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Temperature takingTTemperature takingTemperature takingEnglishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)Fever2016-04-27T04:00:00ZElana Hochstadter, MD;Tania Principi, MD, FRCPC, MSc​7.0000000000000067.00000000000001422.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to correctly take your child's temperature when they have a fever.</p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/aEy9ZIzoHOc?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> </div> <p>Children often feel warm to the touch when they have a <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a>, but putting your hand to your child's forehead is not enough to find out if your child has a fever. To confirm that your child has a fever, use a thermometer to measure your child's body temperature.</p><p> <strong>A temperature of 38°C (100.4°F) or higher is a fever</strong></p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Use a thermometer to find out if a child has a temperature.</li> <li>The best way to take a temperature depends on a child’s age.</li> <li>Always wash thermometers before and after taking a temperature.</li> <li>See your doctor right away if your child has a temperature that last three days or if your child has a temperature and is less than three months old.</li> </ul><h2>When to see a doctor</h2> <h3>See your child's regular doctor or go to the nearest Emergency Department right away if your child has a fever and:</h3> <ul> <li>Your child is less than three months old.</li> <li>You have recently returned from travelling abroad.</li> <li>Your child develops a rash that looks like small purple dots that do not go away when you apply pressure with your fingers (blanching).</li> <li>Your child is not able to keep down any fluids, is not peeing and appears dehydrated.</li> <li>Your child's skin looks very pale or grey, or is cool or mottled.</li> <li>Your child is in constant pain.</li> <li>Your child is lethargic (very weak) or difficult to wake up.</li> <li>Your child has a stiff neck.</li> <li>Your child has a seizure associated with fever for the first time or a long seizure associated with fever.</li> <li>Your child is looking or acting very sick.</li> <li>Your child seems confused or delirious.</li> <li>Your child does not use their arm or leg normally or refuses to stand up.</li> <li>Your child has problems breathing.</li> <li>Your child cries constantly and cannot be settled.</li> </ul> <h3>See a doctor within 24 hours if your child has a fever and:</h3> <ul> <li>Your child is between three and six months old.</li> <li>Your child has specific pain, such as ear or throat pain that may require evaluation.</li> <li>Your child has had a fever for more than three days.</li> <li>The fever went away for over 24 hours and then came back.</li> <li>Your child has a bacterial infection that is being treated with an antibiotic, but the fever is not going away after two to three days of starting the antibiotic.</li> <li>Your child cries when going to the bathroom.</li> <li>You have other concerns or questions.</li> </ul> <p>If you are unsure, call Telehealth Ontario at 1-866-797-0000 (toll-free number) if you live in Ontario.</p><h2>Use a thermometer to measure a temperature</h2> <p>The easiest way to measure your child’s temperature is with a digital thermometer. These are available at most drug stores. </p> <p>You can also use a glass thermometer. Never use glass thermometers that contain mercury because mercury is toxic. If you only have access to a glass thermometer, take very special care. If the thermometer is cracked or damaged in any way, do not use it. Even an undamaged glass thermometer can be a risk for your child. If you believe your child may bite down on the thermometer, do not use it to take a temperature in the mouth.</p> <h3>Four places to take a child’s temperature</h3> <ul> <li>in the mouth</li> <li>in the anus (or rectum)</li> <li>under the armpit</li> <li>in the ear</li> </ul> <p>Do not use a rectal thermometer in the mouth or an oral thermometer in the rectum. Always wash any thermometer with soap and warm water before and after use.