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Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)RRespiratory syncytial virus (RSV)Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)EnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Trachea;LungsTrachea;LungsConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Cough;Fever;Runny nose2013-10-29T04:00:00ZAndrea Riekstins, RN, MN, APN;Arlene Chaves, RN, MN, APN;Allan Coates, MD, CM;Brenda O'Doherty, RN;Krista Keilty-Lau, MN, APN;Marilyn Cranis, RN;Theo J Moraes, MD, PhD, FRCPC8.0000000000000062.00000000000001097.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>RSV is a virus that infects the lungs and airways and causes flu like symptoms. Read about what you can do to help prevent your child from getting RSV. </p><h2>What is respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)?</h2><p>Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects the lungs and airways. It causes colds and is the most common cause of <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=765&language=English">bronchiolitis</a> in young infants and toddlers. Most children will have an RSV infection by the age of two. Children are more likely to catch it during the RSV season, from November to April, when the virus is most active. Most children will have a mild infection and not require any medical attention.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title">Respiratory system</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Respiratory_system_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a virus. It is very common and causes mild symptoms in most infants and children. It can cause serious lung infections in some babies and children.</li><li>You can help prevent spreading the virus by regularly washing your hands, avoiding close contact with your baby if you are unwell, keeping your baby away from sick people.</li><li>If your baby is at high risk for serious lung infections, your baby will need treatment once a month during RSV season (November to April).</li><li>You can help by reminding your health-care provider that your baby needs the medicine. Use the tables to help you keep track.<br></li></ul><h2>Signs and symptoms caused by respiratory syncytial virus</h2><p>A baby or child with this infection may:</p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=774&language=English">cough</a></li><li>have a runny nose</li><li>have a <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a></li><li>sometimes wheeze</li></ul><p>Because these are common symptoms, it is easy to mistake RSV for the flu or another virus.</p><p>In most cases, you can take care of your child with RSV at home as long as they are breathing comfortably, their skin does not look blue and they are drinking and peeing as usual. The infection usually last a few days.</p><p>In healthy adults, RSV is often not serious. But adults can pass the virus to children.</p><h2>Respiratory syncytial virus can be serious</h2><p>Some babies and children can develop a severe form of RSV. This may be <a href="/Article?contentid=784&language=English">pneumonia</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=765&language=English">bronchiolitis</a>. These illnesses can be serious. Your child may need to visit your family doctor or paediatrician, or go to the emergency department.</p><h3>Your baby or child may have a higher risk of getting very ill from RSV if:</h3><ul><li>your baby was born prematurely (before 33 weeks of pregnancy) and is less than six months old when the RSV season starts in November.</li><li>your child is less than two years old and has certain lung conditions, congenital heart disease, <a href="/Article?contentid=9&language=English">Down syndrome</a> or has problems with their immune system. Your child's doctor will speak to you about this.</li><li>your child has other specific medical problems that your doctor will talk to you about.</li></ul><h2>Treatment of respiratory syncytial virus</h2><p>When a child is fighting RSV, treatment is mainly to relieve the symptoms. Antibiotics have no effect on viruses. They will not help your child get better faster.</p><h2>Babies at high risk need medicine during respiratory syncytial virus season</h2><p>No medicine can stop your baby from catching RSV and getting RSV once does not prevent infection. The average person may have an RSV infection multiple times during their lifetime.</p><p>There is no vaccine available for the general public yet. But there is one medicine that can help prevent RSV from becoming very serious and it is recommended for babies at high risk of serious RSV infection. Your health-care provider will decide if your child needs this medicine. The name of the medicine is <a href="/Article?contentid=208&language=English">palivizumab</a>. This treatment is sometimes called RSV prophylaxis (say: pro-full-AX-iss), which means prevention.</p><p>Palivizumab is given by a needle (injection) into a muscle. It does not interfere with normal childhood immunizations. This medicine works by giving your baby <a href="/Article?contentid=926&language=English">antibodies</a> that help fight an RSV infection. These antibodies help reduce the chances that an RSV infection will become severe.