Positional plagiocephaly (baby flat-head): Treatment with a corrective helmet/cranial remolding orthosis (CRO)PPositional plagiocephaly (baby flat-head): Treatment with a corrective helmet/cranial remolding orthosis (CRO)Positional plagiocephaly (baby flat-head): Treatment with a corrective helmet/cranial remolding orthosis (CRO)EnglishPlasticsNewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)SkullBonesNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2020-05-08T04:00:00Z8.9000000000000058.9000000000000801.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn how a corrective helmet is worn and helps correct the shape of your child's skull over time.</p><h2>What is positional plagiocephaly?</h2><p>Positional plagiocephaly (say: play-gee-o-SEFF-ah-lee) is asymmetry in the shape of a baby's skull, also known as "baby flat-head." </p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Positional plagiocephaly</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/positional_plagiocephaly_MED_ILL_EN.png" alt="Top view of a normal skull shape and of a distorted skull shape due to positional flattening" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A part of your baby’s skull can become flattened if your baby is always on his back or prefers to look in one direction.</figcaption> </figure> <p>A part of your newborn's skull can become flattened if your baby is always on their back or prefers to look in one direction. Changing your baby's position often and putting them on their tummy to play several times a day will help prevent your baby from developing a flattened skull. If your child develops positional plagiocephaly, tummy time and repositioning may be recommended by your physician initially to try to address the flattening. This is most effective when babies are between zero and six months of age. A corrective helmet may be recommended if there is no change in your baby's head shape with repositioning or if there is moderate-to-severe skull asymmetry. <strong>The ideal time to have a child assessed for helmet therapy is between five and six months of age.</strong></p><h2>What is a corrective helmet?<br></h2><p>A corrective helmet, or CRO, is a custom-made medical device used to address plagiocephaly in children with moderate-to-severe skull asymmetry. The helmet uses gentle holding pressures to reshape the skull over time as it redirects the head's growth into the areas that are flat. <strong>The helmet does not affect the neurological development of a child.</strong></p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Orthotic helmet</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Orthotic_helmet_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Baby wearing orthotic helmet and a view of the head inside the helmet from above" /> </figure><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>A corrective helmet can help treat your baby's plagiocephaly or "baby flat-head." </li> <li>The helmet is designed to correct the shape of your child's skull over time. </li> <li>Your child will likely need to wear the helmet for four to six months. </li> <li>You and your child will need to visit the orthotist several times to measure, cast and fit your child's helmet. </li> </ul><h2>How long will your child need to wear the helmet?</h2> <p>Your child will likely need to wear the helmet for four to six months or more, depending on your child's rate of growth. It is recommended that your child wear the helmet between 22 and 23 hours per day. Your orthotist will give you specific recommendations based on your child's situation. Most children complete treatment between 12 and 15 months of age.<br></p><h2>Helmet therapy<br></h2><h3>Initial visit: Assessment and scan</h3><p>At the first visit, an orthotist will evaluate your baby’s head shape clinically and use 3D scanning technology to capture a 3D shape of the head.</p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Stockinette</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Stockingette_for_helmet_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Baby wearing stockinette over the head and body" /></figure> <p>In the process of obtaining a scan for your child's helmet, a layer of nylon stockinette will be put on your child’s head with a hole cut for the face and/or ears. The 3D scanner uses a combination of light and cameras to capture the shape; there is no radiation exposure. The scan itself typically take two to three seconds. The digital replica of your child’s head will be corrected in order to make your child’s individual helmet.</p><h3>Second visit: Fitting appointment</h3><p>This visit will be booked two weeks after the first visit and typically lasts an hour to an hour and a half. At this visit, you will be taught the proper use and care of the helmet.</p><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>SickKids fits the Starband helmet. For more information, please visit the <a href="https://www.orthomerica.com/product-category/starband/">Orthomerica Starband website</a>.