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Diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS)DDiarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS)Diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS)EnglishNephrologyBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)KidneysKidneysConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-12-29T05:00:00ZRose Nemec, RN;Keturah Tomlin, RN;Elizabeth Harvey, MD, FRCPC7.0000000000000069.00000000000001335.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a disease that affects the kidneys and other organs. This page explains what HUS is, how it affects your child, and what to expect during treatment.</p><h2>What is hemolytic uremic syndrome?</h2> <p>Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a disease that affects the kidneys and other organs. </p> <p>"Hemolytic" means "blood breakdown." "Uremic" means "urea in the blood" (urea is a waste product). So HUS is a condition where the blood breaks down and waste products build up in the blood. HUS is very serious, but with proper care most children recover completely. </p> <p>This page explains what HUS is, how it affects your child, and what to expect during treatment.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>HUS is an illness caused by infection that most often affects the kidneys.</li><li>The infection can be spread to others, so a child with HUS may be isolated while they are treated. </li><li>Treatment may include a special diet and dialysis, a mechanical process that cleans the blood. </li><li>Most children recover completely from HUS once they get treatment.</li></ul><h2>Symptoms of hemolytic uremic syndrome</h2> <h3>Early symptoms</h3> <p>If your child has an E. coli O157 infection, they may throw up, have diarrhea, feel weak or feel sick to their stomach. HUS is not usually diagnosed at this early stage. This is because these symptoms are seen with many causes of infectious diarrhea. </p> <h3>Later symptoms</h3> <p>These are some signs of HUS that appear after several days:</p> <ul> <li>blood in the urine </li> <li>blood in the stool (bowel movement or poo) </li> <li>bruises that are not caused by injuries </li> <li>less urine </li> <li>puffiness around the eyes and ankles </li> <li>paleness </li> <li>higher blood pressure </li> <li>sleepiness </li> <li>irritability </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=29&language=English">headaches</a> </li> <li>seizures </li> </ul> <p>The doctor will take blood samples to find out if your child has HUS.</p><h2>Cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome</h2> <h3>HUS most commonly follows an infection of the intestines</h3> <p>HUS is usually caused by a bacteria called E. coli O157:H7. Healthy people have several types of E. coli living in their intestines. E. coli O157:H7 is a different strain that can be very harmful. It can come from contaminated food, drink, or another source, including other people who are sick with the infection. Undercooked hamburger is one common source, so HUS is also called Hamburger Disease. </p> <p>Most people who swallow this bacteria will get gastroenteritis. <a href="/article?contentid=907&language=English">Gastroenteritis</a> causes <a href="/article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a>, cramps and <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> (throwing up). Anybody can get E. coli O157:H7 gastroenteritis, but it is most serious in children and elderly people. About one in 10 children who have E. coli O157:H7 gastroenteritis will go on to develop HUS. </p> <h3>Some forms of HUS are not associated with diarrhea</h3> <p>Another form of HUS is known as atypical HUS or D- HUS (diarrhea-negative HUS). This is a more serious illness that is sometimes caused by inherited disorders. It may have a different course than diarrhea-associated HUS. </p><h2>How hemolytic uremic syndrome is treated in the hospital</h2> <h3>Your child might need to be isolated for a while</h3> <p>HUS is started by an infection. It is possible for a child with HUS to give the E. coli O157 bacteria to someone else, who would then be at risk for developing HUS as well. For this reason, all children with HUS are kept by themselves (isolated) until several stool samples are negative for the bacteria. </p> <p>Children with HUS may be in a single room or with other children who have HUS. They can only have a limited number of visitors at any one time. Visitors will need to check in at the nursing station. Your child's nurse will explain to you the rules of isolation. </p> <p>Here are things that you can do to make sure HUS is not passed on to others:</p><ul> <li><a href="/article?contentid=1981&language=English">Wash your hands</a> very well before and after you touch your child. </li> <li>Do not eat or drink anything in your child's room. </li> <li>Watch for symptoms of HUS in other family members. </li> <li>Tell the nurse or doctor right away if you or others get HUS symptoms. </li> <li>Visitors who want to see your child must check in at the nursing