AboutKidsHealth

 

 

Safe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving injectable medicine by mouthSSafe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving injectable medicine by mouthSafe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving injectable medicine by mouthEnglishPharmacyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANADrug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-10-22T04:00:00Z7.4000000000000067.50000000000001589.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>A guide on preparing and giving injectable hazardous medicine safely by mouth.</p><p>If your child's hazardous medicine comes in an injectable form that can be given by mouth using an oral syringe or a cup, follow these instructions.</p><h2>What is hazardous medicine?</h2><p>Hazardous medicines are used to treat a variety of medical conditions. For example, chemotherapy is used to treat cancer, and immunosuppressants are used to prevent organ rejection after a transplant.</p><p>Hazardous medicine can damage healthy cells. Anyone handling hazardous medicine should keep themselves protected.</p><p>Although the risk of harm from handling hazardous medicine is small, it is a good idea to avoid exposure. This includes not tasting your child’s medicine. If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, it is best to avoid contact with hazardous medicine. If possible, have someone else prepare and give your child their medicine.</p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/E6kjz_As-XU"></iframe> </div><p>For more videos on how to safely handle hazardous medicines, please view the <a href="https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjJtOP3StIuWBtC0ID5BCbZCMVHJvTcdr">Safe Handling</a> playlist.<br></p><p><strong>Please consider completing this </strong><a href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=WDWRRWMCW3&utm_source=AKHWebsite&utm_medium=AKHWebsite&utm_campaign=2021SHSurvey"><strong>brief survey</strong></a><strong> to provide feedback on these safe handling videos to help us make improvements that would benefit patients and caregivers.</strong><br></p> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A gown, mask and gloves offer protection when handling hazardous medicine.</li><li>To remove the injectable hazardous medicine from the vial, you need to use a vial access device (spike) and a syringe.</li><li>You can dilute the injectable medicine using an approved drink.</li><li>Use a new vial spike for each new vial of medicine that you use.<br></li></ul><p><strong>After reviewing the content on this page, please consider completing this </strong><a href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=WDWRRWMCW3&utm_source=AKHWebsite&utm_medium=AKHWebsite&utm_campaign=2021SHSurvey"><strong>brief survey</strong></a><strong> to provide feedback on these safe handling videos to help us make improvements that would benefit patients and caregivers.</strong><br></p><h2>Giving the medicine</h2><ol><li><p>If your child’s medicine is suitable to be mixed with liquids, put some of the drink into the medicine cup and set aside. You will need to add at least an equal amount of the drink to improve how the medicine tastes.</p><p>Only some medicines can be mixed with liquids. Your child’s health-care provider will tell you if you can do this with your child’s medicine. Ask your health-care provider which drink is suitable to mix with the medicine.</p></li><li>Remove the plastic cap from the vial and place the vial upright on your work surface.</li><li>Remove the vial spike from its packaging and take the protective cover off of the spike. </li><li>Making sure the vial is upright, align the spike with the centre of the vial closure. Keep the spike straight and push it down firmly into the vial until the spike passes through the rubber stopper and the plastic "skirt" snaps onto the vial.</li><li>Remove the syringe from its packaging. Attach the syringe to the top of the vial spike by pushing and twisting until secure. Turn the vial upside down and pull back the syringe plunger slowly to draw out the required dose. Your child’s health-care provider will tell you the required dose. If you need to push medicine back into the vial, turn the vial upright before doing so. </li><li>Remove the syringe from the vial spike. You are now ready to mix the medicine.</li><li>To give the injectable medicine by mouth you can dilute it in the syringe or mix it with the drink.</li><p><strong>Diluting the medicine in the syringe</strong></p><ol type="a"><li><p>Draw some of the drink from the medicine cup into the syringe with the medicine and give it to your child. Whatever amount of medicine your child needs, you will need to add at least an equal amount of the drink to improve how the medicine tastes.</p><p>For example, if your child’s dose is 5 mL, you will need to add at least 5 mL of the drink. You can add more of the drink to the syringe if needed.</p></li><li>Place the syringe into your child’s mouth, and slowly push the plunger to release the drink and medicine solution.