The glycemic indexTThe glycemic indexThe glycemic indexEnglishEndocrinology;NutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemHealthy living and preventionAdult (19+)NA2016-10-17T04:00:00ZCatherine Pastor RN, MN, HonBSc;Vanita Pais RD, CDE;Jennifer Harrington MBBS, PhD;Jennifer Galle MD, FRCPC​8.1000000000000061.60000000000001015.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Find out what the glycemic index is and how it factors in to your child's diabetes management.</p><p>The glycemic index (GI) helps diabetes patients make healthier choices. This page provides information on low GI foods and outlines some tips for following a low GI diet.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>The glycemic index (GI) ranks carbohydrate-containing foods against straight glucose in terms of how quickly the body metabolizes them.</li> <li>The higher the GI, the faster the food breaks down into sugar and can cause blood-sugar related events.</li> <li>Low GI foods are not always healthy.</li></ul>
Indice glycémiqueIIndice glycémiqueThe glycemic indexFrenchEndocrinology;NutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemHealthy living and preventionAdult (19+)NA2016-10-17T04:00:00ZCatherine Pastor RN, MN, HonBSc;Vanita Pais RD, CDE;Jennifer Harrington MBBS, PhD;Jennifer Galle MD, FRCPC​000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Comprenez ce qu’est l’indice glycémique et son importance dans la prise en charge du diabète de votre enfant.</p><p>L’indice glycémique (IG) aide le diabétique à faire des choix plus sains. Cette page présente des aliments à IG faible et propose des trucs à ceux qui suivent un régime à faible IG.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>L’indice glycémique (IG) compare les aliments contenant des glucides au glucose pur en fonction de la façon dont le corps les métabolise.</li> <li>Plus l’IG est élevé, plus l’aliment en question se transforme en sucre et peut causer des épisodes d’hyperglycémie ou d’hypoglycémie.</li> <li>Les aliments à IG faible ne sont pas forcément sains.</li></ul>

 

 

 

 

