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Urinary tract infectionUUrinary tract infectionUrinary tract infectionEnglishUrologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)UrethraUrethraConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Fever;Vomiting2014-11-25T05:00:00ZShawna Silver, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, PEng​8.0000000000000057.0000000000000841.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn how a urinary tract infection affects the bladder and kidneys and how it can be treated. </p><h2>What is a urinary tract infection?</h2><p>A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection of the <a href="https://pie.med.utoronto.ca/htbw/module.html?module=kidney-child">bladder or the kidneys</a>.</p><ul><li>A bladder infection is called cystitis.</li><li>A kidney infection is called pyelonephritis.</li></ul><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>UTIs occur when bacteria enter the bladder through the urethra.</li> <li>A urinary tract infection is diagnosed if there is a positive culture test.</li> <li>Antibiotics will treat the infection.</li> <li>If your child is aged under two years and has their first febrile UTI, they will need an ultrasound to look for kidney problems or severe urinary reflux.</li> <li>If your child has had one febrile UTI, they should be assessed for a possible UTI during an unexplained fever.</li> </ul><h2>Symptoms of a urinary tract infection</h2> <p>Symptoms of a urinary tract infection may include:</p> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a></li> <li>unexplained fussiness in a baby or young child</li> <li>needing to urinate (pee) more often</li> <li>pain or burning with urination</li> <li>wetting during the day in a toilet-trained child</li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> or abdominal (belly) pain</li> <li>back pain</li> <li>blood in the urine</li> </ul><h2>Causes of urinary tract infections</h2><p>UTIs occur when bacteria from the skin enter the bladder through the urethra (the tube that allows urine to leave the body from the bladder).</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title">Urinary </span><span class="asset-image-title"></span><span class="asset-image-title">system</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_urinary_system_V2_EN.png" alt="Location of kidney, ureter, bladder and urethra in a male and in a female" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"></figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> male and female urinary system are very similar, however the urethra in males is much longer than in females.</figcaption> </figure> <br><h2>How urinary tract infectionss are diagnosed</h2> <p>Your child’s doctor will diagnose a UTI through testing a sample of your child’s urine. Diagnosis involves three steps:</p> <ul> <li>testing the sample of urine with a dipstick</li> <li>studying the sample under a microscope</li> <li>growing a culture (bacteria) in the sample in a laboratory.</li> </ul> <h3>Urine sample</h3> <p>In toilet-trained children, the urine sample should be taken mid-stream. In children who are not toilet-trained, the urine sample can be collected by a “clean catch”, a catheter (tube) or, sometimes, a urine bag.</p> <h3>Results of urine test</h3> <p>The doctor will consider the results of the dipstick test and the culture test. If the urine sample has been collected properly, a “positive” culture confirms a urinary tract infection. A “negative” culture confirms that there is no infection.</p> <p>The final results of the urine culture test are usually ready in two or three days. The results will show which specific bacteria caused the infection and guide which antibiotics will treat them.</p> <p>If a child’s urine has been collected in a urine bag and there is a positive result from a dipstick test, your child’s doctor should collect another urine sample by clean catch or a catheter and send it for further testing.</p><h2>How to care for a child with a urinary tract infection</h2> <h3>Antibiotics</h3> <p>Depending on your child’s age, symptoms and medical history, they may require either oral <a href="/En/HealthAZ/TestsAndTreatments/GivingMedication/Pages/antibiotics.aspx">antibiotics</a> (antibiotics by mouth) or admission to hospital for intravenous antibiotics (antibiotics given into the vein).