</li></ol><p><strong>Mixing the medicine with the drink</strong></p><ol type="a"><li>If your child is unable to take their medicine from a syringe, you can dilute it with the drink in the cup instead. Push the medicine from the syringe into the cup with the drink.</li><li>Stir with the syringe to mix the medicine and the drink together.</li><li>Have your child drink from the cup, making sure they finish all the liquid in the cup. You may give them more of the drink afterwards.</li></ol><li>Once you are done, place the syringe into a container for disposal. You will use a new syringe every time you prepare a dose.</li><li>The vial spike can remain in the medicine vial and can be used for other doses. Your child’s health-care provider will inform you how long you can use the medicine vial once it is opened.</li></ol><p>Store the vial upright, in a cool, dry place, protected from light. Use a new vial spike for each new medicine vial that you use. Discard the empty vial and the used vial spikes into the disposal container.</p><p>Speak to your health-care provider if your child is having trouble taking the medicine.</p><h3>While preparing your child’s medicine, please remember:</h3><ul><li>Use the oral syringe to give the hazardous medicine only. Do not use them for other medicines.</li></ul> <h2>Clean-up and storage of hazardous medicines</h2><p>Hazardous medicines should be handled safely. It is important to carefully handle the clean-up of the supplies and work area, and to dispose of wastes properly.</p><p>Remember these key tips for safe handling of hazardous medicines at home.</p><ul><li>If possible, avoid contact with hazardous medicines if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.</li><li>You and your child should wash your hands before and after handling hazardous medicines.</li><li>Wear gloves when handling hazardous medicine tablets, capsules, or liquids.</li><li>Properly clean, dispose or store the equipment and hazardous medicine.</li></ul><p>All disposable items that have been in contact with hazardous medicines, such as used paper towels and gloves, must go into a designated plastic waste bag or container. Contact the Household Hazardous Waste Depot in your neighbourhood to see if they will accept the waste bags or containers. If such a service does not exist in your area, ask a member of your child's health-care team about other options.</p><p>You may wash and reuse some of your supplies, but do not rinse them in the kitchen sink over other dishes or utensils.</p><p>If you are reusing an item, such as the medicine cup, rinse it with warm soapy water and allow it to air dry. Clean the sink after washing your supplies.</p><p>Always store hazardous medicines away from children and pets. If stored at room temperature, place them in a locked box, away from moisture and direct sunlight, and in a cool, dry place. If the medicine needs refrigeration, place it in a separate container at the back of the fridge. Return the medicine to the locked box or fridge after each use. Do not keep any medicine in your purse, knapsack or diaper bag.</p><h3>Take special precautions with your child's waste (vomit, urine and stool) while they are taking hazardous medicine</h3><p>While your child is taking hazardous medicine, some of the drug is broken down and removed from the body through urine and stool. It may also appear in vomit. It is important that you protect yourself and others from hazardous medicine in your child's urine, stool or vomit by following these guidelines:</p><ul><li>When changing your child’s diaper, wear disposable gloves and place diapers in a sealed plastic bag before disposal.</li><li>If your child is toilet trained, have your child close the lid, to avoid splashes, and flush twice after using the toilet. Always make sure they wash their hands afterwards.</li><li>Have supplies ready in case you need to quickly clean up any accident. You need a paper towel, soap and water, disposable gloves, and a disposable container, such as an empty ice cream container.</li><li>Use a plastic mattress cover to protect the mattress from accidents.</li><li>Keep a plastic container close by in case of vomiting. If you use the container, empty the contents into the toilet and wash with warm soapy water.</li><li>Wear disposable gloves when you are handling any bodily wastes, such as changing soiled sheets or cleaning up vomit.</li><li>Wash soiled clothes or sheets separately from other laundry. If they cannot be washed right away, place them in a sealed plastic bag and set it aside.</li><li>Once you are all finished, wash your hands.<br></li></ul><p> <strong>Please consider completing this </strong><a href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=WDWRRWMCW3&utm_source=AKHWebsite&utm_medium=AKHWebsite&utm_campaign=2021SHSurvey"><strong>brief survey</strong></a><strong> to provide feedback on the above safe handling videos to help us make improvements that would benefit patients and caregivers.</strong><br></p><h2>Preparing the space</h2><p>You will need to gather certain supplies and take careful steps when setting up your work area. Your child’s health-care provider will help you make a list of the supplies you will need. You can buy these materials at a grocery or drug store.