</p><p>A minimum of 50% of the payment for this device is expected at the time of the casting. The remaining 50% of the cost is expected when you receive the helmet. The Children’s Orthotics Clinic is unable to bill your insurance company directly.</p><p>Please visit or contact The Children’s Orthotics Clinic for further information on pricing.</p><p>All proceeds from orthotic treatment at The Children’s Orthotics Clinic go to support patient care and research at SickKids. For more information, please visit <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/childrensorthoticsclinic/index.html">www.sickkids.ca/childrensorthoticsclinic</a>.</p><h3>Coverage for the corrective helmet</h3><p>In Ontario, OHIP does not cover any of the cost of the corrective helmet; however, most extended health insurance plans may cover all or a portion depending on your coverage. Ask your orthotist for an insurance letter to submit to your insurance company for coverage. If you need help to pay for the helmet, visit the reception desk for a listing of charitable organizations that may assist you.</p><h2>Virtual care services for children<br></h2><p>Boomerang Health was opened by SickKids to provide communities in Ontario with greater access to community-based services for children and adolescents. For more information on virtual care services in Ontario to support neurodevelopmental physiotherapy, visit <a href="http://www.boomeranghealth.com/services/neural-development-children/">Boomerang Health</a> powered by SickKids.<br></p>
Plagiocéphalie : Traitement avec un casque correcteurPPlagiocéphalie : Traitement avec un casque correcteurPlagiocephaly (flat head syndrome): Treatment with a corrective helmetFrenchPlasticsNewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)SkullBonesNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-12-29T05:00:00Z7.0000000000000072.00000000000001708.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>​Apprenez comment porter un casque correcteur et sachez comment il peut contribuer avec le temps à corriger la forme du crâne de votre enfant.</p><h2>Qu'est-ce que la plagiocéphalie?</h2><p>La plagiocéphalie est une asymétrie de la boîte crânienne d’un bébé. Le crâne n'est pas bien rond mais semble plutôt aplati. </p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Plagiocéphalie positionnelle</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/positional_plagiocephaly_MED_ILL_FR.png" alt="Vue de dessus d’une forme normale du crâne et d’une déformation du crâne à cause de l’aplatissement attribuable à la position" /><figcaption class="“asset-image-caption”">Une partie du crâne du bébé peut s'aplatir s'il est toujours sur le dos ou s'il préfère regarder dans un sens.</figcaption></figure> <h2>Qu’est-ce qu’un casque correcteur?</h2><p>Un casque correcteur est un type d’orthèse (dispositif médical). Il est fait sur mesure et sert à traiter une plagiocéphalie chez les enfants avec une asymétrie de la boîte crânienne modérée à grave. Le casque est conçu pour reformer le crâne avec le temps. </p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Casque orthopédique </span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Orthotic_helmet_EQUIP_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="Bébé portant un casque orthopédique et une vue d’au-dessus de la tête dans le casque" /></figure><br><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Un casque correcteur peut contribuer à traiter la plagiocéphalie de votre bébé.</li> <li>Le casque est conçu pour corriger avec le temps la forme du crâne de votre enfant.</li> <li>Votre enfant devra probablement porter le casque pendant 4 à 6 mois.</li> <li>Vous et votre enfant devrez visiter l’orthésiste plusieurs fois pour prendre des mesures, faire le moulage du casque et ajuster le casque de votre enfant.</li></ul><h2>Combien de temps votre enfant devra-t-il porter le casque correcteur?</h2> <p>Votre enfant devra probablement porter le casque 4 à 6 mois. On recommande que votre enfant porte le casque de 18 à 22 heures par jour. Votre orthésiste vous fera des recommandations précises selon les besoins de votre enfant.</p><h2>Première visite : mesure et moulage</h2><p>Une visite initiale avec un orthésiste est nécessaire pour mesurer la tête de votre enfant et préparer un moule pour le casque. Les mesures de la tête de votre enfant sont prises avec un mètre-ruban et d’un pied à coulisse (instrument de mesure). Cela prend 20 à 40 minutes. </p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Jersey tubulaire</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Stockingette_for_helmet_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Bébé portant le jersey tubulaire sur la tête et le corps" /><figcaption class="“asset-image-caption”">Afin de créer un moule pour le casque de votre enfant, on place deux épaisseurs de jersey tubulaire sur la tête de votre enfant et l'on y fait un trou pour le visage.</figcaption></figure> <h3>Mesures</h3><p>Deux mesures de la tête de votre enfant sont prises :</p><ul><li>la circonférence (le tour du crâne),</li><li>la distance du nez à l'oreille droite et à la gauche.