AboutKidsHealth

 

 

Wilson diseaseWWilson diseaseWilson diseaseEnglishGeneticsChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Brain;LiverLiver;BrainConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2013-06-12T04:00:00ZBinita M. Kamath MBBChir;Alison Stewart RN, BScN7.0000000000000066.00000000000001028.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Wilson disease is a genetic disorder that allows copper to build up in the body. Learn about how it is diagnosed and treated.</p><h2>What is Wilson disease?</h2> <p>Wilson disease is a genetic disorder that allows copper to build up in the body and cause damage.</p> <h3>Our body needs a small amount of copper</h3> <p>To work well, our body needs a small amount copper. Copper is a metallic element. It helps keep the immune system healthy, build strong bones and form red blood cells. We absorb copper from a variety of food such a nuts, seeds, oysters and liver. Normally, our bodies regularly dispose of copper to prevent it from accumulating in the body.</p> <h3>Too much copper damages the tissues</h3> <p>Some children are unable to get rid of copper. This inability is a disorder called Wilson disease. The excess copper is stored in the main organs, such as the liver, brain, kidneys and eyes. In the liver, extra copper causes damage and scarring. This causes the liver to stop working correctly.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Wilson disease is a genetic disorder that allows copper to damage the liver.</li> <li>Children are born with Wilson disease.</li> <li>Doctors diagnose Wilson disease by taking blood tests, urine samples, liver biopsy and a genetic test.</li> <li>Treatment requires a life-long commitment to eating a low-copper diet and taking prescription medicines.</li> <li>After treatment starts, the health care team will book follow-up appointments to monitor your child.</li> </ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of Wilson disease</h2><p>Symptoms are more likely in children 10 years and older. In Wilson disease, copper usually accumulates in the liver and brain. This is why symptoms are mainly liver disease and neurological problems.</p> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_wilson_disease_affected_organs_EN.jpg" alt="Upper body of a child with brain and liver identified" /> </figure> <h3>Symptoms of liver disease</h3><ul><li>tiredness</li><li>yellow skin (<a href="/Article?contentid=775&language=English">jaundice</a>) or yellow colour of the white of the eyes</li><li>enlargement of the abdomen</li><li>vomiting blood</li></ul><h3>Symptoms of neurological problems</h3><ul><li>confusion<br></li><li>emotional or behavioral changes such as depression, anxiety and psychosis</li><li>slow or decreased movement</li><li>slurred speech</li><li>tremors in the hands</li><li>clumsiness</li><li>worsening of academic performance</li></ul><h2>Wilson Disease is a genetic disease</h2><p>A change or mutation in a gene causes Wilson disease. Children are born with it.</p><p>If a person has one copy of this gene they are a carrier of the disease. About one in 100 people carry this gene. A child needs to be born with two copies of the gene to develop the disease. If both parents carry the gene for Wilson disease, there is a 25% chance their child will have the disorder.</p> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_wilson_disease_inheritance_EN.jpg" alt="Chromosome distribution from parents carrying Wilson disease" /> </figure> <h2>How common is Wilson disease?</h2><p>About one in 30,000 people have Wilson disease. It is most common in eastern Europeans, Sicilians and southern Italians. Wilson disease typically appears in people under 20 years old. In children, it is rarely diagnosed before the age of four years. Younger children rarely show any symptoms. Doctors suspect Wilson disease during routine blood tests.</p><br><h2>Diagnosis of Wilson disease</h2> <p>If your child experiences the symptoms listed above or there is a known family history, the doctor may suspect Wilson disease.</p> <h3>Blood tests</h3> <p>To help confirm the diagnosis, the doctor will take a sample of your child's blood. They will test for:</p> <ul> <li>The amount of copper in the blood.