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Anaphylaxis: How to recognize and respond to a severe allergic reactionAAnaphylaxis: How to recognize and respond to a severe allergic reactionAnaphylaxis: How to recognize and respond to a severe allergic reactionEnglishAllergyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Abdominal pain;Cough;Diarrhea;Nausea;Vomiting;Rash2019-04-01T04:00:00ZVy​ Kim, MD, FRCPC;Anna Kasprzak, RN;Laura Umbrello, MD, FAAP9.0000000000000056.2000000000000822.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Anaphylaxis is a severe reaction to an allergen. Learn how to prevent and identify anaphylaxis and how to respond when someone has a reaction. </p><h2>What is anaphylaxis?</h2><p>Anaphylaxis is a severe <a href="/Article?contentid=804&language=English">allergic reaction</a> to certain substances called allergens. When an allergen enters the body of a child with an allergy, the child’s immune system treats it as an invader and overreacts. This reaction happens a few minutes to an hour after the child is exposed to an allergen and can be life threatening.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Anaphylaxis is a severe reaction to an allergen such as certain foods, medications and insect bites or stings.</li><li>Common symptoms of anaphylaxis include difficulty breathing, dizziness, hives, swelling of the face and vomiting. If left untreated, anaphylaxis can be life threatening.</li><li>If someone has anaphylaxis, call 911 or go to your nearest emergency department immediately.</li><li>If it is your child’s first episode of anaphylaxis, see an allergist for a full assessment. Your child should be prescribed an epinephrine injector, which they should carry with them at all times. <br></li></ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis</h2><p>The signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis may include sudden onset:</p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=789&language=English">hives</a>, itching, redness of the skin</li><li>swollen eyes, lips, tongue or face</li><li>difficulty breathing, throat constriction (tightening) or difficulty swallowing</li><li>abdominal (belly) pain, nausea, <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a></li><li>coughing</li><li>stuffy and/or runny nose, watery eyes, sneezing</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=779&language=English">fainting</a>, confusion, light-headedness or dizziness</li><li>rapid or irregular heartbeats</li><li>cold, clammy, sweaty skin </li><li>voice changes</li></ul><h2>Common causes of anaphylaxis</h2><p>Common allergens include foods, such as peanuts, tree nuts or eggs; insect bites or stings, such as bee stings, and drugs, such as penicillin.</p><p>An allergen can enter the body in different ways.</p><ul><li>A child may eat or inhale (breathe in) an allergen. It is best to speak to your child’s allergist about the inhaled allergens that would be a problem for your child, as not all of these allergens will cause a reaction.</li><li>A child might receive a medication via an injection that contains an allergen.</li></ul><p>When the body is exposed to an allergen, it releases chemicals called histamines. These and other chemicals released by the body cause the common signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis.</p><h2>Complications of anaphylaxis</h2><p>Anaphylaxis may cause tightening or blockage of your child’s airway, making it difficult for your child to breathe. It can also lead to a drop in blood pressure. These symptoms can lead to death if not treated.</p><h2>What you can do for your child during anaphylaxis</h2><p>Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency. If you suspect your child is having anaphylaxis, call 911 or go to the emergency department <strong>right away</strong>.</p><ul><li>If your child has an emergency anaphylaxis medication, such as an epinephrine auto-injector (EpiPen), inject it right away. You can give a second dose of epinephrine as early as five minutes after the first dose if there is no improvement in symptoms.</li><li>Call 911 or take your child to your nearest emergency department.</li><li>Calm and reassure your child and have them lie down.</li><li>Check your child's airway and breathing. Strained breathing or talking, a hoarse voice or high-pitched breathing sounds are all signs that your child's throat may be swollen.</li><li>Do not give any medication by mouth if your child is having trouble breathing.</li></ul><p>Because symptoms can disappear and then return within a few hours (even with treatment), a child with anaphylaxis will likely stay in the hospital for a period of observation after any anaphylactic reaction.</p><p>If this is your child’s first time having anaphylaxis, they should get a referral to an allergist for a full assessment. They should also receive a prescription for an epinephrine auto-injector.</p>
