Ingrown toenailIIngrown toenailIngrown toenailEnglishDermatologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)SkinSkinConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2020-05-13T04:00:00Z7.2000000000000068.60000000000001281.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>An ingrown toenail occurs when the side of the nail grows into the surrounding skin. Learn what causes this condition and how it can be treated.</p><h2>What is an ingrown toenail?</h2><p>An ingrown toenail occurs when the side of the nail grows into the surrounding skin instead of straight outward. Since the nail cuts into the skin, it is common for the area to become infected or inflamed.</p><p>Ingrown toenails can cause discomfort and pain. They are a common problem, especially in teenagers and young adults.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_ingrown_toenail_EN.png" alt="Illustration of a healthy toenail and an ingrown toenail" /> </figure><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>An ingrown toenail occurs when the toenail grows into the surrounding skin, causing pain and discomfort.</li> <li>The causes of ingrown toenails include tight footwear, improperly trimmed nails and repeated bumps to the toes.</li> <li>The early signs and symptoms of an ingrown toenail include swelling, redness and pain.</li> <li>Early on, an ingrown toenail can be treated by improving footwear, trimming nails straight across and applying a topical antibiotic ointment, if needed.</li> <li>Later signs of ingrown toenail include pus, a bad smell or a fever. If your child has these signs and symptoms, they should see a doctor because they may need antibiotics.</li> </ul><h2>How does an ingrown toenail affect the body?</h2><p>An ingrown toenail is most likely to occur on the big toe, but any toe can be affected.</p><p>At first, the skin around the ingrowing nail may become red and feel slightly sore. With time, there can be more pain and swelling. Small openings in the skin can then allow bacteria to enter, which can cause the area to become infected.<br></p><h2>What causes an ingrown toenail?</h2><p>An ingrown toenail can have a number of causes, including:</p><ul><li>poorly fitting shoes</li><li>over-trimming of the nails</li><li>tearing or picking at the nail</li><li>repeated pressure or trauma to the nail</li><li>certain nail or toe shapes<br></li></ul><h3>Shoes</h3><p>Shoes that are too narrow or those that put pressure over the nails are more likely to cause ingrown toenails.</p><h3>Nail trimming</h3><p>Trimming the nails too much or rounding the edges instead of cutting straight across can lead to ingrown toenails.</p> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_toenail_trimming_EN.png" alt="Illustration of correct toenail trimming and incorrect toenail trimming" /> </figure> <h3>Picking at nails</h3><p>Ingrown toenails are more likely in children who pick at their toenails.</p><h3>Pressure or impact on the nail</h3><p>An ingrown toenail is more likely to occur following a bump or other injury to the toe. For example, people who participate in sports may be more likely to develop ingrown toenails because their feet might be more prone to pressure and injury. The increased sweating that results from physical activity also makes it easier for bacteria to grow and cause an infection.</p><h3>Nail and toe shapes<br></h3><p>Sometimes, deformities of the foot or toes can place extra pressure on the nails. In addition, some people are born with curved nails that grow downward. Others have toenails that are too big for their toes. All of these factors can make ingrown toenails more likely. Some of these conditions may improve on their own over time.</p><h2>How is an ingrown toenail diagnosed?</h2> <p>A doctor can diagnose an ingrown toenail by examining your child and asking questions about how they feel when they walk.</p> <p>Inspect your child’s feet often to look for any signs of an ingrown toenail. One early sign is redness and swelling of the skin near the edge of the nail. If the ingrown nail is infected, your child may develop a fluid-filled blister or redness that extends around the toe or towards the foot. Your child may also complain that their foot hurts or may limp or wince when they walk.</p><h2>How is an ingrown toenail treated?