</p><p>A palivizumab dose works for about 30 days. This means that your child needs a dose of the medicine every month during RSV season. If you delay or skip the next appointment, the medicine stops working. Your child will no longer be protected against the virus.</p><h3>Reactions are rare</h3><p>The most common side effects of palivizumab are fever, rash or redness at the injection site. Serious allergic reactions are very rare. Ask your baby's doctor or nurse for the most recent information.</p><h3>Remind your baby's doctor or nurse if your baby needs medicine to prevent RSV</h3><p>Your baby can take the medicine in the hospital, the doctor's office or an RSV clinic. A doctor or a nurse can give it.</p><h3>To help your baby get the right treatment each month, you should:</h3><ul><li>Keep notes of the dates of the treatment. Use your baby's regular immunization card to keep track. You can also print out the tables below to help you keep track of your baby's treatment.</li><li>Remind your baby’s doctor or nurse that your baby needs the medicine once a month during RSV season.</li></ul><h2>RSV prophylaxis</h2><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Palivizumab</th><th>Date</th><th>Location</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Dose #1</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Dose #2</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Dose #3</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Dose #4</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Dose #5</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Dose #6</td><td></td><td></td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Positive tests for RSV and RSV hospitalizations</h2><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th> </th><th>Date</th><th>Date</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>RSV positive</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>RSV admission to hospital</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Discharged from hospital</td><td></td><td></td></tr></tbody></table><p>Visit the <a href="https://www.ontario.ca/page/get-full-coverage-certain-drugs#section-4" target="_blank">Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care website</a> to find more information about RSV prophylaxis.</p>
Virus respiratoire syncytial (VRS)VVirus respiratoire syncytial (VRS)Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)FrenchInfectious DiseasesChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Trachea;LungsImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Cough;Fever;Runny nose2013-10-29T04:00:00ZAndrea Riekstins, RN, MN, APN;Arlene Chaves, RN, MN, APN;Allan Coates, MD, CM;Brenda O'Doherty, RN;Krista Keilty-Lau, MN, APN;Marilyn Cranis, RN;Theo J Moraes, MD, PhD, FRCPC8.0000000000000062.00000000000001097.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Le VRS est un virus qui infecte les poumons et les voies respiratoires, et qui produit des symptômes semblables à ceux de la grippe. </p><h2>Qu'est-ce que le VRS?</h2><p>Le virus respiratoire syncytial (VRS) est un virus qui atteint les poumons et les voies respiratoires. Il provoque des rhumes et constitue la principale cause de la <a href="/Article?contentid=765&language=French">bronchiolite</a> chez les nourrissons et les bambins. La plupart des enfants auront contracté l’infection due au VRS avant d’atteindre l’âge de 2 ans. L’infection est plus répandue de novembre à avril, soit la période où le virus est le plus actif. Toutefois, la majorité des enfants auront une infection légère et n’auront pas besoin de soins médicaux. </p> <figure class="asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title">Système respiratoire</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Respiratory_system_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="" /> </figure><h2>À ret​enir</h2> <ul><li>Le VRS est un virus très répandu causant des infections pulmonaires dont les symptômes sont peu marqués chez la plupart des bébés et des enfants. Il peut toutefois causer des infections pulmonaires graves chez certains d’entre eux.</li> <li>Vous pouvez limiter ou prévenir la propagation du virus en vous lavant régulièrement les mains et en évitant tout contact direct avec votre bébé quand vous êtes vous même infecté ainsi que toute exposition de votre bébé à d’autres personnes infectées.</li> <li>Si votre bébé est fortement à risque de contracter des infections pulmonaires graves, il aura besoin d’une dose du médicament « palivizumab » tous les mois durant la saison du VRS (de novembre à avril).</li> <li>Vous pouvez vous assurer que votre bébé reçoive ce médicament en rappelant à votre fournisseur de soins de santé qu’il en a besoin ainsi qu’en en faisant le suivi des dates de rendez vous.</li></ul><h3>Symptômes de l’infection au VRS</h3> <p>Un bébé ou un enfant infecté peut :</p> <ul><li><a href="/Article?contentid=774&language=French">tousser</a>,</li> <li>présenter un écoulement du nez,</li> <li>avoir de la <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=French">fièvre</a>,</li> <li>présenter parfois une respiration sifflante.