Pens and cartridgesPPens and cartridgesPens and cartridgesEnglishEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2016-10-17T04:00:00Z8.1000000000000061.8000000000000672.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Many people prefer insulin pens to syringes. Find out why they are preferred and what the advantages and disadvantages are.<br></p><p>People often prefer <a href="/Article?contentid=1728&language=English">insulin​</a> pens to syringes because they require less steps to prepare the insulin. Insulin pens also use smaller and thinner needles to deliver insulin. Insulin pens can only give a single type of insulin at one time.<br></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Insulin pens require fewer steps to prepare the insulin than syringes do.</li><li>Insulin pens are designed to only give a single type of insulin at a time.</li><li>For those who require two types of insulin, they will need to use a syringe, or receive the two types in two different pens.<br></li></ul>
Stylos et cartouchesSStylos et cartouchesPens and cartridgesFrenchEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2016-10-17T04:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Beaucoup préfèrent le stylo injecteur à la seringue. Découvrez pourquoi, ainsi que les avantages et les inconvénients du stylo.</p><p>On préfère souvent le stylo injecteur à la seringue, car il y a moins d’étapes à suivre pour préparer l’insuline. De plus, il utilise des aiguilles plus petites et plus minces pour l’injection. Par contre, il injecte un seul type d’insuline à la fois.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Insulin pens require fewer steps to prepare the insulin than syringes do.</li> <li>Insulin pens are designed to only give a single type of insulin at a time.</li> <li>For those who require two types of insulin, they will need to use a syringe, or receive the two types in two different pens.</li></ul>

 

 

 

 

Pens and cartridges1732.00000000000Pens and cartridgesPens and cartridgesPEnglishEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2016-10-17T04:00:00Z8.1000000000000061.8000000000000672.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Many people prefer insulin pens to syringes. Find out why they are preferred and what the advantages and disadvantages are.<br></p><p>People often prefer <a href="/Article?contentid=1728&language=English">insulin​</a> pens to syringes because they require less steps to prepare the insulin. Insulin pens also use smaller and thinner needles to deliver insulin. Insulin pens can only give a single type of insulin at one time.<br></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Insulin pens require fewer steps to prepare the insulin than syringes do.</li><li>Insulin pens are designed to only give a single type of insulin at a time.</li><li>For those who require two types of insulin, they will need to use a syringe, or receive the two types in two different pens.<br></li></ul><p>Insulin pens have several parts:</p><ul><li>a cartridge holder and an insulin cartridge: Rather than taking insulin out of a bottle, you use a cartridge of insulin that fits into the device</li><li>a pen cover, which looks like a regular pen cap</li><li>a pen window; it is a clear part in the insulin pen that looks like the barrel of syringe</li><li>a pen dial; this is a button that you can turn to adjust the dose to be delivered</li><li>a pen injection button at the end of the pen (like a plunger of a syringe); when pushed down, insulin is delivered</li><li>a pen needle; a special needle-tip screws onto the end of the pen</li><li>pen inner and outer needle covers which are little caps that protect the needle.</li></ul><p>However, pens are designed to only give a single type of insulin at a time. For children who require two types of insulin at the same time of the day (e.g., before breakfast), there are two options:</p><ol><li>Mix the two types of insulin and use a syringe (a slower process, but only one injection). </li><li>Receive the two types of insulin using two separate insulin pens (a faster process, more accurate, with a shorter and thinner needle, but two injections).</li></ol><p>Premixed insulin pens are available, but they are usually not suitable for children, who need changes in the ratio of the intermediate/long-acting to fast-acting insulin mix.</p><h2>Inject insulin using an insulin pen</h2><p>This interactive animation shows how to inject insulin using an insulin pen.</p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">How to inject insulin using an insulin pen</span> <div class="asset-animation"> src="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/Style%20Library/akh/swfanimations/swf.html?swffile=AMD_insulin_pen_injection_EN.swf" </div> </figure> <ol><li>Collect the items you will need to inject insulin: an insulin pen, a new replacement insulin cartridge, a new replacement needle, your child’s insulin log and a sharps disposal container.</li><li>Wash your hands with warm, soapy water. Rinse and dry them well.</li><li>Remove the cap on the pen.</li><li>Insert a new insulin cartridge, after you have removed the empty or expired insulin cartridge from the cartridge holder and throw it out in your hazardous wastes bin.</li><li>Attach and prepare a new needle to the end of the cartridge holder.</li><li>Remove the air from the new needle (“priming”). </li><li>Set the dosage by dialing the pen to the right amount of insulin. </li><li>Determine which <a href="/Article?contentid=1735&language=English">inject​ion​ site​</a> you will use.</li><li>Grasp the pen in your dominant hand and position your thumb on the injection button. Do not press down on the injection button just yet.</li><li>Gently pinch up the skin and fat with your other hand using your thumb and forefinger.</li><li>Gently insert the needle steadily and smoothly into the skin at a 90-degree angle. For leaner children, punch up the skin and inject the pen at a 45-degree angle. </li><li>With your thumb, push the injection button all the way down to release the insulin. </li><li>Hold the pen needle in the skin and count to 10 slowly.</li><li>Remove the needle and let go of the pinched-up skin.</li><li>Place the outer needle cap carefully back over the needle. Twist the needle capsule (needle cover and needle) off to safely remove the needle from the pen.</li><li>Use a dry cotton swab to apply gentle pressure to the injection site. The pressure will help prevent bruising.</li><li>Discard the needle capsule in your sharps disposal container. </li></ol>Pens and cartridgesFalse