station. </li> </ul> <h3>Hospital staff will watch your child's blood pressure, blood work, urine and stools</h3> <p>Your child's blood pressure will be checked many times a day. Children with HUS often have high blood pressure and need medicine to lower it. High blood pressure must be treated, because it can harm the kidneys and cause other problems. </p> <p>Blood tests will be done several times a day. These tests show how the disease is progressing and help doctors decide on medicines and other treatments for your child. </p> <p>Children with HUS often have low hemoglobin because their red blood cells are being broken down. Hemoglobin is the substance that carries oxygen around your child's body. If your child has low hemoglobin, they may need a blood transfusion. This means your child will be given blood to keep their hemoglobin from falling too low, which can cause a strain on the heart. The blood comes from a blood donor. </p> <p>Samples of urine and stools will be taken to check for blood, bacteria or viruses.</p> <h3>The nurse will record how much fluid your child takes in</h3> <p>Your child may get fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube. This is a small tube put in a vein in the arm. It is used to give liquids or medicine to your child.</p> <p>The nurse will write down how much fluid your child drinks and how much they get as IV fluids. The nurse will also write down how much fluid your child gets rid of in urine, diarrhea or vomit. Always tell your child's nurse: </p> <ul> <li>when your child eats or drinks </li> <li>when your child goes to the bathroom </li> <li>when your child throws up </li> </ul> <p>Because your child's kidneys are not working well, the doctor might limit how much fluid your child can have. You will be told how much they are allowed to drink. You must be careful to record exactly how much they drink. Do not give them more fluid than they are allowed. </p> <p>For more information, please read <a href="/Article?contentid=1200&language=English">Restricting fluids</a>.</p> <h3>Your child may need a special diet</h3> <p>Children with HUS often need a special diet. The most common diet for HUS has no added salt, low potassium, low phosphorus and low protein. </p> <p>At first, your child will not want to eat very much. Your child may need to be fed by IV until they can eat enough by mouth, because the body needs good nutrition to get better. </p> <p>When your child wants to eat by mouth, a dietitian will help plan your child's menu. They will tell you which foods your child can and cannot eat. Make sure your child follows the special diet. </p> <h3>Your child may need dialysis</h3> <p>Dialysis is a common treatment for HUS. A dialysis machine removes water and chemical wastes from the blood and returns clean blood to the body. Dialysis takes over most of the work of the kidneys while the kidneys are getting better. Usually dialysis is started soon after diagnosis. It can go on for two to three weeks or even longer. </p> <p>There are two main types of dialysis: hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. If your child needs dialysis, you will be given more information at that time. Your child's doctor will tell you which type of dialysis is right for them. </p> <p>For more information, please read <a href="/Article?contentid=44&language=English">Dialysis</a>.</p>
Syndrome hémolytique et urémique (SHU) associé à la diarrhéeSSyndrome hémolytique et urémique (SHU) associé à la diarrhéeDiarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS)FrenchNephrologyBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)KidneysKidneysConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-12-29T05:00:00ZRose Nemec, RN;Keturah Tomlin, RN;Elizabeth Harvey, MD, FRCPC7.0000000000000069.00000000000001335.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Le syndrome hémolytique et urémique (SHU) est une maladie qui affecte les reins et d’autres organes. Cette page explique ce qu’est le SHU, ses effets sur votre enfant et ce à quoi vous devez vous attendre pendant le traitement.</p><h2>Qu’est ce que le syndrome hémolytique et urémique?</h2> <p>Le syndrome hémolytique et urémique (SHU) est une maladie qui touche les reins et d’autres organes. </p> <p>« Hémolytique » signifie la « séparation du sang ». « Urémique » signifie qu’il y a « de l’urée dans le sang » (l’urée est un déchet). Le SHU est donc un état qui fait en sorte que le sang se sépare et que les déchets s’accumulent dans le sang. Le SHU est très grave, mais avec les soins qui conviennent, la plupart des enfants se rétablissent complètement. </p> <p>Cette page explique ce qu’est le SHU, la façon dont il affecte votre enfant et ce à quoi vous devez vous attendre pendant le traitement.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Le SHU est une maladie causée par une infection qui, la plupart du temps, affecte les reins.</li> <li>L’infection peut être transmise à d’autres personnes et, par conséquent, l’enfant atteint du SHU doit être isolé pendant son traitement.