</p><p>To handle your child’s hazardous medicine at home, choose an uncluttered counter or table away from windows, fans, vents, areas where you prepare food, and where children and pets play.</p><p>If you are giving your child their injectable medicine by mouth, a gown, mask and gloves offer protection. Other supplies will include:</p><ul><li>paper towels or a disposable, absorbent plastic-backed mat — to contain any spills</li><li>medicine vial</li><li>a syringe — to draw up medicine from the vial</li><li>a vial access device (vial spike) — to allow safe removal of medicine from the vial</li><li>a container with a lid or plastic bag — for disposal of the syringe, vial and spike</li><li>a suitable drink. Your child’s health-care provider will tell you which drinks are suitable</li><li>a labelled container — to place any unused mixed medicine</li><li>a medicine cup or labelled cup — used only for giving the medicine</li></ul><h2>Giving your child the injectable medicine by mouth</h2><p>Always prepare the medicine right before your child will take it. Never prepare and store the dose ahead of time.</p><p>Before giving your child their medicine:</p> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/chemo_at_home_general_wash_hands_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="handwashing at sink" /> </figure><figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/chemo_at_home_general_protect_yourself_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Person wearing gloves, a gown, and a mask over the nose and mouth" /></figure> <ul><li>Wash your hands with soap and water.</li><li>Put on your gloves, gown and mask.</li><li>Place paper towels or a disposable, absorbent plastic-backed mat over your work surface.</li></ul>
如何在家安全处理危险性药物:注射剂的口服如何在家安全处理危险性药物:注射剂的口服Safe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving injectable medicine by mouthChineseSimplifiedPharmacyBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANADrug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2019-03-29T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>制备和口服危险性注射剂的安全指南</p><p>如果您孩子的注射剂可使用口腔注射器或喂药杯进行给药,请遵循以下说明。</p><h2>关键点</h2><ul><li>处理危险性药物时,罩衣、口罩和手套可提供保护。</li><li>从药瓶中取出危险性注射剂,您需要一个药瓶接入装置(针头)和一个注射器。</li><li>您可以使用经医疗服务人员批准的饮料来稀释注射剂。</li><li>每开一个新的药瓶,应使用一个新的针头。</li></ul>
التعامل الآمن مع الأدوية الخطرة في المنزل: إعطاء الأدوية القابلة للحقن عن طريق الفماالتعامل الآمن مع الأدوية الخطرة في المنزل: إعطاء الأدوية القابلة للحقن عن طريق الفمSafe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving injectable medicine by mouthArabicPharmacyBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANADrug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2019-03-29T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>دليل إعداد الأدوية الخطرة القابلة للحقن وإعطاؤها عن طريق الفم.</p><p>إذا كان الدواء الخطير لطفلك يأتي في شكل دواء قابل للحقن يمكن إعطاؤه عن طريق الفم باستخدام محقن فموي أو كوب، فاتبع هذه التعليمات،</p><h2>النقاط الرئيسية</h2><ul><li>يوفر ارتداء الثوب الطبي الواقي والقفازات الحماية اللازمة عند التعامل مع الأدوية الخطرة</li><li>لإزالة الأدوية الخطرة القابلة للحقن من القارورة، ستحتاج إلى جهاز الوصول إلى القارورة (عتلة) وإلى محقن.</li><li>بإمكانك تخفيف الدواء القابل للحقن باستخدام سائل معتمد.</li><li>استخدم عتلة قارورة جديدة لكل قارورة جديدة من الدواء.</li></ul>
Manipulation sécuritaire des médicaments dangereux à domicile : comment administrer un médicament injectable par voie oraleMManipulation sécuritaire des médicaments dangereux à domicile : comment administrer un médicament injectable par voie orale Safe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving injectable medicine by mouthFrenchPharmacyBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANADrug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2019-03-29T04:00:00Z472.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Comment préparer et administrer des médicaments dangereux injectables par voie orale en toute sécurité.</p><p>Si le médicament dangereux de votre enfant se présente sous une forme injectable pouvant être administrée par voie orale à l’aide d’une seringue pour administration orale ou d’un gobelet, suivez ces instructions.</p><h2>Qu’est-ce qu’un médicament dangereux?</h2><p>Les médicaments dangereux sont utilisés pour traiter une variété de problèmes de santé. Par exemple, la chimiothérapie est utilisée dans le traitement du cancer, alors que les immunosuppresseurs contribuent à prévenir le rejet d’organe après une transplantation.</p><p>Les médicaments dangereux peuvent causer des lésions sur les cellules saines. Il est important de se protéger lors de la manipulation de médicaments dangereux.</p><p>Même si le risque de dommage causé par la manipulation de médicaments dangereux est minime, il est recommandé d’éviter l’exposition. Il s’agit notamment d’éviter de goûter les médicaments de votre enfant. Si vous êtes enceinte ou si vous allaitez, il est préférable d’éviter tout contact avec des médicaments dangereux. Dans la mesure du possible, demandez à quelqu’un d’autre d’administrer les médicaments à votre enfant.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Le port d’une blouse, d’un masque et des gants permet de se protéger lors de la manipulation de médicaments dangereux.