AboutKidsHealth

 

 

Video urodynamic study (VUDS)VVideo urodynamic study (VUDS)Video urodynamic study (VUDS)EnglishUrologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BladderBladderTestsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2021-09-16T04:00:00Z8.5000000000000063.50000000000001257.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>A video urodynamics study (VUDS) is a test done by your child’s doctor that provides information about how well your child’s bladder is working.</p><h2>What is a video urodynamics study (VUDS)?</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Urinary system (female)</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Urinary_female_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Identification of the kidney, ureter, bladder and urethra in a girl" /> </figure> <p>A VUDS is a test done by your child’s doctor that provides information about how well your child’s bladder is working. It combines two procedures: one that measures your child’s <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/body/interactive?module=kidney-child">bladder</a> storage ability and how well it fills and empties (cystometry), and one that takes X-ray images of your child’s bladder (cystography).</p><p>A VUDS measures:</p><ul><li>What is happening to your child’s bladder as it is filling and emptying</li><li>How much urine the bladder can hold and its ability to empty completely</li><li>Bladder sensation (feeling)</li><li>Changes in bladder pressure</li></ul><p>X-rays of the bladder are also taken during a VUDS to visualize what is happening inside it during the test.</p><p>The information on this page will help you and your child get ready for the procedure. After reading it, please explain it to your child using words they can understand. If you have questions, please speak with your child’s doctor or a member of the urodynamics team.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A video urodynamics study (VUDS) tests how well your child’s bladder is working.</li><li>The test will be less uncomfortable if you child is relaxed. To make sure your child is comfortable during the test, tell them what to expect and help them practice relaxation exercises.</li><li>If your child has a urinary tract infection, you will need to reschedule the test.</li><li>If your child feels stinging or burning for more than 48 hours after the test or your child develops a fever, contact your family doctor.</li></ul><h2>Your child's appointment</h2><p>Please arrive 30 minutes before the time of your child’s appointment. The procedure usually takes between 1.5 to 2 hours.</p><h2>Who will be present for the test?</h2><p>A VUDS is conducted by the urodynamics team at the hospital. Your child’s urodynamics team will include a:</p><ul><li>urology nurse practitioner</li><li>medical radiation technologist – <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1294&language=English">voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG)</a> specialist</li></ul><p>You may also be present for the test. One parent/caregiver is allowed to stay with your child during the procedure. You will be required to wear a lead apron to protect yourself from X-rays.</p><h2>What happens during the test?</h2><p>On arrival to the GI/GU department, after check-in, your child will be asked to go to the washroom to empty the bladder and put on a hospital gown. A technologist will start the VUDS by getting to know your child and taking a complete health history. To begin the procedure, the technologist will put a small tube called a urinary catheter into your child’s urethra (urinary passage). If your child catheterizes the bladder at home through a stoma, the test may be also done through this passage. Your child’s bladder will be filled with X-ray contrast agent through this tube. This tube also monitors pressures in the bladder.</p><p>Another small tube will be put into your child’s rectum. This tube measures abdominal pressure during the test. The rectum pushes on the bladder, and this can affect bladder pressure. If your child catheterizes the bowel at home through a stoma, the test may also be done through this passage.</p><p>Your child will also have stickers called electrodes gently stuck to the buttocks and knee. The electrodes let the technologist assess your child’s pelvic floor muscles when the bladder is being filled.</p><p>The technologist will be taking X-ray images throughout the study to watch the bladder and urethra during filling and emptying.</p><h3>Your child’s comfort</h3><p>Having these tubes inserted can be uncomfortable, but it should not hurt. The technologist is very experienced and will help your child relax during the test.</p><p>During the test, your child may have a feeling of fullness or pressure, similar to what they would feel before urinating with a full bladder. The technologist will encourage your child to let them know when your child is having these sensations during the test. This will help the technologist understand how your child’s bladder is working.</p><p>There may be some discomfort when the urinary and rectal tubes are put in and taken out. Your child may have the urge to urinate or have a bowel movement. These feelings will decrease if your child is more relaxed. You or the child life specialist can help your child with the relaxation strategies you practiced.