</li> <li>Le traitement peut comprendre un régime particulier et de la dialyse, soit un processus mécanique qui nettoie le sang.</li> <li>La plupart des enfants se rétablissent complètement du SHU après avoir reçu un traitement. </li> </ul><h2>Symptômes du SHU</h2> <h3>Les premiers symptômes</h3> <p>Si votre enfant souffre d’une infection E. coli O157, il se peut qu’il vomisse, qu’il ait la diarrhée, qu’il se sente faible ou qu’il ait des maux d’estomac. Le SHU n’est habituellement pas diagnostiqué à cette étape, puisque ces symptômes sont observés dans le cas d’un grand nombre de causes de diarrhée infectieuse.</p> <h3>Les symptômes qui se produisent par la suite</h3> <p>Les symptômes sont des signes du SHU qui se produisent après plusieurs jours, dont les suivants :</p> <ul> <li>du sang dans l’urine;</li> <li>du sang dans les selles (le caca);</li> <li>des bleus qui ne sont pas causés par des blessures;</li> <li>moins d’urine;</li> <li>des bouffissures autour des yeux et des chevilles;</li> <li>une pâleur;</li> <li>une pression artérielle élevée;</li> <li>de la somnolence;</li> <li>de l’irritabilité;</li> <li>des <a href="/Article?contentid=29&language=French">maux de tête</a>;</li> <li>des crises d’épilepsie. </li> </ul> <p>Le médecin prendra des échantillons de sang pour savoir si votre enfant est atteint du SHU.</p><h3>La plupart du temps, le SHU se produit après une infection des intestins</h3> <p>Le SHU est habituellement causé par une bactérie appelée E. coli O157:H7. Les personnes en santé ont plusieurs types d’E. coli qui vivent dans leurs intestins. E. coli O157:H7 est une souche différente qui peut s’avérer très dangereuse. Cette bactérie peut provenir d’aliments ou de boissons contaminés, ou d’une autre source, y compris d’une autre personne infectée. La viande hachée qui n’est pas suffisamment cuite est une source commune et le SHU est également appelé la maladie du hamburger.</p> <p>La plupart des gens qui avalent cette bactérie auront une gastroentérite. La <a href="/Article?contentid=907&language=French">gastroentérite </a>cause de la <a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=French">diarrhée</a>, des crampes et des <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=French">vomissements</a>. N’importe qui peut attraper la gastroentérite E. coli O157:H7, mais cela est plus grave pour les enfants et les personnes âgées. Environ un enfant sur 10 qui a la gastroentérite E. coli O157:H7 développera le SHU.</p> <h3>Certaines formes de SHU n’ont aucun lien avec la diarrhée<br></h3> <p>Le SHU atypique ou SHU D- (SHU sans diarrhée) est une autre forme de SHU. Il s’agit d’une maladie plus grave qui est parfois causée par des troubles héréditaires. Elle pourrait se manifester d’une autre façon que la SHU associée à la diarrhée.</p><h2>Le traitement du SHU à l’hôpital</h2> <h3>Il se peut que votre enfant soit isolé pendant un certain temps</h3> <p>Le SHU commence par une infection, Il est possible qu’un enfant atteint du SHU transmette la bactérie E. coli O157 à une autre personne qui, par conséquent, risquerait aussi de développer le SHU. Pour cette raison, tous les enfants atteints du SHU sont seuls dans leur chambre (isolés) jusqu’à ce que plusieurs analyses des selles se soient avérées négatives en ce qui concerne la bactérie.</p> <p>Les enfants atteints du SHU peuvent être placés seuls dans une chambre ou avec d’autres enfants qui sont également atteints du SHU. Le nombre de visiteurs est limité en tout temps. Les visiteurs devront annoncer leur présence au poste des soins infirmiers. L’infirmière de votre enfant vous expliquera les règles de l’isolement.</p> <p>Voici des conseils pour vous assurer d’éviter la transmission du SHU à d’autres personnes.</p><ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=1981&language=French">Lavez</a> soigneusement vos mains avant de toucher votre enfant et après l’avoir touché.</li> <li>Ne pas manger ou boire dans la chambre de votre enfant.</li> <li>Observer les autres membres de la famille pour déceler des symptômes du SHU.</li> <li>Avisez l’infirmière ou le médecin sur le champ si vous ou d’autres personnes avez des symptômes du SHU.</li> <li>Les visiteurs qui veulent voir le patient doivent s’annoncer au poste des soins infirmiers.</li> </ul> <h3>Le personnel de l’hôpital surveillera la pression artérielle, les analyses sanguines, l’urine et les selles de votre enfant</h3> <p>La pression artérielle sera vérifiée plusieurs fois par jour. Les enfants atteints du SHU ont souvent une pression artérielle élevée et doivent prendre des médicaments pour la réduire. La pression artérielle élevée doit être traitée puisque cela peut endommager les reins et causer d’autres problèmes.</p> <p>Des analyses sanguines seront effectuées plusieurs fois par jour. Ces tests montrent la progression de la maladie et aide les médecins à prendre une décision au sujet des médicaments et d’autres traitements qui conviennent à votre enfant.