</li><li>Pour retirer le médicament dangereux injectable du flacon, vous aurez besoin d’un dispositif permettant l’accès au flacon (pointe) et d’une seringue.</li><li>Vous pouvez diluer le médicament injectable en utilisant une boisson approuvée.</li><li>Utilisez une nouvelle pointe pour chaque nouveau flacon de médicaments que vous utilisez.</li></ul><h2>Comment administrer le médicament</h2><ol><li><p>Si le médicament de votre enfant peut être mélangé avec des liquides, versez une partie de la boisson dans le gobelet à médicaments et mettez-le de côté. Vous devrez ajouter au moins une quantité égale de boisson pour améliorer le goût du médicament.</p><p>Seuls certains médicaments peuvent être mélangés avec des liquides. Le fournisseur de soins de santé de votre enfant vous dira si vous pouvez mélanger les médicaments de l’enfant avec des liquides. Demandez à votre fournisseur de soins de santé quelle boisson peut être mélangée avec le médicament.</p></li><li>Retirez le bouchon en plastique du flacon et placez le flacon à la verticale sur votre surface de travail.</li><li>Retirez la pointe pour flacon de son emballage et retirez le couvercle de protection de la pointe.</li><li>Assurez-vous que le flacon est bien droit, alignez la pointe avec le centre du bouchon du flacon. Maintenez la pointe droite et poussez-la fermement dans le flacon jusqu’à ce que la pointe passe à travers le bouchon en caoutchouc et que la bordure en plastique s’enclenche sur le flacon.</li><li>Retirez la seringue de son emballage. Fixez la seringue au-dessus de la pointe du flacon en poussant et en tournant jusqu’à ce qu’elle soit bien fixée. Retournez le flacon et tirez lentement le piston de la seringue pour prélever la dose requise. Le fournisseur de soins de santé de votre enfant vous indiquera la dose requise. Si vous devez remettre le médicament dans le flacon, retournez le flacon à la verticale avant de le faire. </li><li>Retirez la seringue de la pointe. Vous êtes maintenant prêt à mélanger le médicament.</li><li>Pour administrer le médicament injectable par voie orale, vous pouvez le diluer dans la seringue ou le mélanger avec la boisson.</li><p> <strong>Comment diluer le médicament dans la seringue</strong></p><ol type="a"><li><p>Mettez une partie de la boisson qui se trouve dans le gobelet à médicaments dans la seringue contenant le médicament et donnez-la à votre enfant. Quelle que soit la quantité de médicament dont votre enfant a besoin, vous devrez ajouter au moins une quantité égale de boisson pour améliorer le goût du médicament.</p><p>Par exemple, si la dose de votre enfant est de 5 ml, vous aurez besoin d’au moins 5 ml de boisson pour diluer le médicament. Vous pouvez ajouter plus de boisson dans la seringue si vous le désirez.</p></li><li>Placez la seringue dans la bouche de votre enfant et poussez lentement le piston pour libérer le médicament mélangé.</li></ol><p> <strong>Comment mélanger le médicament avec la boisson</strong></p><ol type="a"><li>Si votre enfant est incapable de prendre son médicament dans une seringue, vous pouvez le diluer avec la boisson dans le gobelet. Poussez le médicament de la seringue dans le gobelet contenant la boisson.</li><li>Remuez avec la seringue pour mélanger le médicament et la boisson.</li><li>Veillez à ce que votre enfant boive tout le contenu du gobelet. Vous pouvez lui donner plus de boisson par la suite.</li></ol><li>Une fois que vous avez terminé, placez la seringue dans un contenant à déchets. Vous utiliserez une nouvelle seringue chaque fois que vous préparerez une dose.</li><li>La pointe du flacon peut rester dans le flacon de médicaments et peut être utilisée dans la préparation des autres doses. Le fournisseur de soins de santé de votre enfant vous indiquera pendant combien de temps vous pouvez conserver le flacon de médicaments une fois qu’il est ouvert.</li></ol><p>Conservez le flacon à la verticale, dans un endroit frais et sec, à l’abri de la lumière. Utilisez une nouvelle pointe pour chaque nouveau flacon de médicaments que vous utilisez. Jetez le flacon vide et les pointes de flacon usagées dans le contenant à déchets.</p><p>Demandez conseil à votre fournisseur de soins de santé si votre enfant a de la difficulté à prendre le médicament.</p><h3>Lors de la préparation des médicaments de votre enfant, pensez à :</h3><ul><li>Utiliser la seringue pour administration orale uniquement pour administrer les médicaments dangereux. Ne pas l’utiliser pour d’autres médicaments.</li></ul><h2>Nettoyage et stockage des médicaments dangereux</h2><p>Les médicaments dangereux doivent être manipulés de façon sécuritaire. Il est important de nettoyer soigneusement les accessoires et la zone de travail, et d’éliminer correctement les déchets.</p><p>Gardez bien à l’esprit ces conseils essentiels pour une manipulation sécuritaire des médicaments dangereux à domicile.</p><ul><li>Dans la mesure du possible, évitez tout contact avec des médicaments dangereux si vous êtes enceinte ou si vous allaitez.</li><li>Vous et votre enfant devez vous laver les mains avant et après avoir manipulé des médicaments dangereux.