</p> <h3>The best way to take a temperature depends on your child’s age</h3> <table class="akh-table"> <thead> <tr><th rowspan="2" colspan="1">Age</th><th rowspan="1" colspan="2">Where to take the temperature</th></tr> <tr><th><em>Most accurate</em></th><th><em>Alternative method</em></th></tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>Newborns to 3 years</td> <td>Rectal temperature (anus)</td> <td>Axial temperature (armpit)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Children over 3 years</td> <td>Oral temperature (mouth)</td> <td>Ear or axial temperature</td> </tr> </tbody> </table><h2>How to take an oral (in the mouth) temperature</h2> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">How to measure an oral temperature</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_temperature_oral_EN.jpg" alt="Girl lying under a blanket while her temperature is taken by mouth" /> </figure> <p>Taking a temperature in the mouth works with children who are old enough to hold the thermometer under their tongue and who will not bite the thermometer. A mouth thermometer is the most accurate way of measuring the temperature of an older child. Make sure your child has not had cold or hot drinks in the 30 minutes before taking their temperature.</p><ul><li>To get an accurate reading, carefully place the tip of the thermometer under your child’s tongue.</li><li>Ask your child to keep the thermometer in place by forming a seal with their lips. Make sure they do not bite down on the thermometer. If they cannot breathe through their nose, use one of the other methods to measure their temperature.</li><li>If you are using a digital thermometer, leave it in the mouth until you hear it beep.</li><li>Carefully read the temperature on the thermometer.</li><li>Turn off the digital thermometer, wash the tip with soap and warm (not hot) water, and wipe it off with alcohol. Dry well.</li></ul><h2>How to take a rectal (in the anus) temperature</h2> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">How to measure a rectal temperature</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_temperature_rectal_EN.jpg" alt="Baby lying on tummy across a lap with thermometer inserted in the baby’s rectum" /> </figure> <p>Using the rectal method works best on babies and young children. Older children may resist having something put in their bum.</p><ul><li>Before taking your child’s temperature, make sure they are relaxed. Place your child on their stomach on a comfortable surface if they can hold their head and do <a href="/Article?contentid=296&language=English">tummy time</a>. Place your child on their back if they are still unable to safely lie on their stomach.</li><li>Before inserting the thermometer, make sure it is clean. Coat the end of it with petroleum jelly (Vaseline). This will make the insertion easier.</li><li>Insert the thermometer gently into your child’s rectum about 2 cm (1 inch). If there is any resistance, pull the thermometer back a little. Never try to force the thermometer past any resistance. You could injure your child by damaging the wall of the bowel.</li><li>Hold your child still while the thermometer is in.</li><li>If you are using a digital thermometer, take it out when you hear the signal (usually a beep or a series of beeps).</li><li>Read the temperature.</li><li>Turn off the digital thermometer, wash the tip with soap and warm (not hot) water. Dry well.</li></ul><h2>How to take an armpit (axillary) temperature</h2> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">How to measure an armpit (axillary) temperature</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_temperature_armpit_EN.jpg" alt="Baby lying on their back with a thermometer held under the armpit" /> </figure> <p>Taking the temperature under the armpit may be less accurate than in the rectum or the mouth but easier in some babies or children. To take a temperature in the armpit, your child must be able to hold their arm to the body and not move it for up to two minutes.</p><ul><li>If you are using a digital thermometer, turn it on.</li><li>Put thermometer under your child’s dry armpit. The silver tip must touch the skin.</li><li>Hold the top of thermometer with one hand and hold down your child’s arm with the other hand.</li><li>If using a digital thermometer, wait until you hear the signal (usually a beep or a series of beeps).</li><li>Turn off the thermometer, wash the tip with soap and warm (not hot) water. Dry well.</li></ul><h2>How to take an ear (tympanic) temperature</h2> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">How to measure an ear (tympanic) temperature</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/IMD_temperature_ear_EN.jpg" alt="Child having temperature taken by ear with one hand pulling the ear up and the other holding the thermometer in the ear" /> </figure> <p>Tympanic thermometers may be less accurate than oral or rectal thermometers. Tympanic thermometers are unsuitable for children under two years of age because their ear canal may be too small to allow for a temperature reading. Always clean the thermometer tip before use and follow the manufacturer’s instructions carefully.