</li> <li>The presence of liver enzymes. High levels of these enzymes mean the liver cells are damaged.</li> <li>The amount of a liver protein called albumin. Albumin levels decrease in the blood when the liver is damaged.</li> <li>How long it takes for the blood to clot</li> <li>The amount of a protein which transports copper in the blood, called ceruloplasmin. Its levels are lower in Wilson disease.</li> </ul> <p>The health care team will arrange for you to collect your child's urine over a 24 hour period. This will be explained in more detail when you are in clinic. They test the urine for copper levels.</p> <p>Excess copper in the eyes can cause dark rings to form around the iris. These are called Kayser-Fleischer rings. They are difficult to see without a special eye exam. Your child's doctor may do an eye exam to check for these rings. However, the absense of the Kayser-Fleischer rings does not rule out the disease.</p> <p>Your child's health care team may do other tests such as an <a href="/Article?contentid=1290&language=English">ultrasound</a> of the abdomen and a <a href="/Article?contentid=1272&language=English">CT scan</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=1270&language=English">MRI</a> of the brain.</p> <h3>Liver biopsy</h3> <p>After finding signs that suggest Wilson disease, your child's doctor will take a sample of the liver. They check for specific changes in the liver. They also measure the amount of copper in the liver.</p> <h3>Genetic test for Wilson disease</h3> <p>The doctor may use a sample of your child's blood to run a genetic test for the Wilson disease gene. You will likely wait several weeks before finding out the results of the test.</p><h2>Treatment for Wilson disease</h2> <p>Wilson disease is a life-long disease. However, your child can lead a better quality of life and avoid serious complications by carefully following the treatment plan.</p> <p>The goal of treatment is to lower the amount of copper in the tissues. It requires a life-long commitment, which involves: </p><h3>Eating a low copper diet</h3> <p>Your child should try to avoid eating the following copper-rich foods:</p> <ul> <li>chocolate</li> <li>dried fruit</li> <li>mushrooms</li> <li>nuts</li> <li>liver</li> <li>shell fish</li> </ul> <h3>Taking prescribed medicines</h3> <ul> <li>Zinc tablets which helps block copper from being absorbed in your intestines</li> <li>Penicillamine or trientene. These medicines bind with copper in the body and then both are excreted in the urine.</li> </ul> <h3>Continual monitoring</h3> <p>Your child's health care team will book follow-up appointments to:</p> <ul> <li>Ensure they are consistently taking medicines. Do routine blood tests to check the levels of liver enzymes and copper. This happens every four to six months.</li> <li>Collect urine samples for 24 hours to check for copper levels. Your child's health care team will do this about one to two times a year.</li> </ul> <h3>Liver transplant</h3> <p>In more serious cases, your child may be considered for a liver transplant. If this is an option for your child, the doctor will discuss the procedure more clearly with you.</p> <h2>Communicate with your child's health care team</h2> <p>Wilson's disease is a life-long condition. It is important to maintain open communication with your child's health care team. <a href="/Article?contentid=1144&language=English">Talk openly with the doctor</a> if you have any questions or concerns about your child's treatment. Make sure you update the doctor with any new symptoms your child may experience. Remember the health care team is there to support you and your child.</p>
