Slipped capital femoral epiphysisSSlipped capital femoral epiphysisSlipped capital femoral epiphysisEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years)HipBonesConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-12-29T05:00:00ZJanet Ahier, RN, BScN, MN, APN;Unni Narayanan, MB, BS, FRCSC;Bruna Villella, RN7.0000000000000070.00000000000001615.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Slipped capital femoral epiphysis happens when the epiphysis bone slips off the growth plate into an incorrect position. Learn what to expect before, during and after the operation. </p><h2>What is the capital femoral epiphysis?</h2><p>The capital femoral epiphysis is the head (top end) of the thigh bone. "Capital" means "head". "Femoral" refers to the femur (thigh bone). An epiphysis is the end of a long bone. In children and teens who are still growing, the epiphysis is separated from the main part of the bone by a flat piece of cartilage, called the growth plate. When the bone stops growing, the cartilage in the growth plate is replaced by bone. </p><p>For more information, please see <a href="https://pie.med.utoronto.ca/htbw/module.html?module=skeleton-child">How Bones Grow</a> in How the Body Works: Skeleton.</p><h2>What is a slipped capital femoral epiphysis?</h2><p>Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) occurs when the capital femoral epiphysis slips down and backward in relation to the neck of the femur. Another way to describe SCFE is like a scoop of ice cream slipping off the top of a cone. This slippage can be either gradual or sudden.</p><p>SCFE is the most common hip disorder in teens.</p><p>A child with SCFE will probably need an operation. This information explains what to expect before, during and after the operation. Share and discuss it with your child so that they know what to expect. </p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Slipped_capital_femoral_epiphysis_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The top end of the femur is called the capital femoral epiphysis. In children and young teens, it is separated from the rest of the bone by a growth plate. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis is when the epiphysis slips off the growth plate into an incorrect position.</figcaption> </figure><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Slipped capital femoral epiphysis happens when the head of the thigh bone slips down and backward relative to the neck of the thigh bone. </li><li>Your child will probably need an operation. The operation will depend on the type of slip.</li><li>After the operation, your child will need to use crutches for six weeks.</li> <li>Call the surgeon if your child has redness, swelling, or green or yellow drainage from the incision; more pain; or pain in the other hip.</li></ul><h2>Symptoms of SCFE</h2> <p>The symptoms of SCFE depend on the type of slip:</p> <ul> <li>If the slip is mild and stable, the person may only experience mild pain in the groin area and a slight limp that increases with activity. They may also experience pain in the lower thigh or knee area, with or without groin pain. </li> <li>With chronic slips, the person may have pain on and off over several months. </li> <li>With acute slips, the person may have immediate pain and walk with a limp or have trouble walking. The person may also walk with the leg turned outward. </li> <li>Unstable slips usually occur when the person has some type of injury that makes the femoral head slip suddenly. The person will not be able to walk or bear any weight on that leg. </li> </ul> <p>Sometimes slips happen on both sides but the person only feels the symptoms on one side. For this reason, it is very important that the doctor checks both hips.</p><h2>We do not know what causes SCFE</h2> <p>The cause of SCFE is unknown. We do know that a person is more likely to develop it if they have one or more of these risk factors:</p> <ul> <li>obesity</li> <li>endocrine problems, such as thyroid issues</li> <li>trauma (injury)</li> <li>certain medicines, such as steroids</li> <li>radiation treatment</li> <li>chemotherapy</li> <li>bone problems related to kidney disease</li> </ul><h2>How SCFE is diagnosed</h2> <p>SCFE is usually diagnosed with an X-ray of both hips.