</p><ul><li>Gently tug on the ear, pulling it up and back. This will help straighten the ear canal and make a clear path inside the ear to the eardrum.</li><li>Gently insert the thermometer until the ear canal is fully sealed off.</li><li>Squeeze and hold down the button for one second.</li><li>Remove the thermometer and read the temperature.</li></ul><h2>References:</h2><p>Richardson M, Purssell E. (2015). Who's afraid of fever? <em>Arch Dis Child</em>. 100(9):818-20. doi:10.1136/archdischild-2015-309491. Retrieved on February 10th, 2016 <a href="http://adc.bmj.com/content/early/2015/05/14/archdischild-2014-307483.full.pdf+html">http://adc.bmj.com/content/early/2015/05/14/archdischild-2014-307483.full.pdf+html</a></p><p>Sullivan JE, Farrar HC. (2011). Fever and antipyretic use in children. <em>Pediatrics</em>.127(3):580-7. doi:10.1542/peds.2010-3852. Retrieved February 10th, 2016 <a href="http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/127/3/580.full-text.pdf">http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/127/3/580.full-text.pdf</a><br></p><p>Mistry N, Hudak A. (2014). Combined and alternating acetaminophen and ibuprofen therapy for febrile children. <em>Paediatrics & child health</em>. 19(10):531-2. Retrieved on February 10th, 2016 <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4276386/pdf/pch-19-531.pdf">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4276386/pdf/pch-19-531.pdf</a> and Corrigendum. (2015). <em>Paediatrics & Child Health</em>, 20(8), 466–467. Retrieved on February 10th, 2016 <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4699537/">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4699537/</a> </p>
Prise de la températurePPrise de la températureTemperature takingFrenchNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)Fever2016-04-27T04:00:00ZElana Hochstadter, MD;Tania Principi, MD, FRCPC, MSc​7.0000000000000067.00000000000001422.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p> Découvrez comment bien prendre la température de votre enfant quand il a de la fièvre.</p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/aEy9ZIzoHOc?rel=0&hl=fr&cc_load_policy=1" frameborder="0"></iframe> </div><p>​​Les enfants sont souvent chauds au toucher lorsqu’ils ont de la <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=French">fièvre</a>, mais il n’est pas suffisant de simplement mettre la main sur le front de votre enfant pour savoir s’il est fiévreux. Pour le confirmer, utilisez un thermomètre afin de mesurer sa température corporelle.</p><p> <strong>Une température corporelle de 38°C (100,4°F) ou plus indique de la fièvre.</strong></p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Utilisez un thermomètre pour déterminer si votre enfant a de la fièvre.</li> <li>La meilleure façon de prendre la température des enfants varie selon leur âge.</li> <li>Lavez toujours les thermomètres avant et après leur utilisation.</li> <li>Consultez votre médecin immédiatement si votre enfant a une fièvre qui persiste pendant plus de trois jours ou si votre nourrisson a de la fièvre et qu’il a moins de 3 mois.</li></ul><h2>Quand consulter un médecin</h2> <h3>Consultez le médecin de votre enfant ou rendez-vous immédiatement au service d’urgence le plus près si votre enfant a de la fièvre et que :</h3> <ul><li>votre enfant a moins de 3 mois;</li> <li>vous revenez d’un voyage récent à l’étranger;</li> <li>votre enfant développe un érythème qui ressemble à des petits points violets qui ne disparaissent pas lorsque vous appuyez dessus avec vos doigts (blanchissement);</li> <li>votre enfant n’est pas capable de garder les liquides, a cessé d’uriner et semble déshydraté;</li> <li>la peau de votre enfant semble très pâle ou grise, ou est froide ou tachetée;</li> <li>votre enfant souffre constamment;</li> <li>votre enfant est léthargique (très faible) ou vous avez du mal à le réveiller;</li> <li>le cou de votre enfant est raide;</li> <li>votre enfant fait une crise associée à de la fièvre pour la première fois ou une crise prolongée associée à de la fièvre;</li> <li>votre enfant a l’air très malade ou agit comme s’il l’était;</li> <li>votre enfant semble confus ou délirant;</li> <li>votre enfant n’utilise pas un de ses bras ou une de ses jambes de façon normale, ou refuse de se tenir debout;</li> <li>votre enfant a de la difficulté à respirer;</li> <li>votre enfant pleure constamment et ne peut être consolé.