</li><li>Portez des gants lorsque vous manipulez des médicaments dangereux sous forme de comprimé, de capsule ou de liquide.</li><li>Nettoyez, éliminez ou stockez correctement les accessoires et les médicaments dangereux.</li></ul><p>Tous les articles jetables qui ont été en contact avec des médicaments dangereux, tels que le papier essuie‑tout et les gants usagés, doivent être placés dans un sac ou dans une poubelle en plastique désignée. Contactez le centre de récupération des déchets ménagers dangereux de votre quartier pour voir s’il acceptera vos sacs ou récipients à déchets. Si ce service n’existe pas dans votre région, informez-vous auprès de l’un des membres de l’équipe soignante de votre enfant au sujet de vos options.</p><p>Vous pouvez laver et réutiliser certains de vos accessoires, mais ne les rincez pas dans l’évier de la cuisine au-dessus d’autres plats ou ustensiles. Si vous réutilisez un article, comme le gobelet à médicaments, rincez-le à l’eau chaude savonneuse et laissez-le sécher à l’air. Nettoyez l’évier après avoir lavé vos accessoires.</p><p>Conservez toujours les médicaments dangereux hors de la portée des enfants et des animaux de compagnie. S’ils sont conservés à température ambiante, placez-les dans une boîte verrouillée, à l’abri de l’humidité et de la lumière directe du soleil, et dans un endroit frais et sec. Si le médicament doit être conservé dans un réfrigérateur, placez-le dans un contenant distinct à l’arrière du réfrigérateur. Rangez le médicament dans la boîte verrouillée dans le réfrigérateur après chaque utilisation. Ne conservez pas les médicaments dans votre sac à main, votre sac à dos ou sac à couches.</p><h3>Prenez des précautions particulières concernant les déchets de votre enfant (vomi, urine et selles) pendant qu’il prend des médicaments dangereux</h3><p>Lorsque votre enfant prend des médicaments dangereux, une partie de ces médicaments est décomposée et éliminée de l’organisme par l’urine et les selles. Le médicament peut également se retrouver dans son vomi. Il est important de vous protéger, vous et les autres, des médicaments dangereux présents dans l’urine, les selles ou le vomi de votre enfant en respectant les directives suivantes :</p><ul><li>Lorsque vous changez la couche de votre enfant, portez des gants jetables et placez les couches sales dans un sac en plastique scellé avant de les jeter.</li><li>Si votre enfant a appris la propreté, demandez-lui de fermer le couvercle pour éviter les éclaboussures et de tirer deux fois la chasse d’eau après avoir utilisé les toilettes. Veillez toujours à ce qu’il se lave les mains après.</li><li>Ayez les fournitures nécessaires au cas où vous devriez nettoyer rapidement un accident. Vous avez besoin d’essuie-tout, de savon et d’eau, de gants jetables et d’un grand contenant jetable, comme un pot de crème glacée vide.</li><li>Utilisez un couvre-matelas en plastique pour protéger le matelas en cas d’accident.</li><li>Ayez un contenant en plastique à portée de la main en cas de vomissements. Si vous utilisez le contenant, videz-le contenu dans la cuvette de la toilette et nettoyez-le avec de l’eau savonneuse tiède.</li><li>Portez des gants jetables lorsque vous manipulez des déchets de l’organisme, comme lorsque vous changez des draps souillés ou nettoyez des vomissements.</li><li>Nettoyez les vêtements ou les draps souillés séparément dans le lave-linge une première fois, puis nettoyez-les de nouveau. S’il n’est pas possible de les nettoyer immédiatement, placez les dans un sac en plastique scellé et mettez-les de côté.</li><li>Une fois que vous avez fini, lavez-vous les mains.</li></ul><h2>Préparation de l’espace</h2><p>Il vous faudra rassembler certains articles et adopter des mesures prudentes lors de la préparation de votre espace de travail. Le fournisseur de soins de santé de votre enfant vous aidera à dresser une liste des accessoires dont vous aurez besoin. Vous pouvez les acheter dans une épicerie ou une pharmacie.</p><p>Pour manipuler les médicaments dangereux de votre enfant à la maison, choisissez un comptoir ou une table vide et loin des fenêtres, des ventilateurs, des évents, des zones où vous préparez la nourriture et où les enfants et les animaux jouent.</p><p>Si vous donnez à votre enfant son médicament injectable par voie orale, portez une blouse, un masque et des gants pour votre protection. Vous aurez également besoin des articles suivants :</p><ul><li>du papier essuie-tout ou une feuille absorbante jetable à endos en plastique — pour absorber tout déversement</li><li>le flacon de médicaments</li><li>une seringue — pour prélever le médicament du flacon</li><li>un accessoire permettant l’accès au flacon (pointe pour flacon) — pour permettre le retrait en toute sécurité du médicament du flacon</li><li>un récipient avec couvercle ou un sac en plastique — pour l’élimination de la seringue, du flacon et de la pointe</li><li>une boisson appropriée. Le fournisseur de soins de santé de votre enfant vous dira quelles boissons conviennent</li><li>un contenant étiqueté — pour placer tout médicament mélangé non utilisé</li><li>un gobelet à médicaments ou un gobelet étiqueté — utilisé uniquement pour administrer le médicament</li></ul><h2>Comment administrer à votre enfant le médicament injectable par voie orale</h2><p>Préparez toujours le médicament juste avant que votre enfant ne le prenne. Ne jamais préparer et conserver la dose à l’avance.