</p> <p>Les enfants atteints du SHU ont souvent un faible taux d’hémoglobine parce que leurs globules rouges se séparent. L’hémoglobine est la substance qui transporte l’oxygène dans le corps de votre enfant. Si votre enfant à un faible taux d’hémoglobine, il pourrait avoir besoin d’une transfusion sanguine. Cela signifie qu'il recevra du sang pour empêcher une chute trop importante d’hémoglobine, ce qui pourrait causer une pression sur le cœur. Le sang provient d’un donneur.</p> <p>Des échantillons de l’urine et des selles seront prélevés afin de détecter la présence de sang, de bactéries ou d’un virus.</p> <h3>L’infirmière tiendra compte de la quantité de fluides que votre enfant prend</h3> <p>Votre enfant pourrait recevoir des fluides par un tube intraveineux (i.v.) Il s’agit d’un petit tube inséré dans une veine du bras. Il sert à donner des liquides ou des médicaments à votre enfant.</p> <p>L’infirmière prendra en note la quantité de liquide que votre enfant bois et la quantité qu’il obtient par l’i.v. Elle prendra également en note la quantité de liquide que votre enfant élimine dans l’urine, la diarrhée ou le vomit. Il faut toujours préciser les points suivants à l’infirmière de votre enfant :</p> <ul> <li>lorsque votre enfant mange ou boit;</li> <li>lorsque votre enfant va à la toilette;</li> <li>lorsque votre enfant vomit.</li> </ul> <p>Puisque les reins de votre enfant ne fonctionnent pas bien, le médecin pourrait limiter la quantité de liquide qu’il peut boire. On vous précisera cette quantité. Vous devez vous assurer de connaître la quantité exacte qu’il boit. Ne lui donnez pas une quantité qui dépasse celle permise. </p> <p>Pour obtenir d’autres renseignements, veuillez lire la section intitulée <a href="/Article?contentid=1200&language=French">« Restriction de liquides ».</a>.</p> <h3>Il se pourrait que votre enfant ait besoin d’un régime particulier</h3> <p>Les enfants atteints du SHU ont souvent besoin de suivre un régime particulier. Le régime le plus commun pour le SHU ne comporte aucun sel ajouté et est faible en potassium, en phosphore et en protéines. </p> <p>Au début, votre enfant ne voudra pas manger beaucoup. Il pourrait devoir être nourri par i.v. jusqu’à ce qu’il puisse manger suffisamment d’aliments par la bouche, puisque le corps a besoin d’une bonne alimentation pour se rétablir.</p> <p>Lorsque votre enfant voudra manger par la bouche, une diététiste vous aidera à planifier le menu de votre enfant. Elle vous précisera les aliments que votre enfant peut manger et ceux qu’il ne doit pas manger. Assurez vous que votre enfant suit le régime particulier.</p> <h3>Votre enfant pourrait avoir besoin de dialyse</h3> <p>La dialyse est un traitement commun contre le SHU. Un appareil de dialyse retire l’eau et les déchets chimiques du sang et retourne le sang propre dans le corps. La dialyse fait la majeure partie du travail des reins, pendant que les reins prennent du mieux. Habituellement, la dialyse commence tôt après le diagnostic. Elle peut durer de deux à trois semaines, voire plus longtemps. </p> <p>Il existe deux types de dialyse : l’hémodialyse et la dialyse péritonéale. Si votre enfant a besoin de dialyse, vous recevrez de l’information à ce moment. Le médecin de votre enfant vous précisera le type de dialyse qui convient à votre enfant.</p> <p>Pour obtenir d’autres renseignements, veuillez consulter la section intitulée <a href="/Article?contentid=44&language=French">« Dialyse ».</a>.</p>

 

 

Diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS)934.000000000000Diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS)Diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS)DEnglishNephrologyBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)KidneysKidneysConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-12-29T05:00:00ZRose Nemec, RN;Keturah Tomlin, RN;Elizabeth Harvey, MD, FRCPC7.0000000000000069.00000000000001335.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a disease that affects the kidneys and other organs. This page explains what HUS is, how it affects your child, and what to expect during treatment.</p><h2>What is hemolytic uremic syndrome?</h2> <p>Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a disease that affects the kidneys and other organs. </p> <p>"Hemolytic" means "blood breakdown." "Uremic" means "urea in the blood" (urea is a waste product). So HUS is a condition where the blood breaks down and waste products build up in the blood. HUS is very serious, but with proper care most children recover completely. </p> <p>This page explains what HUS is, how it affects your child, and what to expect during treatment.</p><h2>How hemolytic uremic syndrome affects the body</h2><p>HUS most often affects the kidneys, the blood and the brain.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Urinary system</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/HUS_urinary_female_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Location of ribcage, kidney, vein, artery, ureter and bladder in a child" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The kidneys filter out excess water and chemical waste products from the blood and turn them into urine. The urine then travels down the ureters to the bladder and flows out of the body.