</li></ul> <h3>Consultez un médecin dans les 24 heures si votre enfant a de la fièvre et que :</h3> <ul><li>votre enfant est âgé de 3 à 6 mois;</li> <li>votre enfant a mal à un endroit précis, aux oreilles ou à la gorge, par exemple, ce qui peut nécessiter un examen;</li> <li>votre enfant a de la fièvre depuis plus de trois jours;</li> <li>la fièvre a disparu depuis plus de 24 heures puis est revenue;</li> <li>votre enfant a une infection bactérienne qui est traitée avec un antibiotique, mais la fièvre ne disparaît pas même après lui en avoir donné pendant deux ou trois jours;</li> <li>votre enfant pleure lorsqu’il va aux toilettes;</li> <li>vous avez d’autres préoccupations ou d’autres questions.</li></ul> <p>En cas de doute, appelez Télésanté Ontario au 1-866-797-0000 (sans frais) si vous habitez en Ontario.</p><h2>Utilisez un thermomètre pour mesurer la température</h2> <p>Le moyen le plus simple de mesurer la température de votre enfant est d’utiliser un thermomètre numérique. Vous pouvez vous en procurer un dans la plupart des pharmacies.</p> <p>Vous pouvez aussi utiliser un thermomètre en verre. N’utilisez jamais un thermomètre en verre contenant du mercure parce qu’il s’agit d’une substance toxique. Si vous n’avez accès qu’à un thermomètre en verre, utilisez-le avec grande précaution. N’utilisez en aucun cas un thermomètre fissuré ou endomma​gé. Même un thermomètre en verre en bon état peut présenter un risque pour votre enfant. Si vous pensez que votre enfant peut mordre le thermomètre, ne l’utilisez pas pour prendre sa température par la bouche.</p> <h3>Quatre façons de prendre la température d’un enfant :</h3> <ul><li>par la bouche,</li> <li>par l’anus (ou le rectum),</li> <li>sous l’aisselle,</li> <li>par l’oreille.</li></ul> <p>N’insérez pas un thermomètre rectal dans la bouche, ni un thermomètre buccal dans l’anus. Lavez toujours le thermomètre avec du savon et de l’eau tiède avant et après son utilisation.</p> <h3>La meilleure façon de prendre la température d’un enfant varie selon son âge</h3> <table class="akh-table"> <thead> <tr><th rowspan="2" colspan="1">Âge ​</th><th rowspan="1" colspan="2"> ​Comment prendre la température</th></tr> <tr><th><em>Méthode la plus précise​</em></th><th><em>Autre méthode</em></th></tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>De la naissance à l’âge de 3 ans</td> <td>Température rectale (par l’anus)</td> <td> ​Température axillaire (sous l’aisselle)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Enfants âgés de plus de 3 ans​</td> <td> ​Température buccale (par la bouche)</td> <td>Par l’oreille ou sous l’aisselle</td> </tr> </tbody> </table><h2>Prise de la température par la bouche (méthode buccale)</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Prise de la température buccale <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_temperature_oral_FR.jpg" alt="Enfant couchée sous une couverture avec un thermomètre dans la bouche" /> </span></figure> <p>Pour que la température soit prise par la bouche, il faut que les enfants soient suffisamment âgés pour tenir le thermomètre sous la langue et ne pas le mordre. La méthode buccale donne la mesure la plus exacte de la température d’un enfant plus âgé. Assurez-vous que votre enfant n’a pas bu de boissons froides ou chaudes dans les 30 minutes précédant la prise de sa température.</p><ul><li>Pour obtenir une mesure exacte, placez délicatement le bout du thermomètre sous la langue de votre enfant.</li><li>Demandez-lui de le garder en place en fermant bien les lèvres sur le thermomètre. Assurez-vous qu’il ne le mord pas. S’il ne peut pas respirer par le nez, employez une autre méthode pour mesurer sa température.</li><li>Si vous utilisez un thermomètre numérique, laissez-y jusqu’à ce que vous entendiez le signal sonore.</li><li>Faites une lecture attentive du thermomètre.</li><li>Désactivez le thermomètre et lavez le bout avec du savon et de l’eau tiède (n’utilisez pas de l’eau chaude) et désinfectez-le avec de l’alcool, puis séchez-le bien.</li></ul><h2>Prise de la température par l’anus (méthode rectale)</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Prise de la température rectale <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_temperature_rectal_FR.jpg" alt="Bébé étendu sur son ventre sur les genoux d’une personne insérant un thermomètre dans le rectum du bébé" /> </span></figure> <p>Chez les bébés et les tout-petits, la méthode rectale est la plus efficace. Il se peut que les enfants plus âgés s’agitent si vous tentez de leur insérer un objet dans le derrière.</p><ul><li>Avant de prendre la température de votre enfant, assurez-vous qu’il est détendu. Installez-le confortablement <a href="/Article?contentid=296&language=French">sur le ventre​</a> s’il a le contrôle de sa tête et qu’il est habitué à être dans cette position. Installez-le sur le dos s’il ne peut pas en toute sécurité se coucher sur le ventre.