</p> <p>Your child’s doctor will first prescribe a broad spectrum antibiotic (one that can treat most bacteria). Once the doctor knows the bacteria that have caused the urinary tract infection, they will prescribe a more specific antibiotic if necessary. Your child will only get better when they take the correct antibiotic for their infection.</p> <p>Your child’s symptoms should improve within 48 hours of starting the correct antibiotic. Even so, continue to give the antibiotic to your child until it is finished. Finishing the antibiotic prevents the infection from returning and reduces the chance that your child will get an infection that is harder to treat with antibiotics in the future.</p> <h3>Pain and fever relief</h3> <p>Give your child <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a> to help with any <a href="/pain">pain</a> or fever. These medicines usually begin to work within an hour and do not interfere with antibiotics. You may need to give them during the first few days of treatment until the antibiotic starts to take effect.</p> <h3>Follow-up appointment</h3> <p>After your child starts antibiotics, make an appointment to see your child’s regular doctor. They can check how well the antibiotic is working and prescribe a different one if your child is still sick.</p> <h3>Other tests for children under two years</h3> <p>If your child has their first urinary tract infection with fever (known as a febrile UTI) before they turn two, they should have an <a href="/Article?contentid=1290&language=English">ultrasound</a> of their kidneys.</p> <p>They may also need to have a test called a <a href="/Article?contentid=1294&language=English">voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG)</a> to look for urinary reflux, a condition that causes the urine to flow backwards from the bladder to the ureters and kidneys. Whether they have this test depends on the results of the ultrasound and on whether they are young and have had more than one febrile UTI (a UTI with a fever).</p><h2>When to see a doctor about a UTI</h2> <p>Call your child’s doctor during office hours if your child’s symptoms last more than 48 hours after starting an antibiotic.</p> <p>Take your child to the nearest emergency department, or call 911, if your child:</p> <ul> <li>starts acting very sick or seems lethargic (very sleepy)</li> <li>complains of severe abdominal or back pain</li> <li>is vomiting (throwing up) repeatedly and cannot keep down any fluids or medicines.</li> </ul>
Infection des voies urinairesIInfection des voies urinairesUrinary tract infectionFrenchUrologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)UrethraUrethraConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Fever;Vomiting2014-11-25T05:00:00ZShawna Silver, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, PEng​8.0000000000000057.0000000000000841.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Les infections urinaires sont des infections bactériennes situées dans la vessie ou les reins. Lisez sur les causes, le diagnostic et le traitement des infections urinaires.</p><h2>Qu'est-ce qu’une infection des voies urinaires?</h2><p>Une infection des voies urinaires (IVU) (ou infection urinaire) est une infection <a href="https://pie.med.utoronto.ca/htbw/module.html?module=kidney-child">de la vessie ou des reins</a>.<br></p><ul><li>Une infection de la vessie s’appelle une « cystite ».</li><li>Une infection des reins porte le nom de « pyélonéphrite ».</li></ul><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Les IVU surviennent quand des bactéries pénètrent dans la vessie en passant par l’urètre.</li> <li>Une infection des voies urinaires est diagnostiquée lorsqu’une culture est positive.</li> <li>Le traitement antibiotique permet de tuer les bactéries</li> <li>Si votre enfant présente sa première IVU fébrile avant d’avoir atteint l’âge de deux ans, il doit passer une échographie des reins pour déceler tout trouble rénal ou un reflux urinaire grave.</li> <li>Si votre enfant a été atteint d’une IVU fébrile, on devrait évaluer la possibilité d’une IVU lorsqu’il présente une fièvre sans cause apparente.</li> </ul><p>Les symptômes d’une IVU peuvent comprendre les suivants :</p><ul><li> <a href="/article?contentid=30&language=French">fièvre,</a></li><li>irritabilité sans cause apparente chez un bébé ou un bambin,</li><li>besoin d’uriner plus souvent,</li><li>douleurs ou sensation de brûlure en urinant,</li><li>incontinence urinaire le jour chez un enfant propre,</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=French">vomissements</a> ou douleurs abdominales,</li><li>douleurs au dos,</li><li>présence de sang dans l’urine.