</li></ul><h3>Moulage</h3><p>Le moulage de la tête de votre enfant se fait en trois étapes :</p><ul><li>Deux couches de matériau en coton seront enfilées sur la tête de votre enfant et un trou sera coupé pour son visage pour qu’il puisse voir.</li><li>Des marques seront apposées sur le matériau de coton avec un feutre permanent. Ces marques seront placées sur le front, à l’arrière de la tête, au centre de chaque oreille et autour de chaque oreille.</li><li>Enfin, des bandes plâtrées seront enroulées autour de la tête de votre enfant. On appelle cela le « moulage ». Les bandes durciront et le tout sera simplement soulevé et enlevé de la tête de votre enfant sans recourir à des outils coupants.</li></ul><p>Le moulage prend environ 20 minutes et il peut être un peu salissant. Bien que nous essayons autant que possible de protéger les vêtements de votre enfant, nous vous recommandons de l’habiller avec de vieux vêtements pour le moulage. </p><h2>Deuxième visite : ajustement du casque</h2><p>Une visite de suivi est nécessaire pour s’assurer que le casque soit correctement ajusté. Cette visite aura lieu 2 ou 3 semaines après la visite initiale pour le moulage. Lors de cette deuxième visite, on vous apprendra à utiliser le casque et à en prendre soin.</p><h3>Il faut de 2 heures à 2 ½ heures pour ajuster correctement le casque de votre enfant</h3><p>Le casque sera placé sur la tête de votre enfant plusieurs fois pour établir correctement les lignes pour le découpage. Ensuite, on terminera le casque en ponçant les bords, en ajoutant les sangles et en partageant le casque dans la bonne position. </p><p>Pendant l’étape finale du processus, vous pourrez prendre une pose. À votre retour, on vous apprendra à utiliser le casque et à en prendre soin. </p><ul><li>Ajustement initial (45 minutes) : vous et votre enfant devez être présents;</li><li>Ajustement final (1 heure) : vous et votre enfant pouvez prendre une pose;</li><li>Instructions pour les parents (30 minutes) : vous et votre enfant devez être présents.</li></ul><h2>À l’hôpital SickKids :</h2><h3>Combien coûte le casque ?</h3><p>En Ontario, l’assurance-santé ne couvre pas les coûts du casque correcteur; cependant, la plupart des assurances médicales complémentaires peuvent couvrir la totalité ou une partie de ces frais. Demandez à votre orthésiste de vous fournir une lettre pour votre société d’assurance. Si vous avez besoin d’aide pour payer le casque correcteur, demandez au personnel à la réception une liste des organismes de charité qui pourraient vous aider.</p><p>Il faut débourser au moins 50 % du paiement au moment du coulage du casque. Le solde (les 50 % qui restent) devra être versé lorsque vous recevrez le casque. Il nous est impossible de facturer directement votre société d’assurance.</p><p>Veuillez consulter le Centre d’orthétique pour obtenir plus de renseignements sur les prix.</p>

 

 

 

 

Positional plagiocephaly (baby flat-head): Treatment with a corrective helmet/cranial remolding orthosis (CRO)972.000000000000Positional plagiocephaly (baby flat-head): Treatment with a corrective helmet/cranial remolding orthosis (CRO)Positional plagiocephaly (baby flat-head): Treatment with a corrective helmet/cranial remolding orthosis (CRO)PEnglishPlasticsNewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)SkullBonesNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2020-05-08T04:00:00Z8.9000000000000058.9000000000000801.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn how a corrective helmet is worn and helps correct the shape of your child's skull over time.</p><h2>What is positional plagiocephaly?</h2><p>Positional plagiocephaly (say: play-gee-o-SEFF-ah-lee) is asymmetry in the shape of a baby's skull, also known as "baby flat-head." </p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Positional plagiocephaly</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/positional_plagiocephaly_MED_ILL_EN.png" alt="Top view of a normal skull shape and of a distorted skull shape due to positional flattening" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A part of your baby’s skull can become flattened if your baby is always on his back or prefers to look in one direction.</figcaption> </figure> <p>A part of your newborn's skull can become flattened if your baby is always on their back or prefers to look in one direction. Changing your baby's position often and putting them on their tummy to play several times a day will help prevent your baby from developing a flattened skull. If your child develops positional plagiocephaly, tummy time and repositioning may be recommended by your physician initially to try to address the flattening. This is most effective when babies are between zero and six months of age. A corrective helmet may be recommended if there is no change in your baby's head shape with repositioning or if there is moderate-to-severe skull asymmetry. <strong>The ideal time to have a child assessed for helmet therapy is between five and six months of age.</strong></p><h2>What is a corrective helmet?