</li><li>Avant d’insérer le thermomètre, assurez-vous qu’il est propre. Enrobez le bout avec de la gelée de pétrole (Vaseline) pour en faciliter l’insertion.</li><li>Insérez doucement le thermomètre dans l’anus sur une profondeur d’environ 2 cm (1 pouce). Si vous ressentez une résistance, retirez-le légèrement. N’essayez jamais de forcer l’entrée d’un thermomètre, car vous pourriez abîmer la paroi interne des intestins.</li><li>Tenez votre enfant immobile pendant que le thermomètre est dans l’anus.</li><li>Si vous utilisez un thermomètre numérique, retirez-le quand vous entendez le signal sonore (habituellement un bip ou une suite de bips).</li><li>Faites la lecture du thermomètre.</li><li>Désactivez le thermomètre, lavez le bout avec du savon et de l’eau tiède (n’utilisez pas de l’eau chaude), puis séchez-le bien.</li></ul><h2>Prise de la température sous l’aisselle (méthode axillaire)</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Prise de la température axillaire (sous l’aisselle) <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_temperature_armpit_FR.jpg" alt="Un bébé allongé sur son dos avec un thermomètre sous l’aisselle" /> </span></figure> <p>Même si la température prise sous l’aisselle est moins précise que celle prise par l’anus ou par la bouche, il est plus facile d’employer cette méthode chez certains bébés ou certains enfants. Pour prendre la température sous l’aisselle, assurez-vous que votre enfant tient le bras le long du corps sans le bouger pendant environ deux minutes.</p><ul><li>Si vous utilisez un thermomètre numérique, activez-le.</li><li>Assurez-vous que l’aisselle est bien sèche et placez-y le thermomètre. Le bout argent doit toucher la peau.</li><li>Tenez la partie supérieure du thermomètre avec une main, et le bras de votre enfant avec l’autre.</li><li>Si vous employez un thermomètre numérique, retirez-le de l’aisselle quand vous entendez le signal sonore (un bip ou une suite de bips).</li><li>Désactivez le thermomètre. Lavez le bout avec du savon et de l’eau tiède (n’utilisez pas de l’eau chaude), puis séchez-le bien.</li> ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​</ul><h2>Prise de la température par l’oreille (méthode tympanique) </h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Prise de la température auriculaire (dans l’oreille) </span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_temperature_ear_FR.jpg" alt="Enfant regardant droit devant lui lorsque quelqu’un tire le haut de son oreille et tient un thermomètre là-dedans" /></figure> <p>Il est moins efficace de prendre la température par l’oreille que par la bouche ou par l’anus. Les thermomètres tympaniques ne sont pas recommandés pour les bébés de moins de deux ans. Il se peut que leur canal auditif soit trop étroit pour une lecture de la température. Avant son utilisation, lavez toujours le bout du thermomètre et suivez bien les directives du fabricant.</p><ul><li>Tirez délicatement l’oreille vers le haut et vers l’arrière. Cela aidera à maintenir le canal plus droit pour que le thermomètre puisse pénétrer jusqu’au tympan. </li><li>Insérez doucement le thermomètre dans le canal auditif jusqu’à ce que ce dernier soit bien bouché.</li><li>Appuyez sur le bouton du thermomètre et tenez-le enfoncé pendant une seconde. </li></ul><p>Retirez le thermomètre de l’oreille et lisez la température affichée. </p><h2>References:</h2><p>Richardson M, Purssell E. (2015). Who's afraid of fever? <em>Arch Dis Child</em>. 100(9):818-20. doi:10.1136/archdischild-2015-309491. Retrieved on February 10th, 2016 <a href="http://adc.bmj.com/content/early/2015/05/14/archdischild-2014-307483.full.pdf+html">http://adc.bmj.com/content/early/2015/05/14/archdischild-2014-307483.full.pdf+html</a></p><p>Sullivan JE, Farrar HC. (2011). Fever and antipyretic use in children. <em>Pediatrics</em>.127(3):580-7. doi:10.1542/peds.2010-3852. Retrieved February 10th, 2016 <a href="http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/127/3/580.full-text.pdf">http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/127/3/580.full-text.pdf</a> </p><p>Mistry N, Hudak A. (2014). Combined and alternating acetaminophen and ibuprofen therapy for febrile children. <em>Paediatrics & child health</em>. 19(10):531-2. Retrieved on February 10th, 2016 <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4276386/pdf/pch-19-531.pdf">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4276386/pdf/pch-19-531.pdf</a> and Corrigendum. (2015). <em>Paediatrics & Child Health</em>, 20(8), 466–467. Retrieved on February 10th, 2016 <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4699537/">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4699537/</a> </p>