</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Ingrown toenail: Treatment with tape</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_ingrown_toenail_tape_treatmetreatment.png" alt="Attaching tape to skin beside toenail, pulling to move skin away from toenail, then wrapping tape around to attach the ends" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">1) Attach one end of a piece of tape to the skin beside the ingrown toenail. 2) Move skin out of the way by gently pulling the tape as you start to wrap it around the toe. 3) Stick the two ends of the tape together at the front of the toe, near the cuticle.</figcaption> </figure> <p>Several options are available to treat an ingrown toenail.</p><p>The early signs can be resolved by:</p><ul><li>wearing wider or open-toed footwear</li><li>trimming nails straight across<br></li><li>finding ways to allow the nail to grow out of the skin, for example by using tape to pull the skin beside the nail out of the way (see image to the right).</li></ul><p>Other treatments for ingrown toenails include:</p><ul><li>Soaking the foot in a mix of lukewarm water and mild soap or one to two teaspoons of Epsom salt. After soaking the foot, apply a topical antibiotic ointment around the ingrown toenail. During the day, while your child is wearing shoes, the toenail can be covered with a bandage. At night, the bandage can be removed to allow the toenail to "air out" in bed.</li><li>Using a short piece of unflavoured, unwaxed dental floss to gently separate the skin of the toe.<br></li></ul><p>If an infection develops, your child will need to take antibiotics to treat it and prevent complications. In rare cases, your child might need surgery to resolve the problem.</p><div class="akh-series"><div class="row"><div class="col-md-12"> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Ingrown toenail surgery</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_ingrown_toenail_surgery_EN.png" alt="Illustration of incision line over an ingrown toenail and of toenail with ingrown nail section removed" /> </figure> <h3>How to treat repeated episodes of ingrown toenail</h3><p>If your child experiences ingrown toenail repeatedly, they may need surgery (an operation) to remove part of their nail. This involves a number of steps.</p><ol><li>Your child is injected with a local anaesthetic into the base of their toe to numb it.</li><li>A surgeon cuts their toenail the long way (towards the cuticle), just a few millimetres from the problem edge.</li><li>If the nail bed has been exposed a number of times, the surgeon may apply some medication to help stop the edge of the nail from re-growing and causing another ingrown toenail.<br></li><li>The surgeon dresses the nail with a bandage.<br></li></ol><p>The surgeon will tell you how to care for the area around the nail as it heals.</p></div></div></div><h2>Infection</h2><p>If an infection occurs, the skin may become more swollen, red and painful. Some yellow or green pus (fluid) may start oozing from around the nail. The area may also produce a bad smell. Over time, the skin around the nail can overgrow, causing more pain.</p><p>If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to <a href="/article?contentid=801&language=English">cellulitis</a>, a type of skin infection. In extremely rare cases, it can lead to <a href="/article?contentid=2311&language=English">osteomyelitis</a>, an infection of the bone.</p><h2>When to see a doctor for ingrown toenail</h2> <p>See your child’s doctor if:</p> <ul> <li>you have checked your child and noticed early signs of an ingrown toenail but would like a clear diagnosis</li> <li>your child’s symptoms continue after you have treated the early signs of an ingrown toenail</li> <li>your child complains of pain across the toe</li> <li>your child shows signs of infection beside the nail, such as redness, pus or a bad smell</li> <li>your child has a fever</li> </ul><h2>References</h2><p>Schmitt, B. <a href="https://patiented.solutions.aap.org/handout.aspx?gbosid=494554">Toenail - Ingrown</a>. American Academy of Pediatrics, Pediatric Patient Education. Retrieved from <a href="https://patiented.solutions.aap.org/handout.aspx?gbosid=494554">https://patiented.solutions.aap.org/handout.aspx?gbosid=494554</a>.</p>