</p> <p>Rarely, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT scans are used to diagnose a very mild slip or "preslip" that cannot be seen on an X-ray. </p><h2>How SCFE is treated</h2> <p>There are two immediate goals of treatment:</p> <ol> <li>to prevent further slippage</li> <li>to prevent damage to the blood circulation to the bone</li> </ol> <p>Your child will probably need surgery (an operation). Your surgeon will talk with you and your child about the best treatment. This will depend on the type of slip: </p> <ul> <li>If the head of the femur has slipped very little (less than 1 cm), it will be surgically fixed (secured) in that position with a single screw through a small incision (cut) in the skin. </li> <li>If the slip is more severe, the surgeon may need to manipulate the hip. They may need to use one or two screws to stabilize it and prevent further slippage.</li> <li>Severe, unstable slips are sometimes treated with a special operation. The surgeon opens the hip joint and puts the head of the femur back into the correct position before securing it. </li> </ul> <h2>Before the operation</h2> <p>Your child will need to stay in hospital for one to five days, depending on the operation. Ask the nurse what to bring with you for your child's stay in hospital.</p> <p>Several hours before the operation, your child will need to stop eating and drinking. The doctor or nurse will tell you when your child must stop eating and drinking. </p> <h3>Write this information down here:</h3> <p>The date and time of your operation:</p> <p>When your child must stop eating:</p> <p>When your child must stop drinking clear fluids:</p> <p>Other things to remember:</p> <h2>Your child will have a general anaesthetic</h2> <p>Just before the operation, your child will be given a special "sleep medicine" called a <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthetic</a>. This makes sure that your child will sleep through the operation and will not feel any pain. </p> <h2>After the operation</h2> <p>The operation will last two to three hours.</p> <p>After the operation, your child will be taken to the recovery room, also called the <a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=English">post-anaesthetic care unit (PACU)</a>. This is where your child will wake up. Your child will stay in the PACU for about one hour or until your child is awake. We will then move your child to a room on the nursing unit. </p> <p>You will be able to see your child when they are fully awake. A staff member from the surgical waiting area will bring you to your child.</p> <p>Your child will get fluids through a tube in their arm, called an intravenous (IV) line, until they are able to drink easily. Your child will have a bandage on their hip and thigh. </p> <p>Your child will stay in hospital for one to five days, depending on the operation.</p> <h3>Managing post-operative pain</h3> <p>At first, your child will receive medicine for pain through the IV. When the pain is under control and your child can drink fluids, they will be given pain medicine by mouth as needed. If your child is in pain, tell the nurse. </p> <h3>Caring for your child after the operation</h3> <p>Your child will have a small or large gauze bandage (depending on the type of operation) on the affected thigh and hip area. Your nurse will check it for bleeding. The bandage will be changed before your child goes home. </p> <p>The nurse will check your child's leg for movement, feeling and blood circulation.</p> <p>The nurse will check your child's temperature, pulse, blood pressure and breathing every hour for the first four hours, and then every four hours until your child goes home. Your child will also be asked to rate their pain, using an age-appropriate pain scale. </p> <p>Starting the first day after surgery, your child will see a physiotherapist to learn <a href="/Article?contentid=1048&language=English">how to use crutches</a>. Your child will need to use crutches for six weeks after the surgery. Your child may have pain when walking and moving. </p> <p>Your child's surgeon will explain how much weight your child can put on the affected leg.</p><h2>When to call the doctor</h2> <p>Call your child's surgeon if your child has any of the following symptoms:</p> <ul> <li>redness, swelling or green or yellow drainage from the incision </li> <li>more pain </li> <li>pain in the other hip </li> </ul> <p>If it is an emergency or if you have any concerns about your child's condition, do not wait. Take your child to the closest emergency department.</p>