Maladie de WilsonMMaladie de WilsonWilson diseaseFrenchGeneticsChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Brain;LiverLiver;BrainConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2013-06-12T04:00:00ZBinita M. Kamath MBBChir;Alison Stewart RN, BScN7.0000000000000066.00000000000001028.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>La maladie de Wilson est une maladie génétique. Apprenez-en plus à son sujet et découvrez comment vous pouvez aider votre enfant s’il en souffre</p><h2>Qu’est-ce que la maladie de Wilson?</h2> <p>La maladie de Wilson est une maladie génétique qui occasionne une accumulation de cuivre dans l’organisme, ce qui entraîne des risques pour la santé.</p> <h3>Notre corps a besoin d’une petite quantité de cuivre</h3> <p>Pour bien fonctionner, notre corps a besoin d’une petite quantité de cuivre. Le cuivre est un élément métallique. Il contribue à maintenir le système immunitaire en santé, à avoir les os solides et à produire des globules rouges. Nous absorbons du cuivre à partir d’une variété d’aliments comme les noix, les graines, les huîtres et le foie. Normalement, notre corps élimine naturellement le cuivre afin d’en éviter l’accumulation.</p> <h3>Trop de cuivre endommage les tissus</h3> <p>Certains enfants sont incapables de se débarrasser du cuivre que leur corps absorbe. Cette incapacité est appelée maladie de Wilson. L’excédent de cuivre est stocké dans les principaux organes comme le foie, le cerveau, les reins et les yeux. Dans le foie, l’excédent de cuivre provoque des dommages et des lésions, ce qui peut perturber son fonctionnement.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>La maladie de Wilson est une maladie génétique. Quand on en souffre, le cuivre peut endommager le foie.</li> <li>La maladie de Wilson est présente chez l’enfant dès la naissance.</li> <li>Les médecins diagnostiquent la maladie de Wilson en procédant à des analyses de sang, d’urine, à une biopsie du foie et à un test génétique.</li> <li>Le traitement nécessite de s’engager tout au long de la vie à suivre un régime alimentaire pauvre en cuivre et à prendre des médicaments disponibles sur ordonnance.</li> <li>Après le début du traitement, l’équipe de soins de santé de votre enfant fixera des rendez-vous de suivi pour surveiller son état.</li> </ul><h2>Les signes et les symptômes de la maladie de Wilson</h2><p>Les symptômes se manifestent le plus souvent chez les enfants de 10 ans ou plus. S’ils souffrent de la maladie, une quantité de cuivre s’accumule habituellement dans leur foie et leur cerveau. C’est la raison pour laquelle les symptômes sont principalement des maladies du foie et des troubles neurologiques.</p> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_wilson_disease_affected_organs_FR.jpg" alt="L'emplacement du cerveau et du foie dans le haut du corps d’un enfant" /> </figure> <h3>Les symptômes de la maladie du foie</h3><ul><li>La fatigue</li><li>La peau jaune (jaunisse) ou le jaunissement du blanc des yeux</li><li>L’élargissement de l’abdomen</li><li>Des vomissements de sang</li></ul><h3>Les symptômes de problèmes neurologiques</h3><ul><li>La confusion</li><li>Des changements affectifs ou comportementaux comme la dépression, l’anxiété et la psychose</li><li>Des mouvements lents ou la diminution de la mobilité</li><li>Des troubles de l’élocution</li><li>Des tremblements des mains</li><li>La maladresse</li><li>De mauvais résultats scolaires </li></ul><h2>La maladie de Wilson est une maladie génétique</h2><p>Le changement ou la mutation d’un gène provoque la maladie de Wilson. Ce gène transformé est présent chez l’enfant dès la naissance.</p><p>Si une personne a une copie de ce gène, elle est porteuse de la maladie. C’est le cas d’une personne sur cent. Pour développer la maladie, un enfant doit naître avec 2 copies du gène. Si les deux parents sont porteurs du gène de la maladie de Wilson, il y a un risque de 25 % que leur enfant soit atteint de la maladie. </p> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_wilson_disease_inheritance_FR.jpg" alt="Distribution des chromosomes des parents porteurs de la maladie Wilson" /> </figure> <h2>La maladie de Wilson est-elle courante?</h2><p>Environ 1 personne sur 30 000 est atteinte de la maladie de Wilson. Celle-ci est plus courante chez les Européens de l’Est, les Siciliens, et les Italiens du Sud. La maladie de Wilson apparaît généralement chez les personnes de moins de 20 ans. Chez les enfants, elle est rarement diagnostiquée avant l’âge de 4 ans et, avant cet âge, les jeunes enfants présentent rarement des symptômes. Les médecins pourraient soupçonner que votre enfant souffre de la maladie de Wilson suite à des analyses de sang de routine. </p><h2>Le diagnostic de la maladie de Wilson</h2> <p>Si votre enfant présente certains des symptômes ci-dessus ou en cas d’antécédents familiaux, son médecin pourrait soupçonner qu’il souffre de la maladie de Wilson.