全身性過敏反應:如何識別和應對嚴重過敏反應全身性過敏反應:如何識別和應對嚴重過敏反應Anaphylaxis: How to recognize and respond to a severe allergic reactionChineseTraditionalAllergyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Abdominal pain;Cough;Diarrhea;Nausea;Vomiting;Rash2019-04-01T04:00:00ZVy​ Kim, MD, FRCPC;Anna Kasprzak, RN;Laura Umbrello, MD, FAAPFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>閱讀本文,瞭解如何預防和識別全身性過敏反應,以及在他人發病時如何作出反應。</p><h2>什麼是全身性過敏反應?</h2><p>全身性過敏反應是人體對某些物質(稱為過敏原)發生的嚴重<a href="/Article?contentid=804&language=ChineseTraditional">過敏反應</a>。一旦過敏原進入患有過敏症孩子的體內,免疫系統會將過敏原視為入侵物質,並發生過度反應。這種反應會在孩子接觸過敏原後的幾分鐘至一小時內出現,並且可能危及生命。</p><h2>要點</h2><ul><li>全身性過敏反應(anaphylaxis)是人體對過敏原(例如某些食物、藥物和昆蟲叮咬)發生的嚴重反應。</li><li>全身性過敏反應的常見症狀包括呼吸困難、暈眩、蕁麻疹、面部腫脹和嘔吐。如不及時治療,全身性過敏反應可能危及生命。</li><li>如有人出現全身性過敏反應,請立即撥打911或即刻前往最近的急診部。</li><li>如果這是您孩子第一次出現全身性過敏反應,應請過敏專科醫生為其進行全面評估。醫生應給孩子開具腎上腺素注射器,孩子應隨身攜帶該注射器。</li></ul>
全身性过敏反应:如何识别和应对严重过敏反应全身性过敏反应:如何识别和应对严重过敏反应Anaphylaxis: How to recognize and respond to a severe allergic reactionChineseSimplifiedAllergyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversAbdominal pain;Cough;Diarrhea;Nausea;Rash;Vomiting2019-04-01T04:00:00ZVy​ Kim, MD, FRCPC;Anna Kasprzak, RN;Laura Umbrello, MD, FAAPFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>阅读本文,了解如何预防和识别全身性过敏反应,以及在他人发病时如何作出反应。</p><h2>什么是全身性过敏反应?</h2><p>全身性过敏反应是人体对某些物质(称为过敏原)发生的严重<a href="/Article?contentid=804&language=ChineseSimplified">过敏反应</a>。一旦过敏原进入患有过敏症孩子的体内,免疫系统会将过敏原视为入侵物质,并发生过度反应。这种反应会在孩子接触过敏原后的几分钟至一小时内出现,并且可能危及生命。</p><h2>要点</h2><ul><li>全身性过敏反应(anaphylaxis)是人体对过敏原(例如某些食物、药物和昆虫叮咬)发生的严重反应。</li><li>全身性过敏反应的常见症状包括呼吸困难、晕眩、荨麻疹、面部肿胀和呕吐。如不及时治疗,全身性过敏反应可能危及生命。</li><li>如有人出现全身性过敏反应,请立即拨打911或即刻前往最近的急诊部。</li><li>如果这是您孩子第一次出现全身性过敏反应,应请过敏专科医生为其进行全面评估。医生应给孩子开具肾上腺素注射器,孩子应随身携带该注射器。<br></li></ul>

 

 

Anaphylaxis: How to recognize and respond to a severe allergic reaction781.000000000000Anaphylaxis: How to recognize and respond to a severe allergic reactionAnaphylaxis: How to recognize and respond to a severe allergic reactionAEnglishAllergyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Abdominal pain;Cough;Diarrhea;Nausea;Vomiting;Rash2019-04-01T04:00:00ZVy​ Kim, MD, FRCPC;Anna Kasprzak, RN;Laura Umbrello, MD, FAAP9.0000000000000056.2000000000000822.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Anaphylaxis is a severe reaction to an allergen. Learn how to prevent and identify anaphylaxis and how to respond when someone has a reaction. </p><h2>What is anaphylaxis?</h2><p>Anaphylaxis is a severe <a href="/Article?contentid=804&language=English">allergic reaction</a> to certain substances called allergens. When an allergen enters the body of a child with an allergy, the child’s immune system treats it as an invader and overreacts. This reaction happens a few minutes to an hour after the child is exposed to an allergen and can be life threatening.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Anaphylaxis is a severe reaction to an allergen such as certain foods, medications and insect bites or stings.</li><li>Common symptoms of anaphylaxis include difficulty breathing, dizziness, hives, swelling of the face and vomiting. If left untreated, anaphylaxis can be life threatening.</li><li>If someone has anaphylaxis, call 911 or go to your nearest emergency department immediately.