Ongle d’orteil incarnéOOngle d’orteil incarnéIngrown toenailFrenchDermatologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)SkinSkinConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2016-07-07T04:00:00ZHealth (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Un ongle incarné est le côté d’un ongle qui pousse dans la peau avoisinante. Découvrez les causes de ce trouble et comment le soigner.</p><h2>Qu’est-ce qu’un ongle d’orteil incarné?</h2><p>Un ongle incarné est le côté d’un ongle qui pousse dans la peau avoisinante au lieu de pousser droit vers l’extérieur. Puisque l’ongle coupe la peau, la zone devient souvent infectée ou enflammée.</p><p>Les ongles incarnés sont très incommodants et peuvent être très douloureux. Il s’agit d’un problème fréquent, surtout chez les adolescents et les jeunes adultes.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_ingrown_toenail_FR.png" alt="Illustration d’un ongle d’orteil en santé et d’un ongle d’orteil incarné" /> </figure><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Un ongle incarné est le côté d’un ongle qui pousse dans la peau avoisinante au lieu de droit vers l’extérieur. Cela cause de la douleur et est incommodant.</li><li>Les chaussures étroites, les ongles mal coupés et les chocs à répétitions aux orteils sont des causes de l’ongle incarné.</li><li>Des signes et des symptômes avant-coureurs d’un ongle d’orteil incarné sont une rougeur, une sensibilité et une douleur.</li><li>Au premier signe d’un ongle d’orteil incarné, il faut changer les chaussures, couper les ongles bien droits et appliquer, au besoin, un onguent antiseptique.</li><li>Lorsque l’état de l’ongle incarné s’aggrave, il peut y avoir du pus, une mauvaise odeur ou une fièvre. Si votre enfant présente ces signes et ces symptômes, il doit voir un médecin parce qu’il peut avoir besoin d’un antibiotique.</li></ul><h2>Quel sont les effets d’un ongle d’orteil incarné sur le corps?</h2><p>L’ongle du gros orteil est le plus susceptible de s’incarner, mais n’importe quel orteil peut être atteint.</p><p>Dans un premier temps, la peau autour de l’ongle incarné peut devenir rouge et légèrement sensible. Des bactéries peuvent alors pénétrer dans la peau par de petites ouvertures et infecter la zone. S’il y a infection, l’enflure, la rougeur et la douleur s’aggravent. Un liquide jaunâtre ou verdâtre (du pus) peut commencer à suinter autour de l’ongle. Une mauvaise odeur peut aussi commencer à se dégager. Avec le temps, la peau autour de l’ongle peut croître de façon excessive, et la douleur s’intensifie. Sans traitement, un ongle incarné peut se transformer en une infection cutanée appelée <a href="/article?contentid=801&language=French">cellulite</a>. Dans de très rares cas, il peut provoquer une <a href="/article?contentid=2311&language=French">ostéomyélite</a>, une infection de l’os.</p><h2>Quelles sont les causes d’un ongle d’orteil incarné?</h2><p>Les causes des ongles incarnés sont nombreuses. En voici quelques-unes :</p><ul><li>des chaussures mal ajustées;</li><li>un ongle mal coupé;</li><li>un ongle déchiré ou écorché;</li><li>un ongle qui subit une pression ou un choc répété;</li><li>des pieds, des orteils ou des ongles anormaux.</li></ul><h3>Chaussures</h3><p>Si les chaussures sont trop étroites ou si elles exercent une pression sur les ongles, il y a un plus grand risque d’avoir des ongles incarnés.</p><h3>Coupe des ongles</h3><p>Trop couper les ongles ou arrondir les bords au lieu de les couper tout droit peut causer des ongles incarnés.</p> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_toenail_trimming_FR.png" alt="Illustration d’un ongle d’orteil bien coupé et d’un ongle d’orteil mal coupé" /> </figure> <h3>S’écorcher les ongles</h3><p>Les ongles incarnés sont plus fréquents chez les enfants qui s’écorchent les ongles.</p><h3>Pression ou choc sur l’ongle</h3><p>Il y a un plus grand risque d’avoir un ongle incarné suite à un coup ou à une autre blessure à l’orteil. Par exemple, les personnes actives et sportives sont plus à risque d’avoir des ongles incarnés parce que leurs pieds sont plus sujets à des pressions et à des blessures. La transpiration accrue qui résulte de l’activité physique favorise la multiplication des bactéries qui causent une infection.</p><h3>Pieds, orteils ou ongles anormaux</h3><p>Parfois, les déformations du pied ou des orteils placent une pression supplémentaire sur les ongles. En outre, certaines personnes naissent avec des ongles de forme incurvée qui poussent vers le bas. D’autres ont des ongles qui sont trop gros pour leurs orteils. Certains de ces problèmes peuvent s’améliorer avec le temps sans traitement.</p><h2>Comment un ongle d’orteil incarné est-il diagnostiqué?