قياس درجة الحرارةققياس درجة الحرارةTemperature takingArabicNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)Fever2011-05-09T04:00:00ZNA8.0000000000000064.00000000000001425.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>تشرح هذه الصفحة كيفية قياس درجة حرارة الطفل.</p>
測量體溫測量體溫Temperature TakingChineseTraditionalNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)Fever2011-05-09T04:00:00Z64.00000000000008.000000000000001425.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z本頁面介紹如何測量兒童或嬰兒的體溫。
Medición de la temperaturaMMedición de la temperaturaTemperature TakingSpanishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2011-05-09T04:00:00Z64.00000000000008.000000000000001425.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Esta página le explica cómo tomar la temperatura de un niño o bebé.</p>
درجہ حرارت کی پیمائش کرناددرجہ حرارت کی پیمائش کرناTemperature TakingUrduNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2011-05-09T04:00:00Z64.00000000000008.000000000000001425.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>یہ صفحہ اس بات کی وضاحت کرتا ھے کہ شیرخوار اور بڑے بچوں کے بخار کی پیمائش کیسے کرنی ھے۔</p>
உடல் வெப்பநிலையை அளவிடுதல்உடல் வெப்பநிலையை அளவிடுதல்Temperature TakingTamilNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2011-05-09T04:00:00Z64.00000000000008.000000000000001425.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p> ஒரு பிள்ளையின் அல்லது குழந்தையின் உடல் வெப்பநிலையை எப்படி அளவிடுவது என்பதைப் பற்றி இந்தப் பக்கம் விபரிக்கிறது.</p>

 

 

Temperature taking966.000000000000Temperature takingTemperature takingTEnglishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)Fever2016-04-27T04:00:00ZElana Hochstadter, MD;Tania Principi, MD, FRCPC, MSc​7.0000000000000067.00000000000001422.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to correctly take your child's temperature when they have a fever.</p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/aEy9ZIzoHOc?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> </div> <p>Children often feel warm to the touch when they have a <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a>, but putting your hand to your child's forehead is not enough to find out if your child has a fever. To confirm that your child has a fever, use a thermometer to measure your child's body temperature.</p><p> <strong>A temperature of 38°C (100.4°F) or higher is a fever</strong></p><h2>Converting Fahrenheit (°F) and Celsius (°C)</h2> <p>Temperatures are measured in degrees Celsius (°C) or degrees Fahrenheit (°F). The table below shows equivalent Celsius and Fahrenheit temperatures.</p> <table class="akh-table"> <thead> <tr><th>°C</th><th>°F</th></tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>37°C</td> <td>98.6°F</td> </tr> <tr> <td>37.2°C </td> <td>99°F</td> </tr> <tr> <td>37.5°C </td> <td>99.5°F</td> </tr> <tr> <td>37.8°C </td> <td>100°F</td> </tr> <tr> <td>38°C </td> <td>100.4°F</td> </tr> <tr> <td>38.3°C </td> <td>101°F</td> </tr> <tr> <td>38.9°C </td> <td>102°F</td> </tr> <tr> <td>39.5°C </td> <td>103°F</td> </tr> <tr> <td>40°C </td> <td>104°F</td> </tr> <tr> <td>40.6°C </td> <td>105°F</td> </tr> <tr> <td>41.1°C </td> <td>106°F</td> </tr> <tr> <td>41.7°C </td> <td>107°F</td> </tr> </tbody> </table><br><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Use a thermometer to find out if a child has a temperature.</li> <li>The best way to take a temperature depends on a child’s age.</li> <li>Always wash thermometers before and after taking a temperature.</li> <li>See your doctor right away if your child has a temperature that last three days or if your child has a temperature and is less than three months old.</li> </ul><h2>When to see a doctor</h2> <h3>See your child's regular doctor or go to the nearest Emergency Department right away if your child has a fever and:</h3> <ul> <li>Your child is less than three months old.</li> <li>You have recently returned from travelling abroad.</li> <li>Your child develops a rash that looks like small purple dots that do not go away when you apply pressure with your fingers (blanching).</li> <li>Your child is not able to keep down any fluids, is not peeing and appears dehydrated.</li> <li>Your child's skin looks very pale or grey, or is cool or mottled.</li> <li>Your child is in constant pain.</li> <li>Your child is lethargic (very weak) or difficult to wake up.</li> <li>Your child has a stiff neck.</li> <li>Your child has a seizure associated with fever for the first time or a long seizure associated with fever.</li> <li>Your child is looking or acting very sick.</li> <li>Your child seems confused or delirious.</li> <li>Your child does not use their arm or leg normally or refuses to stand up.