Épiphysiolyse fémorale supérieureÉÉpiphysiolyse fémorale supérieureSlipped capital femoral epiphysisFrenchOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years)HipBonesConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-12-29T05:00:00ZJanet Ahier, RN, BScN, MN, APN;Unni Narayanan, MB, BS, FRCSC;Bruna Villella, RN7.0000000000000070.00000000000001615.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Une épiphysiolyse fémorale supérieure se produit lorsque l'épiphyse fémorale glisse en position incorrecte par rapport au cartilage de conjugaison.</p><h2>Qu'est-ce que l'épiphyse fémorale ?</h2> <p>L'épiphyse fémorale désigne la tête (extrémité supérieure) du fémur (os de la cuisse); une épiphyse (prononcer : é pi-fi-ze) désigne l'extrémité d'un os long. Chez les enfants et les adolescents qui sont toujours en croissance, l'épiphyse est séparée de la partie principale de l'os par un morceau plat de cartilage appelé « cartilage de conjugaison ». Lorsque l'os cesse de grandir, le cartilage de conjugaison est remplacé par de l'os.</p> <p>Pour plus de renseignements à ce sujet, veuillez consulter la rubrique « <a href="https://pie.med.utoronto.ca/htbw/module.html?module=skeleton-child">« Croissance des os »</a> sous « Fonctionnement du corps : le squelette ».</p> <h2>Qu'est-ce qu'une épiphysiolyse fémorale supérieure ?</h2> <p>Une épiphysiolyse fémorale supérieure se produit lorsque l'épiphyse fémorale glisse vers le bas et vers l'arrière par rapport au col du fémur – on peut représenter une épiphysiolyse fémorale supérieure comme une boule de crème glacée qui glisse du haut du cornet. Ce glissement peut être graduel ou soudain.</p> <p>L'épiphysiolyse fémorale supérieure est le problème de la hanche le plus courant chez les adolescents.</p> <p>Une enfant avec une épiphysiolyse fémorale supérieure aura probablement besoin d'une opération. Cette rubrique explique ce à quoi s'attendre avant, pendant et après l'opération. Parlez-en à votre enfant pour qu'il sache à quoi s'attendre.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Épiphysiolyse fémorale supérieure</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Slipped_capital_femoral_epiphysis_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">L'extrémité supérieure du fémur se nomme « fémorale supérieure ». Chez les enfants et les jeunes adolescents, elle est séparée du reste de l'os par un cartilage de conjugaison. L'épiphysiolyse fémorale supérieure se produit lorsque l'épiphysiole glisse et se place en position incorrecte.</figcaption> </figure><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Une épiphysiolyse fémorale supérieure se produit lorsque la tête de l'os de la cuisse (fémur) glisse vers le bas et l'arrière par rapport au col du fémur.</li> <li>Votre enfant aura probablement besoin d'une opération. L'opération dépendra du type de glissement.</li> <li>Après l'opération, votre enfant devra utiliser des béquilles pendant 6 semaines.</li> <li>Appelez le chirurgien si votre enfant a des signes de rougeur, d'enflure ou d'écoulement verdâtre ou jaunâtre au lieu de l'incision; si la douleur augmente; ou s'il ressent de la douleur dans l'autre hanche.</li> </ul><h2>Symptômes d'une épiphysiolyse fémorale supérieure</h2> <p>Les symptômes de l'épiphysiolyse fémorale supérieure dépendent du type de glissement :</p> <ul> <li>Si le glissement est léger et stable, la personne peut ne ressentir que peu de douleur au niveau de l'aine et avoir un léger boitillement qui augmente avec l'activité. Elle peut également ressentir de la douleur dans le bas de la cuisse ou dans la région du genou, avec ou sans douleur à l'aine.</li> <li>Dans le cas de glissements chroniques, la personne peut ressentir de la douleur épisodique pendant plusieurs mois.</li> <li>Dans le cas de glissements aigus, la personne peut ressentir une douleur immédiate et marcher en boitant ou avoir du mal à marcher. La personne peut également marcher avec la jambe tournée vers l'intérieure.</li> <li>Des hanches instables se produisent habituellement en cas de blessure qui entraîne un glissement soudain de la tête du fémur. Cette personne ne peut alors pas marcher ou porter de poids sur cette jambe.