</li></ul> <p>Il est facile de confondre une infection au VRS avec une grippe ou une autre infection virale, car ils ont tous des symptômes en commun.</p> <p>Dans la plupart des cas, les parents peuvent eux mêmes s’occuper de leurs enfants infectés par le VRS tant que les petits ces derniers respirent aisément, que leur peau ne devient pas bleuâtre et qu’ils boivent et urinent (font pipi) normalement. L’infection ne dure généralement que quelques jours. Les adultes en santé ne sont généralement pas gravement infectés, mais ils peuvent tout de même transmettre le virus aux enfants.</p><h2>Les incidences de l’infection au VRS peuvent être gr​aves</h2> <p>Chez certains bébés et enfants, l’infection au VRS peut entraîner une <a href="/Article?contentid=784&language=French">pneumonie</a> ou une <a href="/Article?contentid=765&language=French">bronchiolite​</a> qui sont des maladies susceptibles d’être graves. Dans de telles situations, vous devrez peut-être amener votre enfant au cabinet de votre omnipraticien ou de votre pédiatre ou aux services d’urgence d’un hôpital.</p> <h3>Votre bébé ou votre enfant a potentiellement plus de risques d’être très malade à la suite d’une infection au VRS dans les cas suivants :</h3> <ul><li>Il est né prématurément (avant la 33e semaine de grossesse) et est âgé de moins de 6 mois au début de la saison du VRS, en novembre.</li> <li>Il est âgé de moins de 2 ans et est aux prises avec certains troubles pulmonaires, une cardiopathie congénitale, le syndrome de Down ou une affection du système immunitaire. Le médecin de votre enfant vous expliquera la situation.</li> <li>Il présente d’autres problèmes de santé particuliers dont vous parlera le médecin de votre enfant.</li></ul><h2>Traitem​ent</h2><p>Lorsqu’un enfant lutte contre une infection au VRS, le traitement consiste principalement à soulager les symptômes de l’infection. Comme les antibiotiques n’ont aucun effet sur les virus, ils ne peuvent pas accélérer la guérison de votre enfant.</p><h2>U​​n médicament est nécessaire aux bébés à risques élevés durant la saison du VRS</h2><p>Aucun médicament ne peut empêcher votre bébé d’être infecté par le VRS. De plus, le fait d’avoir eu une infection au VRS ne permet pas de l’immuniser par la suite. L’individu moyen peut avoir une infection au VRS à maintes reprises pendant sa vie.</p><p>Aucun vaccin contre le virus n’est encore disponible pour le grand public. Il existe néanmoins un médicament qui permet d’éviter que l’infection au VRS devienne très grave. Ce produit est recommandé pour les bébés risquant fortement une telle complication. Votre fournisseur de soins de santé déterminera si votre enfant a besoin de ce médicament appelé <a href="/Article?contentid=208&language=French">palivizumab</a> et dont le nom commercial est Synagis. On nomme parfois ce traitement prophylaxie anti VRS, ce qui veut dire  « traitement préventif contre le VRS ». Le palivizumab est donné sous forme injectable. La piqûre est habituellement administrée dans un muscle. Il n’y a aucune contre indication en ce qui concerne les vaccins habituels des enfants. Le médicament stimulera chez votre enfant la production d’anticorps qui permettront à son organisme de combattre une infection au VRS. Ces anticorps réduiront les risques que l’infection devienne grave.</p><p>Puisque l’efficacité d’une dose de palivizumab dure 30 jours environ, votre enfant devra obtenir une injection chaque mois au cours de la saison du VRS. Si vous remettez un rendez vous ou en sautez un, l’effet bénéfique du médicament aura pris fin et votre enfant n’aura plus de protection contre le virus.</p><h3>Les réactions sont ra​res</h3><p>Les effets secondaires les plus courants du palivizumab sont la fièvre, les éruptions cutanées ou la rougeur de la peau dans la zone d’injection. Les réactions graves dues aux allergies sont très rares. Demandez au médecin ou à l’infirmier prenant en charge votre enfant de vous fournir les renseignements à jour au sujet des réactions au médicament.</p><h3>Rappelez au médecin ou à l’infirmier responsable que votre bébé a besoin d’un médicament pour éviter une infection au VRS</h3><p>L’injection, qui peut se faire à l’hôpital, au cabinet du médecin, ou dans une clinique de traitement contre le VRS, peut être administrée par un médecin ou un infirmier.</p><h3>Pour vous assurer que votre bébé obtienne tous les mois le traitement approprié, vous devriez :</h3><ul><li>Consigner les dates des rendez vous. Pour faire un suivi, servez vous du carnet d’immunisation régulier ou imprimez les tableaux ci dessous.