</figcaption> </figure> <h3>The kidneys</h3><p>Most people are born with two kidneys. The kidneys take excess water and chemical waste products out of the blood and turn them into urine (pee). The urine then flows out of the body.</p><p>When a child has HUS, the kidneys cannot clean the blood properly or make the normal amount of urine. Extra fluid and chemical wastes build up in the body. This can cause several problems:<br></p><ul><li>If fluid builds up in the blood vessels, your child's blood pressure will rise.</li><li>If fluid builds up in the soft tissues, your child will have puffiness and swelling.</li><li>If fluid builds up in the lungs, your child will have trouble breathing.</li><li>If the waste product <a href="/Article?contentid=220&language=English">potassium</a> builds up in the blood, it may cause an irregular heartbeat or even stop the heart from beating.</li><li>If the waste product urea builds up in the blood, it may make your child sleepy or irritable (cranky). It may also make your child's breath smell bad.</li></ul><p>If HUS progresses, the kidneys can stop working, and you may see changes in how your child behaves. For example, they may urinate less and be less hungry.</p><h3>The blood</h3><p>Our blood contains three different types of cells:</p><ul><li>Red blood cells carry oxygen around the body to all our tissues and organs.</li><li>White blood cells help fight infection.</li><li>Platelets are "sticky cells" that help the blood to clot.</li></ul><p>As the blood flows through inflamed blood vessels, the red blood cells and platelets may be broken down.</p><ul><li>A low platelet count can be associated with bruising and easy bleeding. Nosebleeds or bleeding from the gums are common signs of a low platelet count.</li><li>A low red blood cell count is called <a href="/article?contentid=841&language=English">anemia</a>. Children with anemia may look pale and feel tired.</li></ul><h3>The brain</h3><p>HUS may increase blood pressure and affect the blood vessels in the brain. This can make your child cranky, tired and more demanding. In severe cases, your child can have seizures, where they cannot control their movement and may lose consciousness. Seizures can be controlled with medicine. They usually disappear when a child recovers from HUS.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>HUS is an illness caused by infection that most often affects the kidneys.</li><li>The infection can be spread to others, so a child with HUS may be isolated while they are treated. </li><li>Treatment may include a special diet and dialysis, a mechanical process that cleans the blood. </li><li>Most children recover completely from HUS once they get treatment.</li></ul><h2>Symptoms of hemolytic uremic syndrome</h2> <h3>Early symptoms</h3> <p>If your child has an E. coli O157 infection, they may throw up, have diarrhea, feel weak or feel sick to their stomach. HUS is not usually diagnosed at this early stage. This is because these symptoms are seen with many causes of infectious diarrhea. </p> <h3>Later symptoms</h3> <p>These are some signs of HUS that appear after several days:</p> <ul> <li>blood in the urine </li> <li>blood in the stool (bowel movement or poo) </li> <li>bruises that are not caused by injuries </li> <li>less urine </li> <li>puffiness around the eyes and ankles </li> <li>paleness </li> <li>higher blood pressure </li> <li>sleepiness </li> <li>irritability </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=29&language=English">headaches</a> </li> <li>seizures </li> </ul> <p>The doctor will take blood samples to find out if your child has HUS.</p><h2>Cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome</h2> <h3>HUS most commonly follows an infection of the intestines</h3> <p>HUS is usually caused by a bacteria called E. coli O157:H7. Healthy people have several types of E. coli living in their intestines. E. coli O157:H7 is a different strain that can be very harmful. It can come from contaminated food, drink, or another source, including other people who are sick with the infection. Undercooked hamburger is one common source, so HUS is also called Hamburger Disease. </p> <p>Most people who swallow this bacteria will get gastroenteritis. <a href="/article?contentid=907&language=English">Gastroenteritis</a> causes <a href="/article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a>, cramps and <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> (throwing up). Anybody can get E. coli O157:H7 gastroenteritis, but it is most serious in children and elderly people. About one in 10 children who have E. coli O157:H7 gastroenteritis will go on to develop HUS. </p> <h3>Some forms of HUS are not associated with diarrhea</h3> <p>Another form of HUS is known as atypical HUS or D- HUS (diarrhea-negative HUS). This is a more serious illness that is sometimes caused by inherited disorders. It may have a different course than diarrhea-associated HUS. </p><h2>How hemolytic uremic syndrome is treated in the hospital</h2> <h3>Your child might need to be isolated