</p> <h3>Des analyses de sang</h3> <p>Pour aider à confirmer ce diagnostic, le médecin prélèvera un échantillon de sang de votre enfant et le fera analyser pour déterminer :</p> <ul> <li>La quantité de cuivre dans le sang</li> <li>La présence d’enzymes hépatiques. Des taux élevés de ces enzymes signifient que les cellules du foie sont endommagées.</li> <li>Le taux d’albumine, une protéine du foie. Les taux d’albumine dans le sang diminuent lorsque le foie est endommagé.</li> <li>Le temps nécessaire à la coagulation du sang</li> <li>Le taux de céruloplasmine, une protéine qui transporte le cuivre dans le sang. Ce taux est plus faible chez les patients atteints de la maladie de Wilson.</li> </ul> <p>L’équipe de soins de santé de votre enfant se chargera pour vous de recueillir son urine sur une période de 24 heures. Cela vous sera expliqué plus en détail à la clinique. L’urine sera analysée pour déterminer le taux de cuivre qu’elle contient. </p> <p>L’excès de cuivre dans les yeux peut causer la formation de cernes autour de l’iris. On les appelle anneaux de Kayser-Fleischer. Ils sont difficiles à observer sans un examen oculaire particulier. Le médecin de votre enfant pourrait procéder à cet examen pour déterminer la présence de ces anneaux. Cependant, leur absence ne signifie pas nécessairement que votre enfant n’est pas atteint de la maladie.</p> <p>L’équipe de soins de santé de votre enfant pourrait procéder à d’autres analyses comme une <a href="/Article?contentid=1290&language=French">échographie </a>de l’abdomen, un<a href="/Article?contentid=1272&language=French"> tomodensitogramme </a> ou une <a href="/Article?contentid=1270&language=French">IRM</a> cérébrale.</p> <h3>La biopsie du foie</h3> <p>Après avoir trouvé des signes qui suggèrent la maladie de Wilson, le médecin prélèvera un échantillon du foie de votre enfant afin d’y observer certains changements spécifiques. Il mesurera également la quantité de cuivre qu’il contient.</p> <h3>Le test génétique pour la maladie de Wilson</h3> <p>Le médecin pourrait utiliser un échantillon du sang de votre enfant afin de procéder à un test génétique visant à déterminer la présence du gène de la maladie de Wilson. Vous devrez probablement attendre plusieurs semaines avant de connaître les résultats de ce test. </p><h2>Le traitement de la maladie de Wilson</h2> <p>La maladie de Wilson est une maladie dont on souffre toute la vie. Toutefois, la qualité de vie de votre enfant peut être améliorée et il peut éviter les complications graves en suivant attentivement un plan de traitement.</p> <p>Le but du traitement est de réduire la quantité de cuivre dans les tissus. Il devra être suivi tout au long de la vie, ce qui nécessite de/d’ : </p><h3>Suivre un régime alimentaire à faible teneur en cuivre</h3> <p>Votre enfant devrait essayer d’éviter de manger des aliments riches en cuivre comme :</p> <ul> <li>le chocolat</li> <li>les fruits secs</li> <li>les champignons</li> <li>les noisettes</li> <li>le foie</li> <li>les crustacés</li> </ul> <h3>Prendre les médicaments prescrits</h3> <ul> <li>Les comprimés de zinc aident à limiter l’absorption du cuivre dans l’appareil digestif</li> <li>La pénicillamine ou la trientene. Ces médicaments se fixent au cuivre présent dans le corps, ce qui permet son élimination dans l’urine.</li> </ul> <h3>Assurer une surveillance continue</h3> <p>L’équipe de soins de santé de votre enfant fixera des rendez-vous de suivi visant à :</p> <ul> <li>s’assurer qu’il prend bien ses médicaments, procéder à des analyses de sang de routine pour vérifier les taux d’enzymes hépatiques et de cuivre. Ces analyses auront lieu tous les quatre à six mois.</li> <li>recueillir des échantillons d’urine pendant 24 heures pour vérifier les taux de cuivre. L’équipe de soins de santé de votre enfant faire cela une à deux fois par an.</li> </ul> <h3>La greffe du foie</h3> <p>Si son cas est grave, on pourrait envisager de procéder à une greffe du foie pour votre enfant. Dans ce cas, le médecin discutera plus clairement avec vous de la procédure. </p> <h2>Communiquez avec l’équipe de soins de santé de votre enfant</h2> <p>La maladie de Wilson est une maladie dont on souffre toute la vie. Il est important de maintenir une communication ouverte avec l’équipe de soins de santé de votre enfant. <a href="/Article?contentid=1144&language=French">Parlez ouvertement avec le médecin​ </a> si vous avez des questions ou des préoccupations au sujet du traitement de votre enfant. Assurez-vous de l’informer de tout nouveau symptôme que votre enfant pourrait éprouver. Rappelez-vous que l’équipe de soins de santé est là pour vous aider, votre enfant et vous. </p>

 

 