</li> </ul> <p>Parfois, les glissements se produisent des deux côtés, mais la personne ne ressent des symptômes que d'un côté. C'est pourquoi il est très important que le médecin examine les deux hanches.</p><h2>Nous ne savons pas ce qui cause l'épiphysiolyse fémorale supérieure</h2> <p>La cause de l'épiphysiolyse fémorale supérieure est inconnue. Nous savons par contre qu'une personne est plus à risque si elle présente un ou plusieurs des facteurs suivants :</p> <ul> <li>obésité,</li> <li>problèmes endocriniens, comme des problèmes thyroïdiens,</li> <li>traumatisme (blessure),</li> <li>certain médicaments, comme les stéroïdes,</li> <li>traitement par rayonnement,</li> <li>chimiothérapie,</li> <li>problèmes osseux associés à une maladie de reins.</li> </ul><h2>Diagnostic de l'épiphysiolyse fémorale supérieure</h2> <p>L'épiphysiolyse fémorale supérieure est habituellement diagnostiquée grâce à une radiographie des deux hanches.</p> <p>On utilise rarement l'imagerie par résonnance magnétique (IRM) ou la tomodensitométrie pour diagnostiquer un léger glissement ou un « glissement préliminaire » qui ne peut être décelé sur une radiographie.</p><h2>Traitement de l'épiphysiolyse fémorale supérieure</h2> <p>Il existe 2 objectifs immédiats au traitement :</p> <ol> <li>éviter d'autres glissements,</li> <li>éviter les dommages à la circulation sanguine dans l'os.</li> </ol> <p>Votre enfant aura probablement besoin d'une chirurgie (une opération). Votre chirurgien discutera avec vous et votre enfant du traitement le plus adapté. Cela dépend du type de glissement : </p> <ul> <li>Si la tête du fémur n'a que très peu glissé (moins de 1 cm), lors de la chirurgie, elle sera fixée en position à l'aide d'une seule vis par une très petite incision (coupure) dans la peau.</li> <li>Si le glissement est plus important, le chirurgien devra peut-être manipuler la hanche. Il devra peut-être utiliser 1 ou 2 vis pour stabiliser la hanche et éviter d'autres glissements.</li> <li>Les hanches très instables et qui présentent de graves glissements sont parfois traitées grâce à une opération spéciale. Le chirurgien doit ouvrir l'articulation de la hanche et replacer la tête du fémur à sa position correcte avant de la fixer.</li> </ul> <h2>Avant l'opération</h2> <p>Votre enfant devra rester à l'hôpital de 1 à 5 jours, selon le type d'opération. Demandez à l'infirmière quoi apporter pour le séjour de votre enfant à l'hôpital.</p> <p>Plusieurs heures avant l'opération, votre enfant devra arrêter de manger et de boire. Le médecin ou l'infirmière vous indiquera quand votre enfant devra arrêter de manger et de boire. </p> <h3>Inscrivez les renseignements suivants ici :</h3> <p>La date et l'heure de l'opération :</p> <p>Le moment où votre enfant doit arrêter de manger :</p> <p>Le moment où votre enfant doit arrêter de boire des liquides clairs :</p> <p>Autres points à retenir :</p> <p></p> <h2>Votre enfant recevra une anesthésie générale</h2> <p>Juste avant l'opération, votre enfant recevra un « médicament pour dormir » appelé une <a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=French">anesthésie générale</a>. Cela permet de nous assurer que votre enfant dormira pendant l'opération et qu'il ne ressentira aucune douleur. </p> <h2>Après l'opération</h2> <p>L'opération durera de 2 à 3 heures.</p> <p>Après l'opération, votre enfant sera conduit à la salle de réveil, aussi appelée l'<a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=French">unité de soins post-anesthésie</a>. C'est là que votre enfant reprendra conscience. Il y restera environ 1 heure ou le temps qu'il se réveille. Il sera ensuite conduit dans une chambre de l'unité de soins.</p> <p>Vous pourrez voir votre enfant une fois qu'il sera entièrement réveillé. Un membre du personnel de la salle d'attente pour les chirurgies vous conduira vers lui.</p> <p>Votre enfant recevra des liquides par un tube inséré sans son bras et appelé une intraveineuse (IV) jusqu'à ce qu'il puisse boire facilement. Votre enfant aura un pansement sur sa hanche et sur sa cuisse.</p> <p>Votre enfant restera à l'hôpital de 1 à 5 jours, selon l'opération.