The glycemic index1746.00000000000The glycemic indexThe glycemic indexTEnglishEndocrinology;NutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemHealthy living and preventionAdult (19+)NA2016-10-17T04:00:00ZCatherine Pastor RN, MN, HonBSc;Vanita Pais RD, CDE;Jennifer Harrington MBBS, PhD;Jennifer Galle MD, FRCPC​8.1000000000000061.60000000000001015.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Find out what the glycemic index is and how it factors in to your child's diabetes management.</p><p>The glycemic index (GI) helps diabetes patients make healthier choices. This page provides information on low GI foods and outlines some tips for following a low GI diet.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>The glycemic index (GI) ranks carbohydrate-containing foods against straight glucose in terms of how quickly the body metabolizes them.</li> <li>The higher the GI, the faster the food breaks down into sugar and can cause blood-sugar related events.</li> <li>Low GI foods are not always healthy.</li></ul><h2>What is the glycemic index?</h2><p>The body processes carbohydrates from different sources at different speeds. The body metabolizes some quickly and others take more time to break down.</p><p>The glycemic index (GI) ranks carbohydrate-containing foods against straight glucose (the equivalent of white sugar) in terms of how quickly the body metabolizes them.</p><p>Foods can be classified as having low, medium, and high GI values.</p><ul><li>Foods that have a high GI break down faster into sugar, enter into the bloodstream quickly, and can result in higher blood sugar levels. They are the "fast-acting" sugar usually use in case of low blood sugar events.</li><li>Foods that have a low GI break down slowly and may cause a slower rise in blood sugar levels than foods with a higher GI.</li></ul><p>Thus, not all carbohydrates are considered equal. Lower GI foods may help reduce blood sugar fluctuations and improve blood sugar level control for all people with diabetes, including children.</p><p>Therefore, it is particularly healthier for patients with diabetes to choose foods with a lower GI, even if the number of grams of carbohydrates consumed is the same. This will help stabilize blood sugar levels.</p><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th></th><th>Low GI foods</th><th>High GI foods</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr></tr><tr><td> <strong>Effect on blood sugars</strong></td><td>Raises blood sugars slowly <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMN_glycemic_index_arrow_small_EN.png" alt="" /> </td><td>Raises blood sugars very fast <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMN_glycemic_index_arrow_big_EN.png" alt="" /> </td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Types of foods</strong></td><td>Examples:<ul><li>whole grains</li><li>most fruits and vegetables</li><li>beans</li><li>lentils</li></ul> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMN_glycemic_index_low_food_EN.png" alt="" /> </td><td>Examples:<ul><li>white bread</li><li>cereals</li><li>potatoes</li><li>soft drinks</li></ul> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMN_glycemic_index_high_food_EN.png" alt="" /> </td></tr></tbody></table><p>Low GI food does not always imply a healthy food choice. For additional information please refer to the <a href="https://www.diabetes.ca/diabetes-and-you/healthy-living-resources/diet-nutrition/the-glycemic-index" target="_blank">Canadian Diabetes Association</a> or the <a href="http://www.glycemicindex.com/" target="_blank">glycemic index</a> of the University of Sydney.</p><p>A low GI is 55 or less; a medium GI is between 56 and 69; a high GI is 70 or more.</p><h2>Examples of low, medium and high GI foods</h2><p>The following table provides examples of low, medium, and high GI foods:</p><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th></th><th> <strong>Low GI</strong><br>(55 or less)</th><th> <strong>Medium GI</strong><br>(56-69)</th><th> <strong>High GI</strong><br>(70 and more)</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td> <strong> Breads</strong></td><td><ul><li>pumpernickel</li><li>Oat Bran™</li><li>heavy mixed grain</li><li>sourdough</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>rye</li><li>whole wheat</li><li>pita</li><li>hamburger bun</li><li>croissant</li><li>English muffin (white)</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>White bread</li><li>white bagel</li><li>Kaiser roll</li><li>French baguette</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Cereals</strong></td><td><ul><li>All Bran™</li><li>Bran Buds with Psyllium™</li><li>oatmeal</li><li>Oat Bran™</li><li>Special K™</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>Grapenuts™</li><li>Shredded Wheat™</li><li>Quick oats™</li><li>Puffed Wheat™</li><li>Nutrigrain™</li><li>Life™</li><li>Cream of Wheat™</li><li>Muesli™</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>Bran Flakes™</li><li>Cheerios™</li><li>Corn Chex™</li><li>Corn Flakes™</li><li>Rice Krispies™</li><li>Shredded Wheat™</li><li>Crispix™</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Grains</strong></td><td><ul><li>barley</li><li>parboiled or converted rice</li><li>bulgar</li><li>buckwheat</li><li>whole wheat pasta</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>basmati rice<br></li><li>brown rice</li><li>couscous</li><li>cornmeal</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>white or instant rice</li><li>millet</li><li>tapioca</li><li>white pasta</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Legumes</strong></td><td><ul><li>lentils (red, green, and brown)</li><li>chickpeas</li><li>kidney beans</li><li>butter beans</li><li>lima beans</li><li>navy beans</li><li>soy beans</li><li>black beans</li><li>split peas</li><li>baked beans</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>black bean soup</li><li>green pea soup</li><li>sweet corn</li></ul></td><td></td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Vegetables</strong></td><td><ul><li>sweet potato</li><li>yam</li><li>carrots</li><li>peas</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>potato (new/white, boiled)</li><li>beets (canned)</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>french fries</li><li>white mashed potato</li><li>baked potato (Russet)</li><li>parsnips</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Fruits/Juices</strong></td><td><ul><li>apples</li><li>apple juice</li><li>bananas (green)</li><li>cherries</li><li>grapefruit juice</li><li>grapes</li><li>kiwis</li><li>mangos</li><li>oranges</li><li>orange juice</li><li>peaches</li><li>plums</li><li>pears</li><li>prunes</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>apricot (canned)</li><li>banana (brown spots)</li><li>cantaloupe</li><li>papaya</li><li>raisins</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>watermelon</li><li>dates</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Milk products</strong></td><td><ul><li>milk (skim 1%, 2%, & whole)</li><li>plain yogurt</li><li>fruit yogurt</li><li>custard</li><li>chocolate milk</li><li>soy milk</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>ice cream (vanilla)</li></ul></td><td></td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Sugars</strong></td><td><ul><li>fructose</li><li>lactose<br></li><li>strawberry jam</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>honey</li><li>table sugar</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>Gatorade™</li><li>jelly beans</li><li>Life Savers™</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Other/Snacks</strong></td><td><ul><li>pound cake</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>popcorn, pizza</li><li>cookies (oatmeal, short bread, digestive, and arrowroot)</li><li>angel food cake</li><li>Ryvita™ (rye crisps)</li><li>Wheat Thins™</li><li>popcorn</li><li>potato chips<br></li><li>Power bars</li><li>macaroni and cheese (boxed)</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>crackers (soda, graham, saltines)</li><li>vanilla wafers</li><li>doughnut</li><li>pretzels</li><li>rice cakes</li><li>waffles</li><li>corn chips</li><li>processed meals<br></li></ul></td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Tips to help you follow a low GI diet</h2><p>Here are some tips to help you follow a low GI diet that will help with blood sugar regulation:</p><ul><li>Include whole grain breads, whole grain cereals, and legumes more often.</li><li>Have pumpernickel, oat bran, stone ground, and whole grain breads more often than white bread.</li><li>Eat whole wheat pasta, yams, and sweet potato more often than white potatoes or french fries.</li><li>Have parboiled, long grain, and brown rice more often than instant rice and short grain rice.</li><li>Prepare dishes with beans (kidney beans, soybeans, lima beans), chickpeas, and lentils.</li><li>Most fruits, vegetables, and milk products have a low GI. Choose a variety of these foods every day.</li></ul><p>The following examples show you how to lower the GI of your foods in a typical day.</p><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th></th><th> <strong>High GI meal </strong>(55 or less)</th><th> <strong>Low GI meal </strong>(56-69)</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td> <strong>Breakfast</strong></td><td><ul><li>cornflakes</li><li>milk</li><li>apple</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>oatmeal</li><li>milk</li><li>apple</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Snack</strong></td><td><ul><li>cookies</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>a piece of fruit</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Lunch</strong></td><td><ul><li>sandwich (white bread)</li><li>juice</li><li>doughnut</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>sandwich (pumpernickel bread)</li><li>milk</li><li>oatmeal cookies</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Snack</strong></td><td><ul><li>corn chips and salsa</li><li>Gatorade™</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>whole-wheat pita wedges and salsa</li><li>yogurt</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Supper</strong></td><td><ul><li>hamburger (white bun)</li><li>french fries</li><li>pop</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>hamburger (whole wheat bun)</li><li>sweet potato fries</li><li>milk</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Snack</strong></td><td><ul><li>pretzels</li><li>water</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>popcorn</li><li>water</li></ul></td></tr></tbody></table>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMN_glycemic_index_low_food_EN.pngThe glycemic indexFalse