AboutKidsHealth

 

 

Common arterial trunkCCommon arterial trunkCommon arterial trunkEnglishCardiologyChild (0-12 years)HeartCardiovascular systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-12-04T05:00:00Z11.100000000000043.3000000000000359.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about common arterial trunk, a defect in which a single great artery comes out of the ventricles instead of the usual pulmonary artery and aorta.</p><p>Common arterial trunk is a defect in which a single great artery, or "trunk," comes out of the ventricles instead of the usual pulmonary artery and aorta. This big artery sits on top of the left and right ventricle and is usually accompanied by a ventricular septal defect. The condition results in too much blood being directed to the lungs, so the heart must work much harder to deliver a normal amount of blood to the body. In some cases the heart and body do not receive enough blood flow. The two illustrations below compare a normal heart to a heart with a common arterial trunk.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Normal heart</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Hearts_CHD/Normal_Heart_CHD.jpg" alt="Normal heart showing placement of the atria, ventricles, aorta, superior vena cava, inferior vena cava, pulmonary artery and pulmonary veins" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The heart has two upper (receiving) and two lower (pumping) chambers. Blood flows into the upper chambers (the right atrium and the left atrium). The lower chambers (the right and left ventricles) pump blood out of the heart. The heart valves open and close to keep blood flowing in the correct direction. </figcaption> </figure> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Common arterial trunk</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Hearts_CHD/Common_arterial_trunk.jpg" alt="Heart with a common arterial trunk which gives rise to aorta, pulmonary artery and coronary arteries. Ventricular septal defect under trunk allows blood from both ventricles to mix" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A single great artery (the common arterial trunk) arises from both ventricles and divides into the aorta and the main pulmonary artery. The coronary arteries also arise from the trunk. The common arterial trunk has a single truncal valve instead of the usual aortic and pulmonary valves and a ventricular septal defect is always present. Blood high in oxygen mixes with blood low in oxygen resulting in less oxygen being delivered to the body.</figcaption> </figure> <h2> Key points </h2><ul><li>Common arterial trunk results in lower oxygen levels in blood and less blood reaching the body.</li><li>Symptoms include congestive heart failure and a heart murmur.</li><li>Surgery is generally required early in life, resulting in a high survival rate.</li></ul>
Tronc artérielTTronc artérielTruncus ArteriosusFrenchCardiologyChild (0-12 years)HeartCardiovascular systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-12-04T05:00:00Z12.000000000000038.0000000000000270.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Informez-vous sur le tronc artériel, une anomalie où un seul gros vaisseau part des ventricules au lieu de l’artère pulmonaire et de l’aorte habituelles.</p><p>Le tronc artériel est une anomalie où un seul gros vaisseau, ou « tronc », part des ventricules, au lieu de l'artère pulmonaire et de l'aorte habituelles. Cette grosse artère se trouve sur le dessus des ventricules gauche et droit, et elle est généralement accompagnée d’une communication interventriculaire. Ce trouble fait en sorte qu’une trop grande quantité de sang est acheminée vers les poumons, alors le cœur doit travailler beaucoup plus fort pour fournir une quantité normale de sang au corps. Dans certains cas, le cœur et le corps ne reçoivent pas suffisamment de sang.</p><h2> À retenir </h2> <ul><li>Le tronc artériel cause un manque d’oxygène dans le sang et une diminution du volume de sang distribué dans le corps. </li> <li>Les symptômes comprennent une insuffisance cardiaque congestive et un souffle cardiaque. </li> <li>Une chirurgie est habituellement nécessaire au début de la vie et permet un taux de survie élevé. </li></ul>

 

 

 

 

Common arterial trunk1624.00000000000Common arterial trunkCommon arterial trunkCEnglishCardiologyChild (0-12 years)HeartCardiovascular systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-12-04T05:00:00Z11.100000000000043.3000000000000359.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about common arterial trunk, a defect in which a single great artery comes out of the ventricles instead of the usual pulmonary artery and aorta.</p><p>Common arterial trunk is a defect in which a single great artery, or "trunk," comes out of the ventricles instead of the usual pulmonary artery and aorta. This big artery sits on top of the left and right ventricle and is usually accompanied by a ventricular septal defect. The condition results in too much blood being directed to the lungs, so the heart must work much harder to deliver a normal amount of blood to the body. In some cases the heart and body do not receive enough blood flow. The two illustrations below compare a normal heart to a heart with a common arterial trunk.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Normal heart</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Hearts_CHD/Normal_Heart_CHD.jpg" alt="Normal heart showing placement of the atria, ventricles, aorta, superior vena cava, inferior vena cava, pulmonary artery and pulmonary veins" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The heart has two upper (receiving) and two lower (pumping) chambers. Blood flows into the upper chambers (the right atrium and the left atrium). The lower chambers (the right and left ventricles) pump blood out of the heart. The heart valves open and close to keep blood flowing in the correct direction. </figcaption> </figure> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Common arterial trunk</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Hearts_CHD/Common_arterial_trunk.jpg" alt="Heart with a common arterial trunk which gives rise to aorta, pulmonary artery and coronary arteries. Ventricular septal defect under trunk allows blood from both ventricles to mix" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A single great artery (the common arterial trunk) arises from both ventricles and divides into the aorta and the main pulmonary artery. The coronary arteries also arise from the trunk. The common arterial trunk has a single truncal valve instead of the usual aortic and pulmonary valves and a ventricular septal defect is always present. Blood high in oxygen mixes with blood low in oxygen resulting in less oxygen being delivered to the body.</figcaption> </figure> <h2> Key points </h2><ul><li>Common arterial trunk results in lower oxygen levels in blood and less blood reaching the body.</li><li>Symptoms include congestive heart failure and a heart murmur.</li><li>Surgery is generally required early in life, resulting in a high survival rate.</li></ul><p>Common arterial trunks makes up 1.1% to 2.5% of all types of congenital heart disease.</p><h2>What are the symptoms of common arterial trunk?</h2><p>Symptoms include congestive heart failure and heart murmur. </p><p>A diagnosis is usually made by way of an echocardiogram or cardiac catheterization. </p><h2>How is common arterial trunk treated?</h2><p>This defect generally requires surgery early in life. This involves closing the ventricular septal defect, separating the pulmonary arteries from the large common artery, and connecting the pulmonary arteries to the right ventricle by way of an artificial connection, or conduit. </p><h2>What is the long-term outlook for children with common arterial trunk?</h2><p>With surgery, about 90% of children survive. The outlook is good, though additional surgery to replace the conduit may be needed later in life as your child grows. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Hearts_CHD/Common_arterial_trunk.jpgCommon arterial trunkFalse

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.

Our Sponsors