</li></ul><h2>Causes des IVU</h2><p>Les IVU surviennent lorsque des bactéries sur la peau pénètrent dans la vessie en passant par l’urètre (canal permettant d’évacuer l’urine de la vessie hors du corps).<br></p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Système urinaire</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_urinary_system_V2_FR.png" alt="L’emplacement du rein, de l’uretère, de la vessie et de l’urètre dans un mâle et dans une femelle" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Même si les appareils urinaires des hommes et des femmes sont très similaires, chez les hommes, l’urètre est beaucoup plus long que chez les femmes.</figcaption> </figure><h2>Comment les IVU sont diagnostiquées</h2> <p>Le médecin diagnostiquera une IVU chez votre enfant par l’analyse d’un échantillon d’urine. Le diagnostic s’effectue en trois étapes :</p> <ul> <li>test à l’aide d’une bandelette réactive,</li> <li>examen au microscope,</li> <li>culture (croissance) en laboratoire de bactéries à partir de l'échantillon d’urine.</li> </ul> <h3>Échantillon d’urine</h3> <p>Chez les enfants propres, l’échantillon d’urine doit être obtenu « à mi-jet » (au milieu du jet). Chez les enfants qui n’ont pas acquis la propreté, l’urine peut être prélevée pendant la miction (évacuation de l’urine), au moyen d’un cathéter (tube) ou, parfois, d’une poche à urine.</p> <h3>Résultats de l’analyse de l’échantillon d’urine</h3> <p>Le médecin tiendra compte des résultats du test effectué au moyen de la bandelette réactive et de la culture. Si l’échantillon d’urine a été recueilli de façon appropriée, une culture « positive » confirme la présence d’une infection urinaire. Une culture « négative » confirme que l’enfant n’a pas d’infection.</p> <p>Les derniers résultats de la culture d’urine sont habituellement prêts au bout de deux ou trois jours. Ils révèlent quelle bactérie particulière est à l’origine de l’infection et permettront de déterminer le type d’antibiotiques nécessaire au traitement.</p> <p>Dans le cas d’un échantillon prélevé à l’aide d’une poche, si le résultat du test par bandelette réactive est positif, le médecin doit recueillir un autre échantillon pendant la miction (évacuation de l’urine) ou au moyen d’un cathéter et l’acheminer au laboratoire en vue de son analyse.</p><h2>Comment prendre soin d’un enfant atteint d’une IVU</h2><h3>Antibiotiques</h3><p>Selon l’âge de votre enfant, ses symptômes et ses antécédents médicaux, l’infection peut exiger soit la prise d'antibiotiques par voie orale (par la bouche) soit l’hospitalisation pour leur administration par voie veineuse.</p><p>Le médecin de votre enfant prescrira d’abord un antibiotique à large spectre (permettant de traiter la plupart des bactéries). Une fois qu’il saura quelle bactérie a causé l’lVU, il prescrira, au besoin, un antibiotique plus spécifique. L’infection ne sera supprimée que lorsque votre enfant prendra l’antibiotique approprié pour son infection.</p><p>Les symptômes de votre enfant devraient s’atténuer dans un délai de 48 heures après avoir commencé à lui donner l’antibiotique approprié. Même si votre enfant se porte mieux, assurez-vous d’effectuer le traitement antibiotique durant toute la période prescrite. Cela permettra de prévenir une rechute et de réduire le risque que votre enfant contracte éventuellement une infection plus difficile à traiter au moyen d’antibiotiques.</p><h3>Soulagement de la douleur et de la fièvre<br></h3><p>Donnez de l'<a href="/article?contentid=62&language=French">acétaminophène</a> ou de l'<a href="/article?contentid=153&language=French">ibuprofène</a> à votre enfant pour soulager la pain ou la fièvre. d’habitude, ces médicaments commencent à fonctionner dans un délai d'une heure et n’ont pas d’interaction avec les antibiotiques. il est possible que vous deviez les lui donner les premiers jours du traitement jusqu’à ce que les antibiotiques fassent effet.</p><h3>Rendez-vous de suivi</h3><p>après avoir commencé le traitement antibiotique, prenez un rendez-vous avec le médecin habituel de votre enfant. ce dernier déterminera si les antibiotiques donnent des résultats assez satisfaisants et en prescrira des différents si votre enfant est encore malade.</p><h3>Autres tests à l’intention des enfants de moins de deux ans</h3><p>Si votre enfant présente sa première infection urinaire accompagnée d’une fièvre (connue sous le nom d’ivu fébrile) avant d’avoir atteint l’âge de deux ans, il devra passer une <a href="/article?contentid=1290&language=French">échographie</a> des reins.