</p><p>Avant de donner le médicament à votre enfant :</p> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/chemo_at_home_general_wash_hands_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="handwashing at sink" /> </figure> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/chemo_at_home_general_protect_yourself_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Illustration d'une personne portant des gants, une blouse et un masque" /></figure> <ul><li>Lavez-vous les mains à l’eau savonneuse.</li><li>Portez des gants, une blouse et un masque.</li><li>Déposez du papier essuie-tout ou une feuille absorbante jetable à endos en plastique sur votre surface de travail.</li></ul> <br>
ਐਟੋਪੋਸਾਈਡ: ਮੂੰਹ ਰਾਹੀਂ ਕਿਵੇਂ ਦੇਣੀ ਹੈਐਟੋਪੋਸਾਈਡ: ਮੂੰਹ ਰਾਹੀਂ ਕਿਵੇਂ ਦੇਣੀ ਹੈEtoposide: How to Give by MouthPunjabiNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2010-12-23T05:00:00Z63.00000000000008.00000000000000472.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>ਤੁਹਾਡੇ ਬੱਚੇ ਨੂੰ ਐਟੋਪੋਸਾਈਡ ਮੂੰਹ ਰਾਹੀਂ ਦੇਣ ਬਾਰੇ ਆਸਾਨੀ ਨਾਲ ਪੜ੍ਹੀ ਜਾਣ ਵਾਲੀ ਗਾਈਡ।</p>
Manipulación segura de medicamentos peligrosos en el hogar: Cómo administrar medicamentos inyectables por la bocaMManipulación segura de medicamentos peligrosos en el hogar: Cómo administrar medicamentos inyectables por la bocaSafe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving injectable medicine by mouthSpanishPharmacyTeen (13-18 years);Baby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years)NANADrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2019-03-29T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Una guía para preparar y administrar medicamentos peligrosos inyectables por la boca de manera segura.</p><p>Si el medicamento peligroso de su hijo viene en formato inyectable que se puede administrar por la boca con una jeringa oral o una taza, siga estas instrucciones.</p><h2>Puntos claves</h2><ul><li>Para protegerse cuando manipula medicamentos peligrosos, puede usar una bata, una mascarilla y guantes.</li><li>Para extraer el medicamento peligroso inyectable del frasco, necesitará un dispositivo de acceso al frasco (punzón) y una jeringa.</li><li>Puede diluir el medicamento inyectable en una bebida aprobada.</li><li>Use un nuevo punzón de frasco para cada frasco nuevo de medicamento que usa.</li></ul>
எட்டோபோசைட்: வாய் வழியாக எப்படிக் கொடுப்பதுஎட்டோபோசைட்: வாய் வழியாக எப்படிக் கொடுப்பதுEtoposide: How to Give by MouthTamilNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2010-12-23T05:00:00Z63.00000000000008.00000000000000472.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>உங்களுடைய பிள்ளைக்கு வாய்வழியாக எட்டோபோசைட் மருந்தைக் கொடுப்பது பற்றி வாசிக்க இலகுவான ஒரு வழிகாட்டி நூல்</p>
Thuốc Etoposide: Làm Thế Nào Để Cho Uống Thuốc MiệngTThuốc Etoposide: Làm Thế Nào Để Cho Uống Thuốc MiệngEtoposide: How to Give by MouthVietnameseHaematologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NAImmune systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2010-12-23T05:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Một tài liệu dễ đọc hướng dẫn việc cho con của bạn uống thuốc etoposide bằng đường miệng.</p>

 

 

 

 

Safe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving injectable medicine by mouth1001.00000000000Safe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving injectable medicine by mouthSafe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving injectable medicine by mouthSEnglishPharmacyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANADrug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-10-22T04:00:00Z7.4000000000000067.50000000000001589.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>A guide on preparing and giving injectable hazardous medicine safely by mouth.</p><p>If your child's hazardous medicine comes in an injectable form that can be given by mouth using an oral syringe or a cup, follow these instructions.</p><h2>What is hazardous medicine?</h2><p>Hazardous medicines are used to treat a variety of medical conditions. For example, chemotherapy is used to treat cancer, and immunosuppressants are used to prevent organ rejection after a transplant.</p><p>Hazardous medicine can damage healthy cells. Anyone handling hazardous medicine should keep themselves protected.</p><p>Although the risk of harm from handling hazardous medicine is small, it is a good idea to avoid exposure. This includes not tasting your child’s medicine. If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, it is best to avoid contact with hazardous medicine. If possible, have someone else prepare and give your child their medicine.</p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/E6kjz_As-XU"></iframe> </div><p>For more videos on how to safely handle hazardous medicines, please view the <a href="https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjJtOP3StIuWBtC0ID5BCbZCMVHJvTcdr">Safe Handling</a> playlist.