</li> <li>Your child has problems breathing.</li> <li>Your child cries constantly and cannot be settled.</li> </ul> <h3>See a doctor within 24 hours if your child has a fever and:</h3> <ul> <li>Your child is between three and six months old.</li> <li>Your child has specific pain, such as ear or throat pain that may require evaluation.</li> <li>Your child has had a fever for more than three days.</li> <li>The fever went away for over 24 hours and then came back.</li> <li>Your child has a bacterial infection that is being treated with an antibiotic, but the fever is not going away after two to three days of starting the antibiotic.</li> <li>Your child cries when going to the bathroom.</li> <li>You have other concerns or questions.</li> </ul> <p>If you are unsure, call Telehealth Ontario at 1-866-797-0000 (toll-free number) if you live in Ontario.</p><h2>Use a thermometer to measure a temperature</h2> <p>The easiest way to measure your child’s temperature is with a digital thermometer. These are available at most drug stores. </p> <p>You can also use a glass thermometer. Never use glass thermometers that contain mercury because mercury is toxic. If you only have access to a glass thermometer, take very special care. If the thermometer is cracked or damaged in any way, do not use it. Even an undamaged glass thermometer can be a risk for your child. If you believe your child may bite down on the thermometer, do not use it to take a temperature in the mouth.</p> <h3>Four places to take a child’s temperature</h3> <ul> <li>in the mouth</li> <li>in the anus (or rectum)</li> <li>under the armpit</li> <li>in the ear</li> </ul> <p>Do not use a rectal thermometer in the mouth or an oral thermometer in the rectum. Always wash any thermometer with soap and warm water before and after use.</p> <h3>The best way to take a temperature depends on your child’s age</h3> <table class="akh-table"> <thead> <tr><th rowspan="2" colspan="1">Age</th><th rowspan="1" colspan="2">Where to take the temperature</th></tr> <tr><th><em>Most accurate</em></th><th><em>Alternative method</em></th></tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>Newborns to 3 years</td> <td>Rectal temperature (anus)</td> <td>Axial temperature (armpit)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Children over 3 years</td> <td>Oral temperature (mouth)</td> <td>Ear or axial temperature</td> </tr> </tbody> </table><h2>How to take an oral (in the mouth) temperature</h2> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">How to measure an oral temperature</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_temperature_oral_EN.jpg" alt="Girl lying under a blanket while her temperature is taken by mouth" /> </figure> <p>Taking a temperature in the mouth works with children who are old enough to hold the thermometer under their tongue and who will not bite the thermometer. A mouth thermometer is the most accurate way of measuring the temperature of an older child. Make sure your child has not had cold or hot drinks in the 30 minutes before taking their temperature.</p><ul><li>To get an accurate reading, carefully place the tip of the thermometer under your child’s tongue.</li><li>Ask your child to keep the thermometer in place by forming a seal with their lips. Make sure they do not bite down on the thermometer. If they cannot breathe through their nose, use one of the other methods to measure their temperature.</li><li>If you are using a digital thermometer, leave it in the mouth until you hear it beep.</li><li>Carefully read the temperature on the thermometer.</li><li>Turn off the digital thermometer, wash the tip with soap and warm (not hot) water, and wipe it off with alcohol. Dry well.</li></ul><h2>How to take a rectal (in the anus) temperature</h2> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">How to measure a rectal temperature</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_temperature_rectal_EN.jpg" alt="Baby lying on tummy across a lap with thermometer inserted in the baby’s rectum" /> </figure> <p>Using the rectal method works best on babies and young children. Older children may resist having something put in their bum.</p><ul><li>Before taking your child’s temperature, make sure they are relaxed. Place your child on their stomach on a comfortable surface if they can hold their head and do <a href="/Article?contentid=296&language=English">tummy time</a>. Place your child on their back if they are still unable to safely lie on their stomach.</li><li>Before inserting the thermometer, make sure it is clean. Coat the end of it with petroleum jelly (Vaseline). This will make the insertion easier.