Toe walking, idiopathicTToe walking, idiopathicToe walking, idiopathicEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalPreschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years)Lower leg;Foot;ToesSkeletal muscleConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-04-11T04:00:00ZJennifer McDermott, PT7.0000000000000072.00000000000001062.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Idiopathic toe walking is when your child continues to walk on their tip toes beyond three years of age. Learn stretches and strengthening exercises, and about proper shoes to help your child.<br></p><figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_toe_walking_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>Most children begin walking at 12 to 14 months with their feet flat on the ground. However, there are some children who begin walking on their tip toes instead. This pattern normally disappears within three to six months of learning how to walk. It almost always is completely gone by the end of the third year.</p><p>Idiopathic toe walking is when a child continues to walk on their tip toes beyond three years of age. They will often stand with their feet flat on the ground, but when walking or running will prefer to be on their toes. If your child does not outgrow tip toe walking by three years of age, take them to see a health-care professional. </p> <br><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Idiopathic toe walking is when a child continues to walk on their tip toes beyond three years of age.</li> <li>Idiopathic toe walking can lead to tight calf muscles and decreased movement of the ankles.</li> <li>Treatment for children younger than six years of age include calf stretches, Achilles tendon stretches and sit to stand exercises.</li> <li>Treatment for children six years of age and older include calf stretches and other exercises including marching on the spot, walking uphill and on uneven surfaces, heel walking and squats.</li> </ul><h2>Features of idiopathic toe walking</h2> <p>Although we do not really know why some children prefer to walk on their toes, we do know that idiopathic toe walkers:</p> <ul> <li>walk on tip toes on both sides</li> <li>are constantly balancing on their toes</li> <li>are physically able to keep up with other children their age</li> <li>walk with straight knees</li> <li>will often be able to stand with their feet flat on the ground</li> <li>often have a family history of toe walking</li> </ul><h2>Help your child with a home exercise program</h2><p>If your child has idiopathic toe walking, a daily home exercise program can be very helpful. The goal is to stretch the calf muscles and strengthen the muscles on the front of the legs. This will help your child to be able to succesfully walk with a heel-to-toe pattern.</p><p>If your child's calf muscles are tight, or ankle motion is limited, you will be shown stretches to do at home with them. These stretches should be followed with activities to help them use their muscles in their new lengthened position.</p><p>These exercises will be necessary and beneficial as long as your child demonstrates a tip toe walking pattern. The exercises will vary with their age. The most important part of the exercise program is to remember to have fun with your child!</p><h2>Stretches and strengthening exercises for children under six years of age</h2><ul class="akh-steps"><li><h3>Calf stretch</h3> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_toe_walking_calfstretch_under6_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Have your child lie on their back on a comfortable surface such as a firm bed.</li><li>With their knee straight and leg supported on the bed, bring your child's foot upwards, toward their head, bending their ankle.</li><li>Hold the stretch at the end of the movement (that is, as far as your child's range of motion will permit) for 15 to 30 seconds. This should not be painful for your child.</li><li>Bring your child's foot back to a normal postion. Repeat the exercise 10 times on each leg, daily.</li></ul></li><li><h3>Achilles tendon stretch</h3> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_toe_walking_achillesstretch_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Have your child lie on their back on a comfortable surface such as a firm bed.</li><li>With their knee bent, bring your child's foot upwards, toward their head, bending their ankle.</li><li>Hold the stretch at the end of the movement (that is, as far as your child's range of motion will permit) for 15 to 30 seconds. This should not be painful for your child.</li><li>Bring your child's foot back to a normal postion. Repeat the exercise 10 times on each leg, daily.</li></ul></li><li><h3>Sit to stand</h3> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_toe_walking_sit_to_stand_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Have your child sit on a children's sized chair or stool.