Wilson disease881.000000000000Wilson diseaseWilson diseaseWEnglishGeneticsChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Brain;LiverLiver;BrainConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2013-06-12T04:00:00ZBinita M. Kamath MBBChir;Alison Stewart RN, BScN7.0000000000000066.00000000000001028.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Wilson disease is a genetic disorder that allows copper to build up in the body. Learn about how it is diagnosed and treated.</p><h2>What is Wilson disease?</h2> <p>Wilson disease is a genetic disorder that allows copper to build up in the body and cause damage.</p> <h3>Our body needs a small amount of copper</h3> <p>To work well, our body needs a small amount copper. Copper is a metallic element. It helps keep the immune system healthy, build strong bones and form red blood cells. We absorb copper from a variety of food such a nuts, seeds, oysters and liver. Normally, our bodies regularly dispose of copper to prevent it from accumulating in the body.</p> <h3>Too much copper damages the tissues</h3> <p>Some children are unable to get rid of copper. This inability is a disorder called Wilson disease. The excess copper is stored in the main organs, such as the liver, brain, kidneys and eyes. In the liver, extra copper causes damage and scarring. This causes the liver to stop working correctly.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Wilson disease is a genetic disorder that allows copper to damage the liver.</li> <li>Children are born with Wilson disease.</li> <li>Doctors diagnose Wilson disease by taking blood tests, urine samples, liver biopsy and a genetic test.</li> <li>Treatment requires a life-long commitment to eating a low-copper diet and taking prescription medicines.</li> <li>After treatment starts, the health care team will book follow-up appointments to monitor your child.</li> </ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of Wilson disease</h2><p>Symptoms are more likely in children 10 years and older. In Wilson disease, copper usually accumulates in the liver and brain. This is why symptoms are mainly liver disease and neurological problems.</p> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_wilson_disease_affected_organs_EN.jpg" alt="Upper body of a child with brain and liver identified" /> </figure> <h3>Symptoms of liver disease</h3><ul><li>tiredness</li><li>yellow skin (<a href="/Article?contentid=775&language=English">jaundice</a>) or yellow colour of the white of the eyes</li><li>enlargement of the abdomen</li><li>vomiting blood</li></ul><h3>Symptoms of neurological problems</h3><ul><li>confusion<br></li><li>emotional or behavioral changes such as depression, anxiety and psychosis</li><li>slow or decreased movement</li><li>slurred speech</li><li>tremors in the hands</li><li>clumsiness</li><li>worsening of academic performance</li></ul><h2>Wilson Disease is a genetic disease</h2><p>A change or mutation in a gene causes Wilson disease. Children are born with it.</p><p>If a person has one copy of this gene they are a carrier of the disease. About one in 100 people carry this gene. A child needs to be born with two copies of the gene to develop the disease. If both parents carry the gene for Wilson disease, there is a 25% chance their child will have the disorder.</p> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_wilson_disease_inheritance_EN.jpg" alt="Chromosome distribution from parents carrying Wilson disease" /> </figure> <h2>How common is Wilson disease?</h2><p>About one in 30,000 people have Wilson disease. It is most common in eastern Europeans, Sicilians and southern Italians. Wilson disease typically appears in people under 20 years old. In children, it is rarely diagnosed before the age of four years. Younger children rarely show any symptoms. Doctors suspect Wilson disease during routine blood tests.