</h2><p>Un médecin peut porter un diagnostic d’ongle incarné par un examen de votre enfant et en lui posant des questions sur ce qu'il ressent quand il marche.</p> <p>Inspectez souvent les pieds de votre enfant à la recherche des signes d’un ongle incarné. Un signe avant-coureur est une rougeur et une enflure de la peau près du pourtour de l’ongle. Si l’ongle incarné est infecté, il se peut que votre enfant ait une cloque remplie de fluide. Votre enfant peut aussi se plaindre que son pied lui fait mal et il peut boiter ou grimacer quand il marche.</p><h2>Comment un ongle d’orteil incarné est-il soigné?</h2><p>Il y a plusieurs façons de soigner un ongle incarné.</p><p>On peut réagir aux signes avant-coureurs en :</p><ul><li>faisant porter à l’enfant des chaussures plus larges ou à bout ouvert;</li><li>en lui coupant les ongles correctement;</li><li>en trouvant des moyens de permettre à l’ongle de pousser hors de la peau. Par exemple, utiliser un sparadrap pour écarter la peau à côté de l’ongle.</li></ul> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Ongle d’orteil incarné : premiers soins avec un sparadrap</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_ingrown_toenail_tape_treatmetreatment_FR.png" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">1) Fixez l’extrémité d’un morceau de sparadrap à la peau à proximité de l’ongle d’orteil incarné. 2) Écartez la peau en tirant doucement sur le sparadrap tandis que vous commencez à l’enrouler autour de l’orteil. 3) Collez les deux extrémités du sparadrap sur la partie avant de l’orteil, près de la cuticule.</figcaption> </figure> <p>On peut aussi faire prendre des bains de pied dans un mélange d’eau tiède et de savon doux, puis appliquer à l’ongle un antibiotique antiseptique ou topique. Le jour, quand votre enfant porte des chaussures, il s’agit de recouvrir l’ongle d’un bandage. La nuit, lorsqu’il est dans son lit, le bandage est retiré pour permettre à l’ongle de s’aérer.</p><p>En cas d’infection, il faudra que votre enfant prenne un antibiotique pour la traiter et prévenir les complications. Dans de rares cas, votre enfant peut avoir besoin d’une intervention chirurgicale pour régler le problème.</p><h3>Comment traiter des épisodes à répétition d’ongle d’orteil incarné</h3><p>Si votre enfant a eu plusieurs épisodes d’ongle incarné, il se peut qu’il ait besoin d’une chirurgie (une opération) pour retirer une partie de son ongle. Cela comporte un certain nombre d’étapes :</p><ol><li>on injecte un anesthésique local dans la base de l’orteil de votre enfant pour l’engourdir;</li><li>le chirurgien coupe son ongle sur la longueur (vers la cuticule), à quelques millimètres du bord de la zone qui pose le problème;</li> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Chirurgie pour un ongle incarné</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_ingrown_toenail_surgery_FR.png" alt="" /> </figure> <li>si la surface de l’ongle a été exposée un certain nombre de fois, le chirurgien peut appliquer un médicament pour aider à éviter que le bord de l’ongle repousse et s’incarne à nouveau;</li><li>le chirurgien recouvre l’ongle d’un bandage.</li></ol><p>Le chirurgien vous dira comment prendre soin de la zone autour de l’ongle à mesure qu’il guérit.</p><h2>Quand consulter un médecin pour un ongle d’orteil incarné</h2><p>Consultez le médecin de votre enfant si :</p><ul><li>vous avez vérifié les ongles de votre enfant et détecté les signes avant-coureurs d’un ongle incarné. Vous voulez un diagnostic clair;</li><li>les symptômes de votre enfant persistent après que vous avez réagi aux signes avant-coureurs;</li><li>votre enfant se plaint d’une douleur partout dans l’orteil;</li><li>votre enfant présente des signes d’infection près de l’ongle. Il y a une rougeur, du pus ou une mauvaise odeur;</li><li>votre enfant a de la fièvre.</li></ul>

 

 

 

 