</li></ul><h2>Prophylaxie anti-VRS</h2><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Palivizumab</th><th>Date<br></th><th>Emplacement</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Dose #1</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Dose #2</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Dose #3</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Dose #4</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Dose #5</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Dose #6</td><td></td><td></td></tr></tbody></table><p></p><h2>Infection au VRS: résultats positifs aux tests et hospitalisations</h2><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th> </th><th> Date </th><th> Date </th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>VRS- positif</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>VRS admission à l'hôpital</td><td> </td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Congé de l'hôpital</td><td></td><td></td></tr></tbody></table><ul><li>Rappelez au médecin ou à l’infirmier responsable que votre bébé a besoin d’un médicament pour éviter une infection au VRS.</li></ul><p>Pour plus de renseignements au sujet de la prophylaxie anti VRS, consultez le site du <a href="https://www.ontario.ca/fr/page/obtenez-le-remboursement-integral-de-certains-medicaments" target="_blank">ministère de la santé de l'Ontario</a>.</p>

 

 

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)764.000000000000Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)REnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Trachea;LungsTrachea;LungsConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Cough;Fever;Runny nose2013-10-29T04:00:00ZAndrea Riekstins, RN, MN, APN;Arlene Chaves, RN, MN, APN;Allan Coates, MD, CM;Brenda O'Doherty, RN;Krista Keilty-Lau, MN, APN;Marilyn Cranis, RN;Theo J Moraes, MD, PhD, FRCPC8.0000000000000062.00000000000001097.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>RSV is a virus that infects the lungs and airways and causes flu like symptoms. Read about what you can do to help prevent your child from getting RSV. </p><h2>What is respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)?</h2><p>Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects the lungs and airways. It causes colds and is the most common cause of <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=765&language=English">bronchiolitis</a> in young infants and toddlers. Most children will have an RSV infection by the age of two. Children are more likely to catch it during the RSV season, from November to April, when the virus is most active. Most children will have a mild infection and not require any medical attention.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title">Respiratory system</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Respiratory_system_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a virus. It is very common and causes mild symptoms in most infants and children. It can cause serious lung infections in some babies and children.</li><li>You can help prevent spreading the virus by regularly washing your hands, avoiding close contact with your baby if you are unwell, keeping your baby away from sick people.</li><li>If your baby is at high risk for serious lung infections, your baby will need treatment once a month during RSV season (November to April).</li><li>You can help by reminding your health-care provider that your baby needs the medicine. Use the tables to help you keep track.<br></li></ul><h2>Signs and symptoms caused by respiratory syncytial virus</h2><p>A baby or child with this infection may:</p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=774&language=English">cough</a></li><li>have a runny nose</li><li>have a <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a></li><li>sometimes wheeze</li></ul><p>Because these are common symptoms, it is easy to mistake RSV for the flu or another virus.</p><p>In most cases, you can take care of your child with RSV at home as long as they are breathing comfortably, their skin does not look blue and they are drinking and peeing as usual. The infection usually last a few days.</p><p>In healthy adults, RSV is often not serious. But adults can pass the virus to children.</p><h2>Respiratory syncytial virus can be serious</h2><p>Some babies and children can develop a severe form of RSV. This may be <a href="/Article?contentid=784&language=English">pneumonia</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=765&language=English">bronchiolitis</a>. These illnesses can be serious. Your child may need to visit your family doctor or paediatrician, or go to the emergency department.</p><h3>Your baby or child may have a higher risk of getting very ill from RSV if:</h3><ul><li>your baby was born prematurely (before 33 weeks of pregnancy) and is less than six months old when the RSV season starts in November.</li><li>your child is less than two years old and has certain lung conditions, congenital heart disease, <a href="/Article?contentid=9&language=English">Down syndrome</a> or has problems with their immune system. Your child's doctor will speak to you about this.</li><li>your child has other specific medical problems that your doctor will talk to you about.</li></ul><h2>Respiratory syncytial virus can be spread by touching:</h2><ul><li>mucus from the nose or mouth of a person who has the virus</li><li>soiled tissues, surfaces, clothes and toys a person with the virus has touched</li><li>the unwashed hands of a person with the virus</li></ul><p>RSV can live on countertops and other hard objects for more than six hours. It can live on clothes and hands for up to one hour. After someone is exposed to RSV, it can take two to eight days before they become sick from the virus.