</li><li>Insert the thermometer gently into your child’s rectum about 2 cm (1 inch). If there is any resistance, pull the thermometer back a little. Never try to force the thermometer past any resistance. You could injure your child by damaging the wall of the bowel.</li><li>Hold your child still while the thermometer is in.</li><li>If you are using a digital thermometer, take it out when you hear the signal (usually a beep or a series of beeps).</li><li>Read the temperature.</li><li>Turn off the digital thermometer, wash the tip with soap and warm (not hot) water. Dry well.</li></ul><h2>How to take an armpit (axillary) temperature</h2> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">How to measure an armpit (axillary) temperature</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_temperature_armpit_EN.jpg" alt="Baby lying on their back with a thermometer held under the armpit" /> </figure> <p>Taking the temperature under the armpit may be less accurate than in the rectum or the mouth but easier in some babies or children. To take a temperature in the armpit, your child must be able to hold their arm to the body and not move it for up to two minutes.</p><ul><li>If you are using a digital thermometer, turn it on.</li><li>Put thermometer under your child’s dry armpit. The silver tip must touch the skin.</li><li>Hold the top of thermometer with one hand and hold down your child’s arm with the other hand.</li><li>If using a digital thermometer, wait until you hear the signal (usually a beep or a series of beeps).</li><li>Turn off the thermometer, wash the tip with soap and warm (not hot) water. Dry well.</li></ul><h2>How to take an ear (tympanic) temperature</h2> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">How to measure an ear (tympanic) temperature</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/IMD_temperature_ear_EN.jpg" alt="Child having temperature taken by ear with one hand pulling the ear up and the other holding the thermometer in the ear" /> </figure> <p>Tympanic thermometers may be less accurate than oral or rectal thermometers. Tympanic thermometers are unsuitable for children under two years of age because their ear canal may be too small to allow for a temperature reading. Always clean the thermometer tip before use and follow the manufacturer’s instructions carefully.</p><ul><li>Gently tug on the ear, pulling it up and back. This will help straighten the ear canal and make a clear path inside the ear to the eardrum.</li><li>Gently insert the thermometer until the ear canal is fully sealed off.</li><li>Squeeze and hold down the button for one second.</li><li>Remove the thermometer and read the temperature.</li></ul><h2>Temperature checking methods to avoid</h2> <p>Digital electronic pacifier thermometers and temperature strips (which measure temperature on the forehead) are inaccurate and unreliable. Do not use these methods to take your child's temperature. </p> <p>Touching your child's forehead or neck may give you a hint that your child has a fever, but this is not a reliable way to check for fever. Confirm your suspicion of a fever by taking a true measurement using the methods explained above.</p><h2>References:</h2><p>Richardson M, Purssell E. (2015). Who's afraid of fever? <em>Arch Dis Child</em>. 100(9):818-20. doi:10.1136/archdischild-2015-309491. Retrieved on February 10th, 2016 <a href="http://adc.bmj.com/content/early/2015/05/14/archdischild-2014-307483.full.pdf+html">http://adc.bmj.com/content/early/2015/05/14/archdischild-2014-307483.full.pdf+html</a></p><p>Sullivan JE, Farrar HC. (2011). Fever and antipyretic use in children. <em>Pediatrics</em>.127(3):580-7. doi:10.1542/peds.2010-3852. Retrieved February 10th, 2016 <a href="http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/127/3/580.full-text.pdf">http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/127/3/580.full-text.pdf</a><br></p><p>Mistry N, Hudak A. (2014). Combined and alternating acetaminophen and ibuprofen therapy for febrile children. <em>Paediatrics & child health</em>. 19(10):531-2. Retrieved on February 10th, 2016 <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4276386/pdf/pch-19-531.pdf">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4276386/pdf/pch-19-531.pdf</a> and Corrigendum. (2015). <em>Paediatrics & Child Health</em>, 20(8), 466–467. Retrieved on February 10th, 2016 <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4699537/">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4699537/</a> </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_temperature_oral_EN.jpgTemperature takingFalse

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