<br></p><p><strong>Please consider completing this </strong><a href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=WDWRRWMCW3&utm_source=AKHWebsite&utm_medium=AKHWebsite&utm_campaign=2021SHSurvey"><strong>brief survey</strong></a><strong> to provide feedback on these safe handling videos to help us make improvements that would benefit patients and caregivers.</strong><br></p> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A gown, mask and gloves offer protection when handling hazardous medicine.</li><li>To remove the injectable hazardous medicine from the vial, you need to use a vial access device (spike) and a syringe.</li><li>You can dilute the injectable medicine using an approved drink.</li><li>Use a new vial spike for each new vial of medicine that you use.<br></li></ul><p><strong>After reviewing the content on this page, please consider completing this </strong><a href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=WDWRRWMCW3&utm_source=AKHWebsite&utm_medium=AKHWebsite&utm_campaign=2021SHSurvey"><strong>brief survey</strong></a><strong> to provide feedback on these safe handling videos to help us make improvements that would benefit patients and caregivers.</strong><br></p><h2>Giving the medicine</h2><ol><li><p>If your child’s medicine is suitable to be mixed with liquids, put some of the drink into the medicine cup and set aside. You will need to add at least an equal amount of the drink to improve how the medicine tastes.</p><p>Only some medicines can be mixed with liquids. Your child’s health-care provider will tell you if you can do this with your child’s medicine. Ask your health-care provider which drink is suitable to mix with the medicine.</p></li><li>Remove the plastic cap from the vial and place the vial upright on your work surface.</li><li>Remove the vial spike from its packaging and take the protective cover off of the spike. </li><li>Making sure the vial is upright, align the spike with the centre of the vial closure. Keep the spike straight and push it down firmly into the vial until the spike passes through the rubber stopper and the plastic "skirt" snaps onto the vial.</li><li>Remove the syringe from its packaging. Attach the syringe to the top of the vial spike by pushing and twisting until secure. Turn the vial upside down and pull back the syringe plunger slowly to draw out the required dose. Your child’s health-care provider will tell you the required dose. If you need to push medicine back into the vial, turn the vial upright before doing so. </li><li>Remove the syringe from the vial spike. You are now ready to mix the medicine.</li><li>To give the injectable medicine by mouth you can dilute it in the syringe or mix it with the drink.</li><p><strong>Diluting the medicine in the syringe</strong></p><ol type="a"><li><p>Draw some of the drink from the medicine cup into the syringe with the medicine and give it to your child. Whatever amount of medicine your child needs, you will need to add at least an equal amount of the drink to improve how the medicine tastes.</p><p>For example, if your child’s dose is 5 mL, you will need to add at least 5 mL of the drink. You can add more of the drink to the syringe if needed.</p></li><li>Place the syringe into your child’s mouth, and slowly push the plunger to release the drink and medicine solution.</li></ol><p><strong>Mixing the medicine with the drink</strong></p><ol type="a"><li>If your child is unable to take their medicine from a syringe, you can dilute it with the drink in the cup instead. Push the medicine from the syringe into the cup with the drink.</li><li>Stir with the syringe to mix the medicine and the drink together.</li><li>Have your child drink from the cup, making sure they finish all the liquid in the cup. You may give them more of the drink afterwards.</li></ol><li>Once you are done, place the syringe into a container for disposal. You will use a new syringe every time you prepare a dose.</li><li>The vial spike can remain in the medicine vial and can be used for other doses. Your child’s health-care provider will inform you how long you can use the medicine vial once it is opened.</li></ol><p>Store the vial upright, in a cool, dry place, protected from light. Use a new vial spike for each new medicine vial that you use. Discard the empty vial and the used vial spikes into the disposal container.</p><p>Speak to your health-care provider if your child is having trouble taking the medicine.</p><h3>While preparing your child’s medicine, please remember:</h3><ul><li>Use the oral syringe to give the hazardous medicine only. Do not use them for other medicines.</li></ul> <h2>Clean-up and storage of hazardous medicines</h2><p>Hazardous medicines should be handled safely. It is important to carefully handle the clean-up of the supplies and work area, and to dispose of wastes properly.</p><p>Remember these key tips for safe handling of hazardous medicines at home.</p><ul><li>If possible, avoid contact with hazardous medicines if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.</li><li>You and your child should wash your hands before and after handling hazardous medicines.</li><li>Wear gloves when handling hazardous medicine tablets, capsules, or liquids.</li><li>Properly clean, dispose or store the equipment and hazardous medicine.