<br></h2><p>A corrective helmet, or CRO, is a custom-made medical device used to address plagiocephaly in children with moderate-to-severe skull asymmetry. The helmet uses gentle holding pressures to reshape the skull over time as it redirects the head's growth into the areas that are flat. <strong>The helmet does not affect the neurological development of a child.</strong></p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Orthotic helmet</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Orthotic_helmet_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Baby wearing orthotic helmet and a view of the head inside the helmet from above" /> </figure><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>A corrective helmet can help treat your baby's plagiocephaly or "baby flat-head." </li> <li>The helmet is designed to correct the shape of your child's skull over time. </li> <li>Your child will likely need to wear the helmet for four to six months. </li> <li>You and your child will need to visit the orthotist several times to measure, cast and fit your child's helmet. </li> </ul><h2>Follow-up visit schedule</h2><p>You will have a follow-up visit with your orthotist two weeks after the fitting and then every four weeks until the end of treatment. Your child’s head will be examined for shape changes. A 3D scan will be taken every second appointment and will be compared to the previous scan. This helps with tracking your child’s progress. There may be adjustments made to your child’s helmet at these visits.</p><h2>How long will your child need to wear the helmet?</h2> <p>Your child will likely need to wear the helmet for four to six months or more, depending on your child's rate of growth. It is recommended that your child wear the helmet between 22 and 23 hours per day. Your orthotist will give you specific recommendations based on your child's situation. Most children complete treatment between 12 and 15 months of age.<br></p><h2>Helmet therapy<br></h2><h3>Initial visit: Assessment and scan</h3><p>At the first visit, an orthotist will evaluate your baby’s head shape clinically and use 3D scanning technology to capture a 3D shape of the head.</p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Stockinette</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Stockingette_for_helmet_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Baby wearing stockinette over the head and body" /></figure> <p>In the process of obtaining a scan for your child's helmet, a layer of nylon stockinette will be put on your child’s head with a hole cut for the face and/or ears. The 3D scanner uses a combination of light and cameras to capture the shape; there is no radiation exposure. The scan itself typically take two to three seconds. The digital replica of your child’s head will be corrected in order to make your child’s individual helmet.</p><h3>Second visit: Fitting appointment</h3><p>This visit will be booked two weeks after the first visit and typically lasts an hour to an hour and a half. At this visit, you will be taught the proper use and care of the helmet.</p><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>SickKids fits the Starband helmet. For more information, please visit the <a href="https://www.orthomerica.com/product-category/starband/">Orthomerica Starband website</a>.</p><p>A minimum of 50% of the payment for this device is expected at the time of the casting. The remaining 50% of the cost is expected when you receive the helmet. The Children’s Orthotics Clinic is unable to bill your insurance company directly.</p><p>Please visit or contact The Children’s Orthotics Clinic for further information on pricing.</p><p>All proceeds from orthotic treatment at The Children’s Orthotics Clinic go to support patient care and research at SickKids. For more information, please visit <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/childrensorthoticsclinic/index.html">www.sickkids.ca/childrensorthoticsclinic</a>.</p><h3>Coverage for the corrective helmet</h3><p>In Ontario, OHIP does not cover any of the cost of the corrective helmet; however, most extended health insurance plans may cover all or a portion depending on your coverage. Ask your orthotist for an insurance letter to submit to your insurance company for coverage. If you need help to pay for the helmet, visit the reception desk for a listing of charitable organizations that may assist you.</p><h2>Virtual care services for children<br></h2><p>Boomerang Health was opened by SickKids to provide communities in Ontario with greater access to community-based services for children and adolescents. For more information on virtual care services in Ontario to support neurodevelopmental physiotherapy, visit <a href="http://www.boomeranghealth.com/services/neural-development-children/">Boomerang Health</a> powered by SickKids.<br></p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Plagiocephaly_treatment_with_helmet.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Plagiocephaly_treatment_with_helmet.jpgplagiocephalytreatmentPositional plagiocephaly (baby flat-head): Treatment with a corrective helmet/cranial remolding orthosis (CRO)False