation en urologie</h3> <p>Si votre enfant a des problèmes à uriner, le médecin pourrait vous recommander à un autre médecin, appelé urologue. Ce médecin mènera des tests sur la vessie.</p><h2>La moelle attachée se traite au moyen d’une opération</h2> <p>Si l’étirement de la moelle épinière cause des problèmes, votre enfant pourrait devoir se faire opérer. Au cours de cette opération, il faut ouvrir le dos et la colonne vertébrale pour dégager la moelle épinière, pour qu’elle puisse se déplacer librement. C’est ce qu’on appelle une laminectomie. Si on ne fait pas l’opération, l’étirement pourrait empirer, ainsi que les problèmes qu’il cause. </p> <p>Si la moelle épinière de votre enfant a déjà été endommagée, une opération pourrait ne pas corriger les dommages.</p> <h3>Ce qui se passe pendant l’opération</h3> <p>Votre enfant recevra un médicament spécial pour l’endormir, appelé anesthésique général, pour faire en sorte que votre enfant dorme pendant l’opération. Une incision (coupure) est pratiquée dans le dos de votre enfant.</p> <p>Le chirurgien coupera un morceau d’os de la colonne vertébrale où la moelle est attachée. Le chirurgien coupera et dégagera ensuite ce qui retient la moelle épinière, ce qui la laissera libre de bouger.</p> <p>L’opération prend environ trois heures.</p> <h2>Après l’opération</h2> <p>Après l’opération, votre enfant sera transféré à l’unité de soins postopératoires, où il demeurera pendant deux à quatre heures. Il retournera ensuite à l’unité de neurochirurgie.</p> <p>Votre enfant aura un pansement spécial au dos. L’infirmière ira souvent le vérifier, ainsi que la température, le rythme cardiaque, la tension artérielle, la respiration et les mouvements des jambes de votre enfant. </p> <p>Votre enfant aura un petit tube dans le bras, appelé intraveineux (IV). Il nous laisse donner des liquides et des médicaments directement dans la circulation sanguine de votre enfant.</p> <h3>Votre enfant devra rester couché sur le dos pendant deux à trois jours</h3> <p>Pendant les deux à trois jours qui suivront l’opération, votre enfant devra rester couché sur le dos dans son lit. Cela empêchera l’écoulement de liquide en provenance de la moelle épinière. Ne laissez pas votre enfant se lever avant l’autorisation du chirurgien . </p> <p>L’infirmière changera votre enfant de position toutes les deux à quatre heures, pour éviter que des plaies se développement à force de demeurer dans la même position. Cela préviendra aussi tout problème respiratoire après l’opération.</p> <h3>Votre enfant recevra des médicaments contre la douleur</h3> <p>Votre enfant pourrait ressentir de la douleur au site de l’opération. Habituellement, l’enfant recevra de la morphine au moyen de l’IV pendant une à deux journées, ce qui devrait contrôler la douleur. Dans le cas contraire, parlez-en à l’infirmière de votre enfant. </p> <p>Après une à deux journées, la dose de morphine sera diminuée, et votre enfant commencera à prendre des médicaments par la bouche.</p> <p>Votre enfant pourrait aussi apprendre d’autres moyens de contrôler la douleur, comme souffler des bulles ou des exercices de respiration. Demandez à l’infirmière ou au spécialiste des enfants d’aider votre enfant et vous à apprendre ces techniques.</p> <h3>Votre enfant demeurera probablement à l’hôpital pendant une semaine</h3> <p>Tous les enfants se rétablissent à un rythme différent. La plupart des enfants vont demeurer à l’hôpital pendant environ une semaine. Quand votre enfant ira mieux, le chirurgien décidera quand il pourra retourner à la maison.</p><h2>Après le retour à la maison</h2> <p>Signalez-le au chirurgien de votre enfant si vous remarquez l’un ou l’autre des signes suivants. Ils pourraient indiquer une infection dans la moelle épinière :</p> <ul> <li>liquide qui s’écoule de l’incision;</li> <li>accumulation de liquide (gonflement) à l’incision;</li> <li>rougeur;</li> <li>enflure;</li> <li>écoulement nauséabond de l’incision;</li> <li>fièvre.</li> </ul> <p>Surveillez également les signes suivants :</p> <ul> <li>changements dans la fonction vésicale ou intestinale;</li> <li>douleur au dos;</li> <li>difficulté à marcher;</li> <li>changements dans le mouvement des bras et des jambes;</li> <li>irritabilité (mauvaise humeur).</li> </ul> <p>Si vous avez des inquiétudes, parlez-en au chirurgien de votre enfant.</p>

 

 

Tethered cord861.000000000000Tethered cordTethered cordTEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BackSpinal CordConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZMary Douglas, RN, KRN, BScN, MN, TNCC;James Drake, BSE, MB, BCh, MSc, FRCSC;Patricia Rowe, RN, BScN, MN, NP Peds;Sheila Rowed, RN, BScN, CNN(C);Shobhan Vachhrajani, MD6.0000000000000079.00000000000001699.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Tethered cord occurs when the spinal cord gets stuck to the bottom of the spinal column and is stretched. Learn about how tethered cord is treated. </p><h2>What is a tethered cord?</h2><p>The "cord" in "tethered cord" is the spinal cord. The spinal cord is the bundle of nerves that carries messages between the brain and the body.