</li><li>Place your hands below their knees, providing a moderate, constant pressure downwards as a cue to keep their heels on the floor.</li><li>Have your child practice standing up while keeping their heels on the ground.</li><li>Make this exercise fun by playing a game of high five, blowing bubbles, reaching for objects, working in front of a mirror or singing songs.</li></ul></li></ul><h2>Exercises suitable for children ages six years and up:</h2><ul class="akh-steps"><li><h3>Calf Stretch</h3> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_walking_calfstretch_6up_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Have your child stand approximately two feet from a wall. Place both of their hands at shoulder height against the wall.</li><li>With their right knee straight, have them step towards the wall with the left foot. They should lean in until a stretch is felt in the back of the right calf. Make sure they keep the heel of the right foot on the ground.</li><li>Hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds.</li><li>Repeat the exercise 10 times on each leg, daily.</li></ul></li><li><h3>Other exercises include:</h3> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Squats</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_walking_squats_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Marching on the spot. Have your child bring their knees up high and then land with a flat foot.</li><li>Walking uphill.</li><li>Walking on uneven surfaces such as in a playground or sand.</li><li>Walking on the heels only. Keep the toes off the ground at all times.</li><li>Practicing squats. With feet flat on the floor, hip width apart, have your child slowly lower their body all the way to the floor by bending at their knees and hips but keeping their chest upright.<br><br><br></li></ul></li></ul><h2>Identify toe walking early to prevent muscle problems</h2> <p>Children who walk on their toes can develop tight calf muscles on the backs of their legs and have decreased movement of their ankles. In addition, the muscles on the front of their legs may become weak. If there is tightness and weakness, your child will have difficulty walking on their heels. Early identification of toe walking can help lead to the prevention of these muscle problems.</p>
Marcher sur la pointe des pieds, idiopathiqueMMarcher sur la pointe des pieds, idiopathiqueToe walking, idiopathicFrenchOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalPreschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years)Lower leg;Foot;ToesSkeletal muscleConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-04-11T04:00:00ZJennifer McDermott, PT7.0000000000000072.00000000000001062.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>​On parle de la marche idiopathique sur la pointe des pieds lorsque votre enfant marche encore sur la pointe de ses pieds après l'âge de 3 ans. Apprenez-en sur les étirements et les exercices de renforcement, ainsi que sur les chaussures appropriées afin d'aider votre enfant.<br></p><figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_toe_walking_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>​La plupart des enfants commencent à marcher entre l'âge de 12 et 14 mois en ayant leurs pieds bien à plat au sol. Par contre, certains enfants commencent à marcher sur la pointe des pieds. Cette démarche disparait habituellement de 3 à 6 mois après l'apprentissage de la marche. Presque tous les enfants ne marchent plus sur la pointe des pieds à la fin de leur troisième année.</p><p>On parle de la marche idiopathique sur la pointe des pieds lorsqu'un enfant marche encore sur la pointe de ses pieds après l'âge de 3 ans. Il se tiendra souvent debout avec ses pieds bien plats au sol, mais préfèrera se tenir sur ses pointes lorsqu'il marchera ou courra. Si votre enfant ne cesse pas de marcher sur la pointe des pieds après l'âge de 3 ans, consultez un professionnel de la santé.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>On parle de la marche idiopathique sur la pointe des pieds lorsqu'un enfant marche encore sur la pointe de ses pieds après l'âge de 3 ans. </li><li>Les enfants qui marchent sur leurs orteils peuvent développer des tensions aux muscles du mollet à l'arrière de leurs jambes et peuvent avoir une diminution de l'amplitude des mouvements de leurs chevilles.</li><li>Traitement pour les enfants de moins de 6 ans comprend les étirements du mollet, étirement du tendon d'Achille, et les exercices d'assis à debout</li><li>Traitement pour les enfants de 6 ans et plus comprend les étirements du mollet et des exercices additionnels, comprennent marcher sur place, monter une côte, marcher sur une surface irrégulière, marcher sur les talons et faire des accroupissements.