</p><br><h2>Diagnosis of Wilson disease</h2> <p>If your child experiences the symptoms listed above or there is a known family history, the doctor may suspect Wilson disease.</p> <h3>Blood tests</h3> <p>To help confirm the diagnosis, the doctor will take a sample of your child's blood. They will test for:</p> <ul> <li>The amount of copper in the blood.</li> <li>The presence of liver enzymes. High levels of these enzymes mean the liver cells are damaged.</li> <li>The amount of a liver protein called albumin. Albumin levels decrease in the blood when the liver is damaged.</li> <li>How long it takes for the blood to clot</li> <li>The amount of a protein which transports copper in the blood, called ceruloplasmin. Its levels are lower in Wilson disease.</li> </ul> <p>The health care team will arrange for you to collect your child's urine over a 24 hour period. This will be explained in more detail when you are in clinic. They test the urine for copper levels.</p> <p>Excess copper in the eyes can cause dark rings to form around the iris. These are called Kayser-Fleischer rings. They are difficult to see without a special eye exam. Your child's doctor may do an eye exam to check for these rings. However, the absense of the Kayser-Fleischer rings does not rule out the disease.</p> <p>Your child's health care team may do other tests such as an <a href="/Article?contentid=1290&language=English">ultrasound</a> of the abdomen and a <a href="/Article?contentid=1272&language=English">CT scan</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=1270&language=English">MRI</a> of the brain.</p> <h3>Liver biopsy</h3> <p>After finding signs that suggest Wilson disease, your child's doctor will take a sample of the liver. They check for specific changes in the liver. They also measure the amount of copper in the liver.</p> <h3>Genetic test for Wilson disease</h3> <p>The doctor may use a sample of your child's blood to run a genetic test for the Wilson disease gene. You will likely wait several weeks before finding out the results of the test.</p><h2>Treatment for Wilson disease</h2> <p>Wilson disease is a life-long disease. However, your child can lead a better quality of life and avoid serious complications by carefully following the treatment plan.</p> <p>The goal of treatment is to lower the amount of copper in the tissues. It requires a life-long commitment, which involves: </p><h3>Eating a low copper diet</h3> <p>Your child should try to avoid eating the following copper-rich foods:</p> <ul> <li>chocolate</li> <li>dried fruit</li> <li>mushrooms</li> <li>nuts</li> <li>liver</li> <li>shell fish</li> </ul> <h3>Taking prescribed medicines</h3> <ul> <li>Zinc tablets which helps block copper from being absorbed in your intestines</li> <li>Penicillamine or trientene. These medicines bind with copper in the body and then both are excreted in the urine.</li> </ul> <h3>Continual monitoring</h3> <p>Your child's health care team will book follow-up appointments to:</p> <ul> <li>Ensure they are consistently taking medicines. Do routine blood tests to check the levels of liver enzymes and copper. This happens every four to six months.</li> <li>Collect urine samples for 24 hours to check for copper levels. Your child's health care team will do this about one to two times a year.</li> </ul> <h3>Liver transplant</h3> <p>In more serious cases, your child may be considered for a liver transplant. If this is an option for your child, the doctor will discuss the procedure more clearly with you.</p> <h2>Communicate with your child's health care team</h2> <p>Wilson's disease is a life-long condition. It is important to maintain open communication with your child's health care team. <a href="/Article?contentid=1144&language=English">Talk openly with the doctor</a> if you have any questions or concerns about your child's treatment. Make sure you update the doctor with any new symptoms your child may experience. Remember the health care team is there to support you and your child.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_wilson_disease_affected_organs_EN.jpgWilson diseaseFalse

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.