</p><h3>Sedation</h3><p>Some children may need mild <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1260&language=English">sedation</a> or topical <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3001&language=English">anaesthetic</a>, to help them relax and have a positive experience during the test. Please ensure to talk to the urodynamics team at the time of booking to see if sedation or topical anesthetic is an option for your child.</p><h2>After the test</h2><p>Your child may feel stinging or burning when urinating the first few times after the test. Encourage your child to drink a lot of fluids after the test. If the discomfort lasts for more than 48 hours (two days) or your child develops a fever, contact your family doctor.</p><h2>Helping your child get ready for the test</h2><p>The VUDS will be easier and less uncomfortable if your child is relaxed. Before you come to the hospital, explain to your child what will happen. You can help practice relaxing by having your child breath in and out with slow deep breaths.</p><p>To make your child feel more comfortable during the test, bring their favourite toy, a movie, tablet, music or books. <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1153&language=English">Child life specialists</a> can help your child get ready for the test by teaching them to relax and distract themselves. If you think your child would benefit from working with a child life specialist, please reach out to the urodynamics team prior to your appointment. A visual storyboard to help prepare your child for the VUDS is also available on request. A few days before the procedure, your child may be required to do a bowel prep with <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=992&language=English">suppositories</a> (medication that is inserted into the rectum). This will clear out your child’s bowels and help with getting accurate results during the VUDS. If your child is constipated, they may require stool softeners.</p><h2>Before the test</h2><p>Please make sure that your child has something to eat and drink a few hours before the VUDS.</p><p>If possible, encourage your child to try to have a bowel movement on the morning of the test.</p><p>If your child has a heart condition, please check with your family doctor to see if your child will need antibiotics before the test. If antibiotics are needed, your family doctor will write a prescription.</p><p>Please do not use lotion or cream on your child’s skin on the day of the test.</p><h3>Urinary tract infection</h3><p>Please be aware that the test will not be done if your child has a urinary tract infection and is showing symptoms. Signs and symptoms of a urinary tract infection include:</p><ul><li>Burning or stinging with urination</li><li>Foul smelling or cloudy urine</li><li>Abdominal (belly) pain</li><li><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=30&language=English">Fever</a></li><li>Blood in the urine</li></ul><p>If your child has any of these symptoms, please go to your family doctor to check for a urinary tract infection. If your child has an infection, please call to reschedule your appointment.</p><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>The VUDS will be performed in the GI/GU department of the hospital, which is on the 2nd floor of Burton Wing. Please arrive 30 minutes prior to your child’s appointment to ensure enough time for parking, complete screening, registration and check in.</p><p>If you have any questions or concerns about this test, please contact the urology clinic at 416-813-7654 ex.206661 or email <a href="mailto:urology.clinic@sickkids.ca">urology.clinic@sickkids.ca</a> to connect with someone from the urology team.</p>
Dynamique urinaireDDynamique urinaireUrodynamics procedureFrenchUrologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BladderBladderTestsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00Z8.0000000000000066.0000000000000897.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Des tests de dynamique urinaire complets sont un ensemble de tests qui donnent des renseignements au médecin sur le fonctionnement de la vessie de votre enfant.</p><h2>Qu’est-ce qu’une intervention complète de dynamique urinaire?</h2> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Système urinaire (féminin)</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Urinary_female_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="L'emplacement du rein, de l'uretère, de la vessie et de l'urètre d'une fille" /> </figure> <p>Une intervention complète de dynamique urinaire est un ensemble d'examens qui servent à vérifier le fonctionnement de la vessie de votre enfant. Les tests mesurent :</p><ul><li>ce qui se passe dans la vessie de votre enfant quand elle se remplit;</li><li>la quantité d’urine que la vessie peut contenir;</li><li>la sensation associée à la vessie;</li><li>les changements de pression dans la vessie;</li><li>l’étirement (contractilité) de la vessie quand elle se remplit. </li></ul><p>Les renseignements de cette page vous aideront ainsi que votre enfant à vous préparer pour l’intervention. Après l’avoir lue, expliquez-la à votre enfant en vous servant de mots qu’il peut comprendre. Si vous avez des questions, parlez-en au médecin de votre enfant ou à l’infirmier de dynamique urinaire. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Des tests de dynamique urinaire complets montrent le fonctionnement de la vessie de votre enfant.</li> <li>Le test sera moins inconfortable si votre enfant est détendu. Pour faire en sorte que l’enfant soit détendu pendant le test, dites-lui à quoi s’attendre et aidez-le à s’exercer à relaxer.</li> <li>Si votre enfant a une infection urinaire, vous devrez reporter le test.</li> <li>Si votre enfant ressent un pincement ou une sensation de brûlure plus de 48 heures après le test, ou s’il a de la fièvre, communiquez avec votre médecin de famille.</li> </ul><h2>Le rendez-vous de votre enfant</h2> <p>Arrivez 15 minutes avant le rendez-vous. La procédure pendra environ une heure et demie (90 minutes).</p><h2>Ce qui se passe pendant le test</h2> <p>Pendant l’intervention, un infirmier placera un petit tube appelé cathéter urinaire dans l’urètre de votre enfant (canal par où s'évacue l’urine). La vessie de votre enfant sera remplie d’eau au moyen de ce tube. Cela permet aussi de mesurer la pression dans la vessie.</p> <p>Un autre petit tube sera inséré dans le rectum de votre enfant. Cela mesure la pression rectale pendant le test. Le rectum pousse en effet sur la vessie, ce qui peut en modifier la pression.</p> <p>L’insertion de ces tubes peut être inconfortable, mais elle ne devrait pas être douloureuse. </p> <p>Les infirmiers sont très expérimentes et aideront votre enfant à se détendre pendant le test.</p> <p>On collera aussi des timbres appelés électrodes sur les fesses et les hanches de votre enfant. Les électrodes permettent d’évaluer la force des muscles du pelvis pendant que la vessie se remplit.</p> <p>Pendant le test, votre enfant pourrait avoir la sensation d'être « plein » ou ressentir une sensation de pression, semblable à la sensation d’une vessie pleine. Il pourrait ressentir un inconfort quand les tubes urinaire et rectal seront retirés. Votre enfant pourrait avoir envie d’uriner ou d’aller à la selle. Ces sensations seront amoindries si votre enfant est détendu. L'éducateur en milieu pédiatrique ou vous-mêmes pouvez aider votre enfant au moyen des stratégies de relaxation que vous avez répétées.</p> <h3>Sédation</h3> <p>Certains enfants auront besoin d’un léger sédatif pour relaxer et avoir une meilleure expérience pendant le test.</p><h2>Après le test</h2> <p>Votre enfant pourrait ressentir un pincement ou une sensation de brûlure quand il urinera pour les premières fois après le test. Encouragez votre enfant à boire beaucoup après le test. Si l’inconfort dure plus de 48 heures (deux jours), ou si votre enfant a de la fièvre, communiquez avec votre médecin de famille. </p><h2>Aider votre enfant à se préparer pour le test</h2> <p>Le test sera plus facile et moins inconfortable si votre enfant est détendu. Avant de venir à l’hôpital, expliquez à votre enfant ce qui se passera. Vous pouvez vous exercer à vous détendre en demandant à votre enfant d’inspirer et d’expirer lentement et profondément.</p> <p>Pour rendre votre enfant plus confortable pendant le test, vous pouvez lui apporter son jouet préféré, un film ou des livres. Les bébés peuvent avoir une suce ou un biberon pendant le test.</p> <p>Un spécialiste des enfants peut vous aider à préparer votre enfant pour le test en lui enseignant à se détendre et à se distraire. Si votre enfant et vous voulez rencontrer un spécialiste, vous n’avez qu’à le demander.</p> <h2>Avant l'examen</h2> <p>Votre enfant peut manger et boire comme à l’habitude avant le test.</p> <p>Dans la mesure du possible, encouragez votre enfant à aller à la selle avant le test. Si votre enfant suit un horaire, il doit aller à la selle la veille au soir ou le matin de l'examen.</p> <p>Si votre enfant a une maladie cardiaque, veuillez demander à votre médecin de famille si votre enfant aura besoin d’antibiotiques avant le test. Si c’est le cas, votre médecin de famille vous donnera une prescription.</p> <p>N’appliquez pas de lotion sur la peau de votre enfant le jour du test.</p> <h3>Infection urinaire</h3> <p>Veuillez noter que le test n’aura pas lieu si votre enfant a une infection urinaire et s’il a des symptômes. Voici les signes et symptômes d’une infection :</p> <ul> <li>brûlement ou pincement au moment de la miction;</li> <li>urine trouble ou nauséabonde;</li> <li>douleur abdominale (ventre);</li> <li>fièvre;</li> <li>sang dans les urines. </li> </ul> <p>Si votre enfant présente l’un ou l’autre de ces symptômes, rendez-vous chez votre médecin de famille. Si votre enfant a une infection, veuillez appeler pour reporter le rendez-vous. </p><h2>À l'hôpital SickKids</h2> <p>Si votre enfant est déjà venu à l’hôpital, rendez-vous directement au département 5D. Enregistrez-vous à la réception auprès de la réceptionniste du 5D.</p> <p>Si c’est votre première visite à l’hôpital, enregistrez-vous à la réception de l’étage principal avant de venir au 5D. Quand vous arriverez au 5D, enregistrez-vous à la réception auprès de la réceptionniste du 5D.</p> <p>Si vous avez des questions au sujet du test, communiquez avec l’infirmier de l’unité de dynamique urinaire en appelant la clinique d’urologie, au 416-813-6661.</p>