</li></ul><br><h2>Caractéristiques de la marche idiopathique sur la pointe des pieds</h2><p>Même si nous ne comprenons pas vraiment pourquoi certains enfants préfèrent marcher sur la pointe des pieds, nous savons que les enfants qui pratiquent la marche idiopathique sur la pointe des pieds :</p><ul><li>marchent sur la pointe des pieds autant à gauche qu'à droite;</li><li>se balancent constamment sur leurs orteils;</li><li>sont physiquement capables de suivre des enfants de leur âge;</li><li>marchent avec les genoux bloqués;</li><li>seront souvent capables de se tenir debout en ayant les pieds bien à plat au sol;</li><li>ont souvent des antécédents familiaux de marche sur la pointe des pieds.</li></ul> <h2>Aidez votre enfant à l'aide d'un programme d'exercice à la maison</h2><p>Un programme d'exercice à la maison peut être très utile si votre enfant souffre de marche idiopathique sur la pointe des pieds. Le but de ce programme est d'étirer les muscles du mollet et de renforcer les muscles situés à l'avant des jambes. Ceci aidera votre enfant à adopter une démarche du talon vers les orteils.</p><p>Si les muscles du mollet de votre enfant sont tendus, ou si le mouvement de ses chevilles est limité, on vous enseignera des étirements à pratiquer à la maison avec lui. À la fin des étirements, des activités favorisant l'utilisation de ses muscles dans leur nouvelle position allongée devraient être pratiquées. Ces exercices seront nécessaires et bénéfiques aussi longtemps que votre enfant aura une démarche sur la pointe des pieds. Les exercices seront différents en fonction de son âge. La partie la plus importante de ce programme est de ne pas oublier d'avoir du plaisir avec votre enfant !</p><h2>Étirements et exercices de renforcement pour les enfants de moins de 6 ans</h2><ul class="akh-steps"><li><h3>Étirements du mollet<br></h3> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_toe_walking_calfstretch_under6_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Demandez à votre enfant de s'étendre sur le dos sur une surface confortable comme un lit ferme.</li><li>Avec ses genoux bloqués et ses jambes reposant sur le lit, levez le pied de votre enfant, vers sa tête, la cheville en dorsiflexion.</li><li>Maintenez l'étirement à la fin du mouvement (en respectant les limites d'étirement de votre enfant) de 15 à 30 secondes. Votre enfant ne devrait pas ressentir de douleur.</li><li>Ramenez le pied de votre enfant en position normale. Répétez l'exercice dix fois pour chaque jambe chaque jour.</li></ul></li><li><h3>Étirement du tendon d'Achille</h3> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_toe_walking_achillesstretch_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Demandez à votre enfant de s'étendre sur le dos sur une surface confortable comme un lit ferme.</li><li>Les genoux pliés, soulevez le pied de votre enfant vers sa tête, la cheville en dorsiflexion.<br></li><li>Maintenez l'étirement à la fin du mouvement (en respectant les limites d'étirement de votre enfant) de 15 à 30 secondes. Votre enfant ne devrait pas ressentir de douleur.</li><li>Ramenez le pied de votre enfant en position normale. Répétez l'exercice dix fois pour chaque jambe chaque jour.</li></ul></li><li><h3>D'assis à debout</h3> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_toe_walking_sit_to_stand_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Demandez à votre enfant de s'assoir sur une chaise ou un tabouret pour enfant.</li><li>Placez vos mains en dessous de ses genoux en appliquant une pression modérée et constante, en guise de rappel de garder ses talons au sol.</li><li>Demandez à votre enfant de se lever en maintenant ses talons au sol.</li><li>Amusez-vous au cours de cet exercice en jouant au jeu de "tape m'en cinq ," à souffler des bulles, à attraper des objets, installez-vous devant un miroir ou chantez des chansons.</li></ul></li></ul><h2>Des exercices adaptés aux enfants de 6 ans et plus</h2> <ul class="akh-steps"> <li><h3>Étirements des mollets</h3> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_walking_calfstretch_6up_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Demandez à votre enfant de se tenir debout à une distance d'environ 2 pieds (60 cm) d'un mur. Placez ses deux mains sur le mur à la hauteur de ses épaules.</li><li>En tenant son genou droit bloqué, demandez-lui d'avancer son pied gauche vers le mur. Il devrait se pencher vers le mur jusqu'à ce qu'il ressente un étirement à l'arrière de son mollet droit. Assurez-vous que le talon de son pied droit soit bien à plat au sol.</li><li>Maintenez l'étirement de 15 à 30 secondes.</li><li>Répétez l'exercice 10 fois pour chaque jambe chaque jour.</li></ul></li><li><h3>Des exercices additionnels :<br></h3> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Accroupissements</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_walking_squats_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Marcher sur place. Demandez à votre enfant de lever ses genoux bien hauts et ensuite de déposer son pied bien à plat au sol.