</li><li>If it is your child’s first episode of anaphylaxis, see an allergist for a full assessment. Your child should be prescribed an epinephrine injector, which they should carry with them at all times. <br></li></ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis</h2><p>The signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis may include sudden onset:</p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=789&language=English">hives</a>, itching, redness of the skin</li><li>swollen eyes, lips, tongue or face</li><li>difficulty breathing, throat constriction (tightening) or difficulty swallowing</li><li>abdominal (belly) pain, nausea, <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a></li><li>coughing</li><li>stuffy and/or runny nose, watery eyes, sneezing</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=779&language=English">fainting</a>, confusion, light-headedness or dizziness</li><li>rapid or irregular heartbeats</li><li>cold, clammy, sweaty skin </li><li>voice changes</li></ul><h2>Common causes of anaphylaxis</h2><p>Common allergens include foods, such as peanuts, tree nuts or eggs; insect bites or stings, such as bee stings, and drugs, such as penicillin.</p><p>An allergen can enter the body in different ways.</p><ul><li>A child may eat or inhale (breathe in) an allergen. It is best to speak to your child’s allergist about the inhaled allergens that would be a problem for your child, as not all of these allergens will cause a reaction.</li><li>A child might receive a medication via an injection that contains an allergen.</li></ul><p>When the body is exposed to an allergen, it releases chemicals called histamines. These and other chemicals released by the body cause the common signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis.</p><h2>Complications of anaphylaxis</h2><p>Anaphylaxis may cause tightening or blockage of your child’s airway, making it difficult for your child to breathe. It can also lead to a drop in blood pressure. These symptoms can lead to death if not treated.</p><h2>How to prevent repeated episodes of anaphylaxis</h2><p>The best way to prevent anaphylaxis is for your child to avoid any known allergens. Many people are not aware of an allergy until they are exposed to an allergen and have an anaphylactic reaction.</p><p>Following their first episode of anaphylaxis, your child should see an allergist. This is a doctor who specializes in diagnosing and treating allergies.</p><p>The allergist will try to figure out the allergen responsible for your child’s anaphylaxis and may also prescribe an <a href="/article?contentid=130&language=English">epinephrine</a> auto-injector such as EpiPen. Your child should carry this medication with them at all times in case of an emergency. Ideally, your child will carry one injector and a second will be readily available nearby.</p><p>Your child should also wear a <a href="https://www.medicalert.ca/">MedicAlert</a> or similar bracelet that indicates their allergies. Talk to your child’s school or daycare about creating an anaphylaxis emergency plan for your child.</p><h2>What you can do for your child during anaphylaxis</h2><p>Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency. If you suspect your child is having anaphylaxis, call 911 or go to the emergency department <strong>right away</strong>.</p><ul><li>If your child has an emergency anaphylaxis medication, such as an epinephrine auto-injector (EpiPen), inject it right away. You can give a second dose of epinephrine as early as five minutes after the first dose if there is no improvement in symptoms.</li><li>Call 911 or take your child to your nearest emergency department.</li><li>Calm and reassure your child and have them lie down.</li><li>Check your child's airway and breathing. Strained breathing or talking, a hoarse voice or high-pitched breathing sounds are all signs that your child's throat may be swollen.</li><li>Do not give any medication by mouth if your child is having trouble breathing.</li></ul><p>Because symptoms can disappear and then return within a few hours (even with treatment), a child with anaphylaxis will likely stay in the hospital for a period of observation after any anaphylactic reaction.</p><p>If this is your child’s first time having anaphylaxis, they should get a referral to an allergist for a full assessment. They should also receive a prescription for an epinephrine auto-injector.</p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/anaphylaxis.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/anaphylaxis.jpganaphylaxisAnaphylaxis: How to recognize and respond to a severe allergic reactionFalseAnaphylaxis

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