</p><h2>Treatment of respiratory syncytial virus</h2><p>When a child is fighting RSV, treatment is mainly to relieve the symptoms. Antibiotics have no effect on viruses. They will not help your child get better faster.</p><h2>Babies at high risk need medicine during respiratory syncytial virus season</h2><p>No medicine can stop your baby from catching RSV and getting RSV once does not prevent infection. The average person may have an RSV infection multiple times during their lifetime.</p><p>There is no vaccine available for the general public yet. But there is one medicine that can help prevent RSV from becoming very serious and it is recommended for babies at high risk of serious RSV infection. Your health-care provider will decide if your child needs this medicine. The name of the medicine is <a href="/Article?contentid=208&language=English">palivizumab</a>. This treatment is sometimes called RSV prophylaxis (say: pro-full-AX-iss), which means prevention.</p><p>Palivizumab is given by a needle (injection) into a muscle. It does not interfere with normal childhood immunizations. This medicine works by giving your baby <a href="/Article?contentid=926&language=English">antibodies</a> that help fight an RSV infection. These antibodies help reduce the chances that an RSV infection will become severe.</p><p>A palivizumab dose works for about 30 days. This means that your child needs a dose of the medicine every month during RSV season. If you delay or skip the next appointment, the medicine stops working. Your child will no longer be protected against the virus.</p><h3>Reactions are rare</h3><p>The most common side effects of palivizumab are fever, rash or redness at the injection site. Serious allergic reactions are very rare. Ask your baby's doctor or nurse for the most recent information.</p><h3>Remind your baby's doctor or nurse if your baby needs medicine to prevent RSV</h3><p>Your baby can take the medicine in the hospital, the doctor's office or an RSV clinic. A doctor or a nurse can give it.</p><h3>To help your baby get the right treatment each month, you should:</h3><ul><li>Keep notes of the dates of the treatment. Use your baby's regular immunization card to keep track. You can also print out the tables below to help you keep track of your baby's treatment.</li><li>Remind your baby’s doctor or nurse that your baby needs the medicine once a month during RSV season.</li></ul><h2>RSV prophylaxis</h2><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Palivizumab</th><th>Date</th><th>Location</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Dose #1</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Dose #2</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Dose #3</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Dose #4</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Dose #5</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Dose #6</td><td></td><td></td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Positive tests for RSV and RSV hospitalizations</h2><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th> </th><th>Date</th><th>Date</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>RSV positive</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>RSV admission to hospital</td><td></td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Discharged from hospital</td><td></td><td></td></tr></tbody></table><p>Visit the <a href="https://www.ontario.ca/page/get-full-coverage-certain-drugs#section-4" target="_blank">Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care website</a> to find more information about RSV prophylaxis.</p><h2>Preventing respiratory syncytial virus</h2> <p>Do not expose your baby to cigarette smoke. Smoking has been associated with increased infection rates.</p> <p>You can help stop the spread of RSV by:</p> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=1981&language=English">washing your hands</a> with soap and water or by using alcohol-based hand sanitizer before and after touching your child. Ask others to do the same.</li> <li>coughing or sneezing into your sleeve instead of your hands and putting used tissue into the garbage right away.</li> <li>avoiding kissing or similar close contact with your baby's face and hands when you are unwell.</li> <li>staying away from your hospitalized premature baby if you are sneezing, coughing or have a runny nose or a fever.</li> <li>keeping your baby away from crowds and anyone with sneezing, coughing, a runny nose or a fever, especially during RSV season (from November to April). Infections spread more easily when there are more people around.</li> <li>cleaning surfaces in your home that are touched often on a regular basis, more often during RSV season.<br></li> </ul><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/respiratory_syncytial_virus.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/respiratory_syncytial_virus.jpgRSVRespiratory syncytial virus (RSV)False

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