</p><p>Before a baby is born, the spinal cord is normally the same length as the bones that surround it. These bones are called the spinal column. As the baby grows, the spinal column gets longer than the spinal cord. This means the spinal cord has to be able to move freely inside the spinal column. But in some babies, the bottom end (tail) of the spinal cord is "tethered" or tied down to the bottom end of the spinal column. This is called tethered cord.</p><p>Tethered cord means the spinal cord cannot move inside the spinal column. As the child grows taller, the spinal cord is stretched. If the nerves are stretched, they may not work properly, and this can cause problems for your child. Your child may need an operation to help the spinal cord move freely.</p><p>The information on this page will help you explain tethered cord to your child, using words your child can understand.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Tethered cord</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Tethered_cord_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Tethered cord means the spinal cord cannot move freely inside the spinal column. Two of the most common causes of tethered cord are shown above: Lipomeningocele (fatty growth) and scar tissue following back surgery.</figcaption> </figure><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Tethered cord means that your child's spinal cord cannot move freely inside their spinal column. The spinal cord is stretched. </li> <li>Tethered cord can cause problems with bladder control, bowel control or walking. </li> <li>Tethered cord may be treated with surgery (an operation) to release the stretching of the spinal cord. </li> <li>Your child will probably stay in hospital for about one week. </li> <li>Call your child's surgeon if you notice any fluid leaking out of your child's surgical cut; if you see bulging, redness, swelling or smelly discharge from the cut; or if your child has a fever. </li> </ul><h2>Tethered cord can cause lack of bladder and bowel control or problems walking</h2> <p>The most common signs of a tethered cord are the following:</p> <ul> <li>Lack of bladder control: When nerves in your child's spinal cord are stretched, your child may not be able to feel when they need to pee. They may wet their pants. </li> <li>Lack of bowel control: The nerves that control the bowel may also be stretched. Your child may not be able to control their bowel movements. </li> <li>Back pain </li> <li>Curving of the spine </li> <li>Trouble walking as well as before </li> </ul><h2>What causes a tethered cord?</h2> <p>The cause of a tethered cord is not always known. We do know that:</p> <ul> <li>It is sometimes found with spina bifida. </li> <li>It is present from birth in some children. </li> </ul> <p>Tethered cord happens when something catches hold of the spinal cord and does not let it move freely. Usually, one of these things catches the cord: </p> <ul> <li>A tight ligament: There is a ligament, like a string, in your child's back called the filum terminale (say: FILL-um term-in-ALL-ay). Normally it is stretchy, but sometimes it is tight and tethers the cord. </li> <li>A scar: If your child has had back surgery, a scar can form around the bottom end of the cord. This can "catch" the spinal cord. </li> <li>Bone: Sometimes, a piece of bone can catch a part of the spinal cord. </li> <li>Fat: Sometimes, fat grows in and around the spinal cord and catches hold of it. </li> </ul><h2>Your child will need tests</h2> <p>Usually, parents notice one or more signs and bring their child to the doctor. If the doctor thinks your child has a tethered cord, they will do some tests. </p> <h3>MRI</h3> <p>In this test, a magnet and radio waves are used to take pictures of the inside of your child's body. The test does not hurt. Sometimes your child will need to take medicine through a needle for one of the following reasons: </p> <ul> <li>to help your child to stay still during the test </li> <li>to help the doctor to see the inside of the back more clearly </li> </ul> <p>MRI requires your child to stay still while the pictures are being taken. Some children need sedation medicine to help them keep still during the tests. </p> <h3>Urology consultation</h3> <p>If your child is having problems with peeing, the doctor may send you to see another doctor called a urologist. This doctor will do tests on your child's bladder. </p><h2>Tethered cord may be treated with surgery</h2> <p>When the stretching of the spinal cord causes problems, your child may need surgery (an operation). This operation involves opening the back and the spinal column in order to release the spinal cord so it can move freely. The operation is called a laminectomy. If the operation is not done, the stretching may get worse. The problems caused by the stretching may also get worse. </p> <p>If your child's spinal cord has already been damaged, surgery may not fix the damage.