</p><p>Il devra peut-être aussi subir un examen appelé <a href="/article?contentid=1294&language=French">cysto-urétrogramme pendant la miction (cug)</a> pour déceler un éventuel reflux urinaire. le reflux urinaire est une maladie caractérisée par un retour de l’urine dans l’urètre et les reins. ce test sera réalisé si les résultats de l’échographie le justifient et si votre enfant est jeune et a été atteint de plus d’une ivu fébrile.</p><h2>Quand consulter un médecin pour une IVU</h2> <p>Communiquez avec le médecin pendant les heures de bureau si les symptômes de votre enfant persistent plus de 48 heures après le début du traitement antibiotique.</p> <p>Amenez votre enfant au service des urgences le plus près :</p> <ul> <li>s’il devient très malade ou semble léthargique (très somnolent),</li> <li>s’il se plaint de douleurs intenses au ventre ou au dos,</li> <li>s’il vomit à répétition et ne peut garder aucun liquide ou médicament. </li> </ul>

 

 

Urinary tract infection935.000000000000Urinary tract infectionUrinary tract infectionUEnglishUrologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)UrethraUrethraConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Fever;Vomiting2014-11-25T05:00:00ZShawna Silver, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, PEng​8.0000000000000057.0000000000000841.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn how a urinary tract infection affects the bladder and kidneys and how it can be treated. </p><h2>What is a urinary tract infection?</h2><p>A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection of the <a href="https://pie.med.utoronto.ca/htbw/module.html?module=kidney-child">bladder or the kidneys</a>.</p><ul><li>A bladder infection is called cystitis.</li><li>A kidney infection is called pyelonephritis.</li></ul><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>UTIs occur when bacteria enter the bladder through the urethra.</li> <li>A urinary tract infection is diagnosed if there is a positive culture test.</li> <li>Antibiotics will treat the infection.</li> <li>If your child is aged under two years and has their first febrile UTI, they will need an ultrasound to look for kidney problems or severe urinary reflux.</li> <li>If your child has had one febrile UTI, they should be assessed for a possible UTI during an unexplained fever.</li> </ul><h2>Symptoms of a urinary tract infection</h2> <p>Symptoms of a urinary tract infection may include:</p> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a></li> <li>unexplained fussiness in a baby or young child</li> <li>needing to urinate (pee) more often</li> <li>pain or burning with urination</li> <li>wetting during the day in a toilet-trained child</li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> or abdominal (belly) pain</li> <li>back pain</li> <li>blood in the urine</li> </ul><h2>Causes of urinary tract infections</h2><p>UTIs occur when bacteria from the skin enter the bladder through the urethra (the tube that allows urine to leave the body from the bladder).</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title">Urinary </span><span class="asset-image-title"></span><span class="asset-image-title">system</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_urinary_system_V2_EN.png" alt="Location of kidney, ureter, bladder and urethra in a male and in a female" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"></figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> male and female urinary system are very similar, however the urethra in males is much longer than in females.</figcaption> </figure> <br><h2>How urinary tract infectionss are diagnosed</h2> <p>Your child’s doctor will diagnose a UTI through testing a sample of your child’s urine. Diagnosis involves three steps:</p> <ul> <li>testing the sample of urine with a dipstick</li> <li>studying the sample under a microscope</li> <li>growing a culture (bacteria) in the sample in a laboratory.</li> </ul> <h3>Urine sample</h3> <p>In toilet-trained children, the urine sample should be taken mid-stream. In children who are not toilet-trained, the urine sample can be collected by a “clean catch”, a catheter (tube) or, sometimes, a urine bag.</p> <h3>Results of urine test</h3> <p>The doctor will consider the results of the dipstick test and the culture test. If the urine sample has been collected properly, a “positive” culture confirms a urinary tract infection. A “negative” culture confirms that there is no infection.