 

 

 

 

Video urodynamic study (VUDS)1291.00000000000Video urodynamic study (VUDS)Video urodynamic study (VUDS)VEnglishUrologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BladderBladderTestsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2021-09-16T04:00:00Z8.5000000000000063.50000000000001257.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>A video urodynamics study (VUDS) is a test done by your child’s doctor that provides information about how well your child’s bladder is working.</p><h2>What is a video urodynamics study (VUDS)?</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Urinary system (female)</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Urinary_female_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Identification of the kidney, ureter, bladder and urethra in a girl" /> </figure> <p>A VUDS is a test done by your child’s doctor that provides information about how well your child’s bladder is working. It combines two procedures: one that measures your child’s <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/body/interactive?module=kidney-child">bladder</a> storage ability and how well it fills and empties (cystometry), and one that takes X-ray images of your child’s bladder (cystography).</p><p>A VUDS measures:</p><ul><li>What is happening to your child’s bladder as it is filling and emptying</li><li>How much urine the bladder can hold and its ability to empty completely</li><li>Bladder sensation (feeling)</li><li>Changes in bladder pressure</li></ul><p>X-rays of the bladder are also taken during a VUDS to visualize what is happening inside it during the test.</p><p>The information on this page will help you and your child get ready for the procedure. After reading it, please explain it to your child using words they can understand. If you have questions, please speak with your child’s doctor or a member of the urodynamics team.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A video urodynamics study (VUDS) tests how well your child’s bladder is working.</li><li>The test will be less uncomfortable if you child is relaxed. To make sure your child is comfortable during the test, tell them what to expect and help them practice relaxation exercises.</li><li>If your child has a urinary tract infection, you will need to reschedule the test.</li><li>If your child feels stinging or burning for more than 48 hours after the test or your child develops a fever, contact your family doctor.</li></ul><h2>Your child's appointment</h2><p>Please arrive 30 minutes before the time of your child’s appointment. The procedure usually takes between 1.5 to 2 hours.</p><h2>Who will be present for the test?</h2><p>A VUDS is conducted by the urodynamics team at the hospital. Your child’s urodynamics team will include a:</p><ul><li>urology nurse practitioner</li><li>medical radiation technologist – <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1294&language=English">voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG)</a> specialist</li></ul><p>You may also be present for the test. One parent/caregiver is allowed to stay with your child during the procedure. You will be required to wear a lead apron to protect yourself from X-rays.</p><h2>What happens during the test?</h2><p>On arrival to the GI/GU department, after check-in, your child will be asked to go to the washroom to empty the bladder and put on a hospital gown. A technologist will start the VUDS by getting to know your child and taking a complete health history. To begin the procedure, the technologist will put a small tube called a urinary catheter into your child’s urethra (urinary passage). If your child catheterizes the bladder at home through a stoma, the test may be also done through this passage. Your child’s bladder will be filled with X-ray contrast agent through this tube. This tube also monitors pressures in the bladder.</p><p>Another small tube will be put into your child’s rectum. This tube measures abdominal pressure during the test. The rectum pushes on the bladder, and this can affect bladder pressure. If your child catheterizes the bowel at home through a stoma, the test may also be done through this passage.</p><p>Your child will also have stickers called electrodes gently stuck to the buttocks and knee. The electrodes let the technologist assess your child’s pelvic floor muscles when the bladder is being filled.</p><p>The technologist will be taking X-ray images throughout the study to watch the bladder and urethra during filling and emptying.</p><h3>Your child’s comfort</h3><p>Having these tubes inserted can be uncomfortable, but it should not hurt. The technologist is very experienced and will help your child relax during the test.