Ingrown toenail2303.00000000000Ingrown toenailIngrown toenailIEnglishDermatologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)SkinSkinConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2020-05-13T04:00:00Z7.2000000000000068.60000000000001281.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>An ingrown toenail occurs when the side of the nail grows into the surrounding skin. Learn what causes this condition and how it can be treated.</p><h2>What is an ingrown toenail?</h2><p>An ingrown toenail occurs when the side of the nail grows into the surrounding skin instead of straight outward. Since the nail cuts into the skin, it is common for the area to become infected or inflamed.</p><p>Ingrown toenails can cause discomfort and pain. They are a common problem, especially in teenagers and young adults.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_ingrown_toenail_EN.png" alt="Illustration of a healthy toenail and an ingrown toenail" /> </figure><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>An ingrown toenail occurs when the toenail grows into the surrounding skin, causing pain and discomfort.</li> <li>The causes of ingrown toenails include tight footwear, improperly trimmed nails and repeated bumps to the toes.</li> <li>The early signs and symptoms of an ingrown toenail include swelling, redness and pain.</li> <li>Early on, an ingrown toenail can be treated by improving footwear, trimming nails straight across and applying a topical antibiotic ointment, if needed.</li> <li>Later signs of ingrown toenail include pus, a bad smell or a fever. If your child has these signs and symptoms, they should see a doctor because they may need antibiotics.</li> </ul><h2>How does an ingrown toenail affect the body?</h2><p>An ingrown toenail is most likely to occur on the big toe, but any toe can be affected.</p><p>At first, the skin around the ingrowing nail may become red and feel slightly sore. With time, there can be more pain and swelling. Small openings in the skin can then allow bacteria to enter, which can cause the area to become infected.<br></p><h2>What causes an ingrown toenail?</h2><p>An ingrown toenail can have a number of causes, including:</p><ul><li>poorly fitting shoes</li><li>over-trimming of the nails</li><li>tearing or picking at the nail</li><li>repeated pressure or trauma to the nail</li><li>certain nail or toe shapes<br></li></ul><h3>Shoes</h3><p>Shoes that are too narrow or those that put pressure over the nails are more likely to cause ingrown toenails.</p><h3>Nail trimming</h3><p>Trimming the nails too much or rounding the edges instead of cutting straight across can lead to ingrown toenails.</p> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_toenail_trimming_EN.png" alt="Illustration of correct toenail trimming and incorrect toenail trimming" /> </figure> <h3>Picking at nails</h3><p>Ingrown toenails are more likely in children who pick at their toenails.</p><h3>Pressure or impact on the nail</h3><p>An ingrown toenail is more likely to occur following a bump or other injury to the toe. For example, people who participate in sports may be more likely to develop ingrown toenails because their feet might be more prone to pressure and injury. The increased sweating that results from physical activity also makes it easier for bacteria to grow and cause an infection.</p><h3>Nail and toe shapes<br></h3><p>Sometimes, deformities of the foot or toes can place extra pressure on the nails. In addition, some people are born with curved nails that grow downward. Others have toenails that are too big for their toes. All of these factors can make ingrown toenails more likely. Some of these conditions may improve on their own over time.</p><h2>How is an ingrown toenail diagnosed?</h2> <p>A doctor can diagnose an ingrown toenail by examining your child and asking questions about how they feel when they walk.</p> <p>Inspect your child’s feet often to look for any signs of an ingrown toenail. One early sign is redness and swelling of the skin near the edge of the nail. If the ingrown nail is infected, your child may develop a fluid-filled blister or redness that extends around the toe or towards the foot. Your child may also complain that their foot hurts or may limp or wince when they walk.</p><h2>How is an ingrown toenail treated?</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Ingrown toenail: Treatment with tape</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_ingrown_toenail_tape_treatmetreatment.png" alt="Attaching tape to skin beside toenail, pulling to move skin away from toenail, then wrapping tape around to attach the ends" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">1) Attach one end of a piece of tape to the skin beside the ingrown toenail. 2) Move skin out of the way by gently pulling the tape as you start to wrap it around the toe. 3) Stick the two ends of the tape together at the front of the toe, near the cuticle.