</p> <h3>Gérer la douleur après l'opération</h3> <p>Au début, votre enfant recevra des médicaments contre la douleur par IV. Une fois la douleur contrôlée et lorsque votre enfant pourra boire, il recevra au besoin des médicaments contre la douleur par la bouche. Si votre enfant souffre, dites-le à l'infirmière.</p> <h3>Prendre soin de votre enfant après l'opération</h3> <p>Votre enfant aura un petit ou un gros pansement (selon le type d'opération) sur la zone de la cuisse et de la hanche. Votre infirmière vérifiera s'il y a des saignements. Le pansement sera changé avant que votre enfant rentre à la maison.</p> <p>L'infirmière examinera la jambe de votre enfant pour vérifier son mouvement, ses sensations et la circulation sanguine.</p> <p>L'infirmière prendra la température de votre enfant, son pouls, sa pression sanguine et sa respiration toutes les heures pendant les premières 4 heures, puis toutes les 4 heures jusqu'à ce que votre enfant rentre à la maison. Votre enfant devra aussi évaluer sa douleur à l'aide d'une échelle adaptée à son âge.</p> <p>Dès le premier jour après la chirurgie, votre enfant consultera un physiothérapeute pour apprendre à <a href="/Article?contentid=1048&language=French">utiliser des béquilles</a>. Il devra les utiliser pendant 6 semaines après l'opération. Il ressentira peut-être de la douleur lorsqu'il marchera ou qu'il se déplacera.</p> <p>Le chirurgien qui a opéré votre enfant vous indiquera le poids que votre enfant peut appliquer sur la jambe opérée.</p><h2>Quand appeler le médecin ?</h2> <p>Appelez le chirurgien de votre enfant s'il montre un des symptômes suivants :</p> <ul> <li>rougeur, enflure ou écoulement verdâtre ou jaunâtre au niveau de l'incision,</li> <li>une douleur qui augmente,</li> <li>de la douleur dans l'autre hanche. </li> </ul> <p>En cas d'urgence ou si l'état de votre enfant vous inquiète, n'attendez pas. Conduisez votre enfant à l'urgence la plus près.</p>

 

 

Slipped capital femoral epiphysis941.000000000000Slipped capital femoral epiphysisSlipped capital femoral epiphysisSEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years)HipBonesConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-12-29T05:00:00ZJanet Ahier, RN, BScN, MN, APN;Unni Narayanan, MB, BS, FRCSC;Bruna Villella, RN7.0000000000000070.00000000000001615.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Slipped capital femoral epiphysis happens when the epiphysis bone slips off the growth plate into an incorrect position. Learn what to expect before, during and after the operation. </p><h2>What is the capital femoral epiphysis?</h2><p>The capital femoral epiphysis is the head (top end) of the thigh bone. "Capital" means "head". "Femoral" refers to the femur (thigh bone). An epiphysis is the end of a long bone. In children and teens who are still growing, the epiphysis is separated from the main part of the bone by a flat piece of cartilage, called the growth plate. When the bone stops growing, the cartilage in the growth plate is replaced by bone. </p><p>For more information, please see <a href="https://pie.med.utoronto.ca/htbw/module.html?module=skeleton-child">How Bones Grow</a> in How the Body Works: Skeleton.</p><h2>What is a slipped capital femoral epiphysis?</h2><p>Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) occurs when the capital femoral epiphysis slips down and backward in relation to the neck of the femur. Another way to describe SCFE is like a scoop of ice cream slipping off the top of a cone. This slippage can be either gradual or sudden.</p><p>SCFE is the most common hip disorder in teens.</p><p>A child with SCFE will probably need an operation. This information explains what to expect before, during and after the operation. Share and discuss it with your child so that they know what to expect. </p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Slipped_capital_femoral_epiphysis_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The top end of the femur is called the capital femoral epiphysis. In children and young teens, it is separated from the rest of the bone by a growth plate. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis is when the epiphysis slips off the growth plate into an incorrect position.