</p> <p>The final results of the urine culture test are usually ready in two or three days. The results will show which specific bacteria caused the infection and guide which antibiotics will treat them.</p> <p>If a child’s urine has been collected in a urine bag and there is a positive result from a dipstick test, your child’s doctor should collect another urine sample by clean catch or a catheter and send it for further testing.</p><h2>How to care for a child with a urinary tract infection</h2> <h3>Antibiotics</h3> <p>Depending on your child’s age, symptoms and medical history, they may require either oral <a href="/En/HealthAZ/TestsAndTreatments/GivingMedication/Pages/antibiotics.aspx">antibiotics</a> (antibiotics by mouth) or admission to hospital for intravenous antibiotics (antibiotics given into the vein).</p> <p>Your child’s doctor will first prescribe a broad spectrum antibiotic (one that can treat most bacteria). Once the doctor knows the bacteria that have caused the urinary tract infection, they will prescribe a more specific antibiotic if necessary. Your child will only get better when they take the correct antibiotic for their infection.</p> <p>Your child’s symptoms should improve within 48 hours of starting the correct antibiotic. Even so, continue to give the antibiotic to your child until it is finished. Finishing the antibiotic prevents the infection from returning and reduces the chance that your child will get an infection that is harder to treat with antibiotics in the future.</p> <h3>Pain and fever relief</h3> <p>Give your child <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a> to help with any <a href="/pain">pain</a> or fever. These medicines usually begin to work within an hour and do not interfere with antibiotics. You may need to give them during the first few days of treatment until the antibiotic starts to take effect.</p> <h3>Follow-up appointment</h3> <p>After your child starts antibiotics, make an appointment to see your child’s regular doctor. They can check how well the antibiotic is working and prescribe a different one if your child is still sick.</p> <h3>Other tests for children under two years</h3> <p>If your child has their first urinary tract infection with fever (known as a febrile UTI) before they turn two, they should have an <a href="/Article?contentid=1290&language=English">ultrasound</a> of their kidneys.</p> <p>They may also need to have a test called a <a href="/Article?contentid=1294&language=English">voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG)</a> to look for urinary reflux, a condition that causes the urine to flow backwards from the bladder to the ureters and kidneys. Whether they have this test depends on the results of the ultrasound and on whether they are young and have had more than one febrile UTI (a UTI with a fever).</p><h2>How to prevent a urinary tract infection</h2> <p>Most UTIs in young children are unavoidable. In an older child, you can help prevent a UTI by following the steps below.</p> <ul> <li>Teach your daughter to wipe from front to back after peeing. This is important after a bowel movement, as it helps to prevent bacteria in the stool from entering the urinary tract.</li> <li>Prevent your child from becoming constipated. <a href="/Article?contentid=6&language=English">Constipation</a> means having bowel movements that are harder or less frequent than normal. It can sometimes prevent the bladder from emptying completely, leading to UTIs.</li> <li>Encourage your child to drink plenty of liquids every day. Your child’s urine should be pale.</li> <li>Encourage your child to pee every two or three hours and not hold the pee for long periods.</li> <li>Some children with severe urinary reflux or other urinary tract abnormalities may need to take a low-dose antibiotic every day to prevent new infections.</li> </ul><h2>When to see a doctor about a UTI</h2> <p>Call your child’s doctor during office hours if your child’s symptoms last more than 48 hours after starting an antibiotic.</p> <p>Take your child to the nearest emergency department, or call 911, if your child:</p> <ul> <li>starts acting very sick or seems lethargic (very sleepy)</li> <li>complains of severe abdominal or back pain</li> <li>is vomiting (throwing up) repeatedly and cannot keep down any fluids or medicines.</li> </ul><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Urinary_tract_infection.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Urinary_tract_infection.jpgUTIUrinary tract infectionFalse

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