</p> <h3>What happens during the operation</h3> <p>Your child will have a special "sleep medicine" called a general anesthetic. This will make your child'sleep through the operation. An incision (cut) is made on your child's back. </p> <p>The surgeon will cut a piece of bone from the spinal column where the cord is tethered. Then the surgeon will cut and release what is holding the cord to the spinal column. This will let the spinal cord move freely. </p> <p>The operation takes about three hours.</p> <h2>After the operation</h2> <p>After the operation, your child will spend about two to four hours in the Post Anaesthetic Care Unit (PACU). Then your child will go back to the Neurosurgical Unit. </p> <p>Your child will have a bandage on their back. The nurse will check the bandage often. The nurse will also check your child's temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, breathing and leg movements. </p> <p>Your child will have a thin tube in their arm. This is called an intravenous (IV) tube. It allows fluids and medicines to be given directly into your child's bloodstream. </p> <h3>Your child needs to lie flat for two to three days</h3> <p>For the first two to three days after the operation, your child needs to lie flat in bed. This is to prevent leakage of fluid from around the spinal cord. Do not let your child sit up until the surgeon says this is OK. </p> <p>The nurse will turn your child from side to side about every two to four hours. This will help prevent sores that may develop from lying in bed. It will also help prevent any chest problems after surgery. </p> <h3>Your child will have medicine for pain</h3> <p>Your child may feel pain at the operative site. Usually, your child will have <a href="/Article?contentid=194&language=English">morphine</a> through their intravenous line (IV) for one or two days. This should control the pain. If it does not control the pain, speak to your child's nurse. </p> <p>After one or two days, the morphine drip will be slowed down and your child will take pain medicine by mouth.</p> <p>Your child may also learn other ways to control pain, such as blowing bubbles or relaxation breathing. Ask your nurse or the Child Life specialist to help you and your child learn how to do this. </p> <h3>Your child will probably stay in hospital for about one week</h3> <p>Each child gets better at a different rate. Most children stay in hospital for about one week. After your child gets better from the operation, your child's surgeon will decide when they can go home. </p><h2>Going home</h2> <p>Before you take your child home, the surgeon or the nurse will explain how to take care of your child at home. The instructions will include the following: </p> <ul> <li>how to take care of your child's incision (cut) </li> <li>what to do with your child's stitches or staples </li> <li>how to tell if your child's incision becomes infected </li> <li>other things to watch for </li> <li>what activities your child is able to do </li> </ul> <h3>Taking care of your child's incision</h3> <p>Watch your child's incision (cut) to make sure it is healing well. It is all right if the incision gets wet in the bath or shower. Your surgeon and a nurse will discuss with you how long to wait before your child can have a bath or shower.</p> <h3>Taking care of your child's stitches</h3> <p>How your child's staples or stitches are taken out depends on the type of staple or stitch that was used. Your surgeon or nurse will tell you what type of stitches were used. </p> <ul> <li>If your child has staples or stitches that need to be taken out, your family doctor will need to do this. The stitches should be taken out about seven to 10 days after the operation. Staples should be removed about 10 days after the operation. Your surgeon will tell you when they need to come out. </li> <li>If staples were used, you will be given a special remover to take to your family doctor. </li> <li>If your child has the kind of stitches that dissolve on their own, you can see your family doctor to have the incision line checked, but the stitches will not need to be taken out. </li> </ul><h2>After your child goes home</h2> <p>Tell your child's surgeon if you notice any of the following things. These mean that your child's cut could be infected:</p> <ul> <li>fluid leaking out of the surgical cut </li> <li>fluid collection (bulging) at the cut </li> <li>redness </li> <li>swelling </li> <li>smelly discharge from the cut </li> <li>fever </li> </ul> <p>Also watch your child for the following:</p> <ul> <li>changes in bladder or bowel function </li> <li>back pain </li> <li>trouble walking </li> <li>changes in movement of the arms and legs </li> <li>irritability (crankiness) </li> </ul> <p>If you have any concerns, contact your child's surgeon.</p><h2>Following up after the operation</h2> <p>The surgeon will see your child in a follow-up clinic visit about six weeks after your child goes home. The appointment may be made for you when your child is discharged. If not, call the neurosurgery clinic to make an appointment. </p> <p>Write down the date and time here:</p> <p> </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Tethered_cord_MED_ILL_EN.jpgTethered cord

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