</li><li>Monter une côte.</li><li>Marcher sur une surface irrégulière, comme un terrain de jeu ou du sable.</li><li>Marcher sur les talons seulement. Garder les orteils en l'air en tout temps.</li><li>Faire des accroupissements. En ayant les pieds bien à plat au sol, en ligne avec les hanches, demandez à votre enfant de pencher son corps jusqu'au sol en pliant ses genoux et ses hanches, mais en gardant sa poitrine vers le haut.<br></li></ul></li></ul><h2>L'identification précoce de la marche sur la pointe des pieds afin d'éviter des troubles musculaires</h2><p>Les enfants qui marchent sur leurs orteils peuvent développer des tensions aux muscles du mollet à l'arrière de leurs jambes et peuvent avoir une diminution de l'amplitude des mouvements de leurs chevilles. De plus, les muscles à l'avant de leurs jambes peuvent s'affaiblir. S'il y a de la tension et de la faiblesse, votre enfant aura de la difficulté à marcher sur ses talons. L'identification précoce de la marche sur la pointe des pieds peut aider à prévenir ces troubles musculaires.</p>

 

 

Toe walking, idiopathic946.000000000000Toe walking, idiopathicToe walking, idiopathicTEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalPreschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years)Lower leg;Foot;ToesSkeletal muscleConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-04-11T04:00:00ZJennifer McDermott, PT7.0000000000000072.00000000000001062.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Idiopathic toe walking is when your child continues to walk on their tip toes beyond three years of age. Learn stretches and strengthening exercises, and about proper shoes to help your child.<br></p><figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_toe_walking_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>Most children begin walking at 12 to 14 months with their feet flat on the ground. However, there are some children who begin walking on their tip toes instead. This pattern normally disappears within three to six months of learning how to walk. It almost always is completely gone by the end of the third year.</p><p>Idiopathic toe walking is when a child continues to walk on their tip toes beyond three years of age. They will often stand with their feet flat on the ground, but when walking or running will prefer to be on their toes. If your child does not outgrow tip toe walking by three years of age, take them to see a health-care professional. </p> <br><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Idiopathic toe walking is when a child continues to walk on their tip toes beyond three years of age.</li> <li>Idiopathic toe walking can lead to tight calf muscles and decreased movement of the ankles.</li> <li>Treatment for children younger than six years of age include calf stretches, Achilles tendon stretches and sit to stand exercises.</li> <li>Treatment for children six years of age and older include calf stretches and other exercises including marching on the spot, walking uphill and on uneven surfaces, heel walking and squats.</li> </ul><h2>Features of idiopathic toe walking</h2> <p>Although we do not really know why some children prefer to walk on their toes, we do know that idiopathic toe walkers:</p> <ul> <li>walk on tip toes on both sides</li> <li>are constantly balancing on their toes</li> <li>are physically able to keep up with other children their age</li> <li>walk with straight knees</li> <li>will often be able to stand with their feet flat on the ground</li> <li>often have a family history of toe walking</li> </ul><h2>Help your child with a home exercise program</h2><p>If your child has idiopathic toe walking, a daily home exercise program can be very helpful. The goal is to stretch the calf muscles and strengthen the muscles on the front of the legs. This will help your child to be able to succesfully walk with a heel-to-toe pattern.</p><p>If your child's calf muscles are tight, or ankle motion is limited, you will be shown stretches to do at home with them. These stretches should be followed with activities to help them use their muscles in their new lengthened position.</p><p>These exercises will be necessary and beneficial as long as your child demonstrates a tip toe walking pattern. The exercises will vary with their age. The most important part of the exercise program is to remember to have fun with your child!</p><h2>Stretches and strengthening exercises for children under six years of age</h2><ul class="akh-steps"><li><h3>Calf stretch</h3> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_toe_walking_calfstretch_under6_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Have your child lie on their back on a comfortable surface such as a firm bed.</li><li>With their knee straight and leg supported on the bed, bring your child's foot upwards, toward their head, bending their ankle.