</li></ul><p>All disposable items that have been in contact with hazardous medicines, such as used paper towels and gloves, must go into a designated plastic waste bag or container. Contact the Household Hazardous Waste Depot in your neighbourhood to see if they will accept the waste bags or containers. If such a service does not exist in your area, ask a member of your child's health-care team about other options.</p><p>You may wash and reuse some of your supplies, but do not rinse them in the kitchen sink over other dishes or utensils.</p><p>If you are reusing an item, such as the medicine cup, rinse it with warm soapy water and allow it to air dry. Clean the sink after washing your supplies.</p><p>Always store hazardous medicines away from children and pets. If stored at room temperature, place them in a locked box, away from moisture and direct sunlight, and in a cool, dry place. If the medicine needs refrigeration, place it in a separate container at the back of the fridge. Return the medicine to the locked box or fridge after each use. Do not keep any medicine in your purse, knapsack or diaper bag.</p><h3>Take special precautions with your child's waste (vomit, urine and stool) while they are taking hazardous medicine</h3><p>While your child is taking hazardous medicine, some of the drug is broken down and removed from the body through urine and stool. It may also appear in vomit. It is important that you protect yourself and others from hazardous medicine in your child's urine, stool or vomit by following these guidelines:</p><ul><li>When changing your child’s diaper, wear disposable gloves and place diapers in a sealed plastic bag before disposal.</li><li>If your child is toilet trained, have your child close the lid, to avoid splashes, and flush twice after using the toilet. Always make sure they wash their hands afterwards.</li><li>Have supplies ready in case you need to quickly clean up any accident. You need a paper towel, soap and water, disposable gloves, and a disposable container, such as an empty ice cream container.</li><li>Use a plastic mattress cover to protect the mattress from accidents.</li><li>Keep a plastic container close by in case of vomiting. If you use the container, empty the contents into the toilet and wash with warm soapy water.</li><li>Wear disposable gloves when you are handling any bodily wastes, such as changing soiled sheets or cleaning up vomit.</li><li>Wash soiled clothes or sheets separately from other laundry. If they cannot be washed right away, place them in a sealed plastic bag and set it aside.</li><li>Once you are all finished, wash your hands.<br></li></ul><p> <strong>Please consider completing this </strong><a href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=WDWRRWMCW3&utm_source=AKHWebsite&utm_medium=AKHWebsite&utm_campaign=2021SHSurvey"><strong>brief survey</strong></a><strong> to provide feedback on the above safe handling videos to help us make improvements that would benefit patients and caregivers.</strong><br></p><h2>Preparing the space</h2><p>You will need to gather certain supplies and take careful steps when setting up your work area. Your child’s health-care provider will help you make a list of the supplies you will need. You can buy these materials at a grocery or drug store.</p><p>To handle your child’s hazardous medicine at home, choose an uncluttered counter or table away from windows, fans, vents, areas where you prepare food, and where children and pets play.</p><p>If you are giving your child their injectable medicine by mouth, a gown, mask and gloves offer protection. Other supplies will include:</p><ul><li>paper towels or a disposable, absorbent plastic-backed mat — to contain any spills</li><li>medicine vial</li><li>a syringe — to draw up medicine from the vial</li><li>a vial access device (vial spike) — to allow safe removal of medicine from the vial</li><li>a container with a lid or plastic bag — for disposal of the syringe, vial and spike</li><li>a suitable drink. Your child’s health-care provider will tell you which drinks are suitable</li><li>a labelled container — to place any unused mixed medicine</li><li>a medicine cup or labelled cup — used only for giving the medicine</li></ul><h2>Giving your child the injectable medicine by mouth</h2><p>Always prepare the medicine right before your child will take it. Never prepare and store the dose ahead of time.</p><p>Before giving your child their medicine:</p> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/chemo_at_home_general_wash_hands_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="handwashing at sink" /> </figure><figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/chemo_at_home_general_protect_yourself_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Person wearing gloves, a gown, and a mask over the nose and mouth" /></figure> <ul><li>Wash your hands with soap and water.</li><li>Put on your gloves, gown and mask.</li><li>Place paper towels or a disposable, absorbent plastic-backed mat over your work surface.</li></ul> Safe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Giving injectable medicine by mouthFalse

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.

Our Sponsors