</figcaption> </figure><h2>SCFE is classified in two ways</h2> <p>The first way to classify SCFE is by how long the person has had symptoms:</p> <ul> <li>Acute: symptoms began suddenly (less than three weeks ago). </li> <li>Chronic: the person has had symptoms for more than three weeks, sometimes for years. </li> </ul> <p>The second way is by the stability of the slip:</p> <ul> <li>Stable slip: The person can usually walk, at least with crutches. </li> <li>Unstable slip: This is like a fracture. It is so painful that the person cannot walk at all. </li> </ul><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Slipped capital femoral epiphysis happens when the head of the thigh bone slips down and backward relative to the neck of the thigh bone. </li><li>Your child will probably need an operation. The operation will depend on the type of slip.</li><li>After the operation, your child will need to use crutches for six weeks.</li> <li>Call the surgeon if your child has redness, swelling, or green or yellow drainage from the incision; more pain; or pain in the other hip.</li></ul><h2>Symptoms of SCFE</h2> <p>The symptoms of SCFE depend on the type of slip:</p> <ul> <li>If the slip is mild and stable, the person may only experience mild pain in the groin area and a slight limp that increases with activity. They may also experience pain in the lower thigh or knee area, with or without groin pain. </li> <li>With chronic slips, the person may have pain on and off over several months. </li> <li>With acute slips, the person may have immediate pain and walk with a limp or have trouble walking. The person may also walk with the leg turned outward. </li> <li>Unstable slips usually occur when the person has some type of injury that makes the femoral head slip suddenly. The person will not be able to walk or bear any weight on that leg. </li> </ul> <p>Sometimes slips happen on both sides but the person only feels the symptoms on one side. For this reason, it is very important that the doctor checks both hips.</p><h2>We do not know what causes SCFE</h2> <p>The cause of SCFE is unknown. We do know that a person is more likely to develop it if they have one or more of these risk factors:</p> <ul> <li>obesity</li> <li>endocrine problems, such as thyroid issues</li> <li>trauma (injury)</li> <li>certain medicines, such as steroids</li> <li>radiation treatment</li> <li>chemotherapy</li> <li>bone problems related to kidney disease</li> </ul><h2>How SCFE is diagnosed</h2> <p>SCFE is usually diagnosed with an X-ray of both hips.</p> <p>Rarely, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT scans are used to diagnose a very mild slip or "preslip" that cannot be seen on an X-ray. </p><h2>How SCFE is treated</h2> <p>There are two immediate goals of treatment:</p> <ol> <li>to prevent further slippage</li> <li>to prevent damage to the blood circulation to the bone</li> </ol> <p>Your child will probably need surgery (an operation). Your surgeon will talk with you and your child about the best treatment. This will depend on the type of slip: </p> <ul> <li>If the head of the femur has slipped very little (less than 1 cm), it will be surgically fixed (secured) in that position with a single screw through a small incision (cut) in the skin. </li> <li>If the slip is more severe, the surgeon may need to manipulate the hip. They may need to use one or two screws to stabilize it and prevent further slippage.</li> <li>Severe, unstable slips are sometimes treated with a special operation. The surgeon opens the hip joint and puts the head of the femur back into the correct position before securing it. </li> </ul> <h2>Before the operation</h2> <p>Your child will need to stay in hospital for one to five days, depending on the operation. Ask the nurse what to bring with you for your child's stay in hospital.</p> <p>Several hours before the operation, your child will need to stop eating and drinking. The doctor or nurse will tell you when your child must stop eating and drinking. </p> <h3>Write this information down here:</h3> <p>The date and time of your operation:</p> <p>When your child must stop eating:</p> <p>When your child must stop drinking clear fluids:</p> <p>Other things to remember:</p> <h2>Your child will have a general anaesthetic</h2> <p>Just before the operation, your child will be given a special "sleep medicine" called a <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthetic</a>. This makes sure that your child will sleep through the operation and will not feel any pain. </p> <h2>After the operation</h2> <p>The operation will last two to three hours.