for a while</h3> <p>HUS is started by an infection. It is possible for a child with HUS to give the E. coli O157 bacteria to someone else, who would then be at risk for developing HUS as well. For this reason, all children with HUS are kept by themselves (isolated) until several stool samples are negative for the bacteria. </p> <p>Children with HUS may be in a single room or with other children who have HUS. They can only have a limited number of visitors at any one time. Visitors will need to check in at the nursing station. Your child's nurse will explain to you the rules of isolation. </p> <p>Here are things that you can do to make sure HUS is not passed on to others:</p><ul> <li><a href="/article?contentid=1981&language=English">Wash your hands</a> very well before and after you touch your child. </li> <li>Do not eat or drink anything in your child's room. </li> <li>Watch for symptoms of HUS in other family members. </li> <li>Tell the nurse or doctor right away if you or others get HUS symptoms. </li> <li>Visitors who want to see your child must check in at the nursing station. </li> </ul> <h3>Hospital staff will watch your child's blood pressure, blood work, urine and stools</h3> <p>Your child's blood pressure will be checked many times a day. Children with HUS often have high blood pressure and need medicine to lower it. High blood pressure must be treated, because it can harm the kidneys and cause other problems. </p> <p>Blood tests will be done several times a day. These tests show how the disease is progressing and help doctors decide on medicines and other treatments for your child. </p> <p>Children with HUS often have low hemoglobin because their red blood cells are being broken down. Hemoglobin is the substance that carries oxygen around your child's body. If your child has low hemoglobin, they may need a blood transfusion. This means your child will be given blood to keep their hemoglobin from falling too low, which can cause a strain on the heart. The blood comes from a blood donor. </p> <p>Samples of urine and stools will be taken to check for blood, bacteria or viruses.</p> <h3>The nurse will record how much fluid your child takes in</h3> <p>Your child may get fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube. This is a small tube put in a vein in the arm. It is used to give liquids or medicine to your child.</p> <p>The nurse will write down how much fluid your child drinks and how much they get as IV fluids. The nurse will also write down how much fluid your child gets rid of in urine, diarrhea or vomit. Always tell your child's nurse: </p> <ul> <li>when your child eats or drinks </li> <li>when your child goes to the bathroom </li> <li>when your child throws up </li> </ul> <p>Because your child's kidneys are not working well, the doctor might limit how much fluid your child can have. You will be told how much they are allowed to drink. You must be careful to record exactly how much they drink. Do not give them more fluid than they are allowed. </p> <p>For more information, please read <a href="/Article?contentid=1200&language=English">Restricting fluids</a>.</p> <h3>Your child may need a special diet</h3> <p>Children with HUS often need a special diet. The most common diet for HUS has no added salt, low potassium, low phosphorus and low protein. </p> <p>At first, your child will not want to eat very much. Your child may need to be fed by IV until they can eat enough by mouth, because the body needs good nutrition to get better. </p> <p>When your child wants to eat by mouth, a dietitian will help plan your child's menu. They will tell you which foods your child can and cannot eat. Make sure your child follows the special diet. </p> <h3>Your child may need dialysis</h3> <p>Dialysis is a common treatment for HUS. A dialysis machine removes water and chemical wastes from the blood and returns clean blood to the body. Dialysis takes over most of the work of the kidneys while the kidneys are getting better. Usually dialysis is started soon after diagnosis. It can go on for two to three weeks or even longer. </p> <p>There are two main types of dialysis: hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. If your child needs dialysis, you will be given more information at that time. Your child's doctor will tell you which type of dialysis is right for them. </p> <p>For more information, please read <a href="/Article?contentid=44&language=English">Dialysis</a>.</p><h2>Outcome: going home</h2> <p>Most children recover completely from HUS. How long your child stays in hospital will depend on the symptoms, how they respond to treatment and how quickly their kidney function improves. You will still need to visit your hospital's nephrology clinic regularly so that your child's progress can be checked. </p> <p>If you have questions, please talk about them with your child's nurse or doctor.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/HUS_urinary_female_MED_ILL_EN.jpgDiarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS)False

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