</p><p>During the test, your child may have a feeling of fullness or pressure, similar to what they would feel before urinating with a full bladder. The technologist will encourage your child to let them know when your child is having these sensations during the test. This will help the technologist understand how your child’s bladder is working.</p><p>There may be some discomfort when the urinary and rectal tubes are put in and taken out. Your child may have the urge to urinate or have a bowel movement. These feelings will decrease if your child is more relaxed. You or the child life specialist can help your child with the relaxation strategies you practiced.</p><h3>Sedation</h3><p>Some children may need mild <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1260&language=English">sedation</a> or topical <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3001&language=English">anaesthetic</a>, to help them relax and have a positive experience during the test. Please ensure to talk to the urodynamics team at the time of booking to see if sedation or topical anesthetic is an option for your child.</p><h2>After the test</h2><p>Your child may feel stinging or burning when urinating the first few times after the test. Encourage your child to drink a lot of fluids after the test. If the discomfort lasts for more than 48 hours (two days) or your child develops a fever, contact your family doctor.</p><h2>Helping your child get ready for the test</h2><p>The VUDS will be easier and less uncomfortable if your child is relaxed. Before you come to the hospital, explain to your child what will happen. You can help practice relaxing by having your child breath in and out with slow deep breaths.</p><p>To make your child feel more comfortable during the test, bring their favourite toy, a movie, tablet, music or books. <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1153&language=English">Child life specialists</a> can help your child get ready for the test by teaching them to relax and distract themselves. If you think your child would benefit from working with a child life specialist, please reach out to the urodynamics team prior to your appointment. A visual storyboard to help prepare your child for the VUDS is also available on request. A few days before the procedure, your child may be required to do a bowel prep with <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=992&language=English">suppositories</a> (medication that is inserted into the rectum). This will clear out your child’s bowels and help with getting accurate results during the VUDS. If your child is constipated, they may require stool softeners.</p><h2>Before the test</h2><p>Please make sure that your child has something to eat and drink a few hours before the VUDS.</p><p>If possible, encourage your child to try to have a bowel movement on the morning of the test.</p><p>If your child has a heart condition, please check with your family doctor to see if your child will need antibiotics before the test. If antibiotics are needed, your family doctor will write a prescription.</p><p>Please do not use lotion or cream on your child’s skin on the day of the test.</p><h3>Urinary tract infection</h3><p>Please be aware that the test will not be done if your child has a urinary tract infection and is showing symptoms. Signs and symptoms of a urinary tract infection include:</p><ul><li>Burning or stinging with urination</li><li>Foul smelling or cloudy urine</li><li>Abdominal (belly) pain</li><li><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=30&language=English">Fever</a></li><li>Blood in the urine</li></ul><p>If your child has any of these symptoms, please go to your family doctor to check for a urinary tract infection. If your child has an infection, please call to reschedule your appointment.</p><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>The VUDS will be performed in the GI/GU department of the hospital, which is on the 2nd floor of Burton Wing. Please arrive 30 minutes prior to your child’s appointment to ensure enough time for parking, complete screening, registration and check in.</p><p>If you have any questions or concerns about this test, please contact the urology clinic at 416-813-7654 ex.206661 or email <a href="mailto:urology.clinic@sickkids.ca">urology.clinic@sickkids.ca</a> to connect with someone from the urology team.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Urinary_female_MED_ILL_EN.jpgVideo urodynamic study (VUDS)False

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.

Our Sponsors