</p> <p>After the operation, your child will be taken to the recovery room, also called the <a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=English">post-anaesthetic care unit (PACU)</a>. This is where your child will wake up. Your child will stay in the PACU for about one hour or until your child is awake. We will then move your child to a room on the nursing unit. </p> <p>You will be able to see your child when they are fully awake. A staff member from the surgical waiting area will bring you to your child.</p> <p>Your child will get fluids through a tube in their arm, called an intravenous (IV) line, until they are able to drink easily. Your child will have a bandage on their hip and thigh. </p> <p>Your child will stay in hospital for one to five days, depending on the operation.</p> <h3>Managing post-operative pain</h3> <p>At first, your child will receive medicine for pain through the IV. When the pain is under control and your child can drink fluids, they will be given pain medicine by mouth as needed. If your child is in pain, tell the nurse. </p> <h3>Caring for your child after the operation</h3> <p>Your child will have a small or large gauze bandage (depending on the type of operation) on the affected thigh and hip area. Your nurse will check it for bleeding. The bandage will be changed before your child goes home. </p> <p>The nurse will check your child's leg for movement, feeling and blood circulation.</p> <p>The nurse will check your child's temperature, pulse, blood pressure and breathing every hour for the first four hours, and then every four hours until your child goes home. Your child will also be asked to rate their pain, using an age-appropriate pain scale. </p> <p>Starting the first day after surgery, your child will see a physiotherapist to learn <a href="/Article?contentid=1048&language=English">how to use crutches</a>. Your child will need to use crutches for six weeks after the surgery. Your child may have pain when walking and moving. </p> <p>Your child's surgeon will explain how much weight your child can put on the affected leg.</p><h2>How to take care of your child at home</h2> <p>Your child will go home with a band-aid or a gauze dressing. Your child will need to take sponge baths instead of regular baths or showers until this dressing is removed. </p> <p>You can take the dressing off three to five days after the date of surgery. When the dressing is off, your child can take showers.</p> <h3>Managing pain</h3> <p>The surgeon will prescribe medicine for pain, such as <a href="/Article?contentid=194&language=English">morphine</a>. If your child has pain, please give this medicine as prescribed. </p> <p>You can also give <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a> for pain with the prescribed medicine. Sometimes your child will only need acetaminophen. </p> <p>The pain medicine may cause <a href="/article?contentid=6&language=English">constipation</a>. To help with this, make sure your child drinks more fluid (liquids) than usual and give your child more fibre in their diet. Foods that are <a href="/article?contentid=964&language=English">high in fibre</a> are fresh fruit, vegetables and bran. </p> <h3>Activity and crutches</h3> <p>Your child will have to use crutches for six weeks. To ensure your child does not slip, make sure your child is wearing good rubber-soled shoes and that the bottoms of the crutches are clean. </p> <p>Your child can go back to school once they feel that they can walk safely with the crutches.</p><h2>When to call the doctor</h2> <p>Call your child's surgeon if your child has any of the following symptoms:</p> <ul> <li>redness, swelling or green or yellow drainage from the incision </li> <li>more pain </li> <li>pain in the other hip </li> </ul> <p>If it is an emergency or if you have any concerns about your child's condition, do not wait. Take your child to the closest emergency department.</p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/slipped_capital_femoral_epiphysis.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/slipped_capital_femoral_epiphysis.jpgSlipped capital femoral epiphysis

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