</li><li>Hold the stretch at the end of the movement (that is, as far as your child's range of motion will permit) for 15 to 30 seconds. This should not be painful for your child.</li><li>Bring your child's foot back to a normal postion. Repeat the exercise 10 times on each leg, daily.</li></ul></li><li><h3>Achilles tendon stretch</h3> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_toe_walking_achillesstretch_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Have your child lie on their back on a comfortable surface such as a firm bed.</li><li>With their knee bent, bring your child's foot upwards, toward their head, bending their ankle.</li><li>Hold the stretch at the end of the movement (that is, as far as your child's range of motion will permit) for 15 to 30 seconds. This should not be painful for your child.</li><li>Bring your child's foot back to a normal postion. Repeat the exercise 10 times on each leg, daily.</li></ul></li><li><h3>Sit to stand</h3> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_toe_walking_sit_to_stand_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Have your child sit on a children's sized chair or stool.</li><li>Place your hands below their knees, providing a moderate, constant pressure downwards as a cue to keep their heels on the floor.</li><li>Have your child practice standing up while keeping their heels on the ground.</li><li>Make this exercise fun by playing a game of high five, blowing bubbles, reaching for objects, working in front of a mirror or singing songs.</li></ul></li></ul><h2>Exercises suitable for children ages six years and up:</h2><ul class="akh-steps"><li><h3>Calf Stretch</h3> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_walking_calfstretch_6up_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Have your child stand approximately two feet from a wall. Place both of their hands at shoulder height against the wall.</li><li>With their right knee straight, have them step towards the wall with the left foot. They should lean in until a stretch is felt in the back of the right calf. Make sure they keep the heel of the right foot on the ground.</li><li>Hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds.</li><li>Repeat the exercise 10 times on each leg, daily.</li></ul></li><li><h3>Other exercises include:</h3> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Squats</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_walking_squats_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Marching on the spot. Have your child bring their knees up high and then land with a flat foot.</li><li>Walking uphill.</li><li>Walking on uneven surfaces such as in a playground or sand.</li><li>Walking on the heels only. Keep the toes off the ground at all times.</li><li>Practicing squats. With feet flat on the floor, hip width apart, have your child slowly lower their body all the way to the floor by bending at their knees and hips but keeping their chest upright.<br><br><br></li></ul></li></ul><h2>Identify toe walking early to prevent muscle problems</h2> <p>Children who walk on their toes can develop tight calf muscles on the backs of their legs and have decreased movement of their ankles. In addition, the muscles on the front of their legs may become weak. If there is tightness and weakness, your child will have difficulty walking on their heels. Early identification of toe walking can help lead to the prevention of these muscle problems.</p><h2>Shoes for your child</h2> <p>Wearing shoes may not correct toe walking. However, appropriate foot wear can help your child bring their heels further down. When selecting shoes for your child, keep in mind the following criteria:</p> <ul> <li>Choose a high cut shoe with a wide sole which provides good foot support.</li> <li>The shoe should be rigid or firm, not flexible in the middle section.</li> <li>The back of the heel should be firm.</li> </ul> <h2>Other treatments</h2> <p>Idiopathic toe walking in children is not a serious condition. It often resolves spontaneously and does not cause the child significant problems apart from the cosmetic appearance. Normally, your child will not need surgery. In addition to stretching and strengthening, treatments may include repeated casting of feet and ankles, bracing devices, or a combination of the two. More recently, the injection of Botulinum Toxin A (Botox) has been used to weaken the calf muscles, thus preventing tip toe walking. You can discuss these treatment options with your physician. It is important to understand that even though your child may achieve short-term improvement in muscle length and ankle range of motion, these treatments may not always guarantee a normal heel-to-toe walking pattern.</p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/toe_walking_ideopathic.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/toe_walking_ideopathic.jpgToe walking, idiopathic

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