</figcaption> </figure> <p>Several options are available to treat an ingrown toenail.</p><p>The early signs can be resolved by:</p><ul><li>wearing wider or open-toed footwear</li><li>trimming nails straight across<br></li><li>finding ways to allow the nail to grow out of the skin, for example by using tape to pull the skin beside the nail out of the way (see image to the right).</li></ul><p>Other treatments for ingrown toenails include:</p><ul><li>Soaking the foot in a mix of lukewarm water and mild soap or one to two teaspoons of Epsom salt. After soaking the foot, apply a topical antibiotic ointment around the ingrown toenail. During the day, while your child is wearing shoes, the toenail can be covered with a bandage. At night, the bandage can be removed to allow the toenail to "air out" in bed.</li><li>Using a short piece of unflavoured, unwaxed dental floss to gently separate the skin of the toe.<br></li></ul><p>If an infection develops, your child will need to take antibiotics to treat it and prevent complications. In rare cases, your child might need surgery to resolve the problem.</p><div class="akh-series"><div class="row"><div class="col-md-12"> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Ingrown toenail surgery</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_ingrown_toenail_surgery_EN.png" alt="Illustration of incision line over an ingrown toenail and of toenail with ingrown nail section removed" /> </figure> <h3>How to treat repeated episodes of ingrown toenail</h3><p>If your child experiences ingrown toenail repeatedly, they may need surgery (an operation) to remove part of their nail. This involves a number of steps.</p><ol><li>Your child is injected with a local anaesthetic into the base of their toe to numb it.</li><li>A surgeon cuts their toenail the long way (towards the cuticle), just a few millimetres from the problem edge.</li><li>If the nail bed has been exposed a number of times, the surgeon may apply some medication to help stop the edge of the nail from re-growing and causing another ingrown toenail.<br></li><li>The surgeon dresses the nail with a bandage.<br></li></ol><p>The surgeon will tell you how to care for the area around the nail as it heals.</p></div></div></div><h2>Infection</h2><p>If an infection occurs, the skin may become more swollen, red and painful. Some yellow or green pus (fluid) may start oozing from around the nail. The area may also produce a bad smell. Over time, the skin around the nail can overgrow, causing more pain.</p><p>If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to <a href="/article?contentid=801&language=English">cellulitis</a>, a type of skin infection. In extremely rare cases, it can lead to <a href="/article?contentid=2311&language=English">osteomyelitis</a>, an infection of the bone.</p><h2>How can I prevent an ingrown toenail?</h2><p>There are many ways to prevent an ingrown toenail. Some of these include:</p><ul><li>Nail trimming: Cut your child's toenails straight across so you can see the corners of the nail. Do not round off corners or cut nails too short. After baths or showers, while the nails are still soft, try to bend the toenail corners upward.</li><li>Wear shoes that fit well: Make sure that your child's shoes are not too narrow or too tight. Shoes that have a wide toe area are the best at preventing the toes from crowding and causing an ingrown toenail.</li></ul><h2>If my child has an ingrown toenail, is there any way to prevent infection?</h2><p>Try not to dig out the nail or cut away ingrown skin yourself. "Bathroom surgeries" (over-manipulating the ingrown nail) can cause infections. Stick with gentle treatments described above, including soaking, taping or using clean dental floss.</p><h2>When to see a doctor for ingrown toenail</h2> <p>See your child’s doctor if:</p> <ul> <li>you have checked your child and noticed early signs of an ingrown toenail but would like a clear diagnosis</li> <li>your child’s symptoms continue after you have treated the early signs of an ingrown toenail</li> <li>your child complains of pain across the toe</li> <li>your child shows signs of infection beside the nail, such as redness, pus or a bad smell</li> <li>your child has a fever</li> </ul><h2>References</h2><p>Schmitt, B. <a href="https://patiented.solutions.aap.org/handout.aspx?gbosid=494554">Toenail - Ingrown</a>. American Academy of Pediatrics, Pediatric Patient Education. Retrieved from <a href="https://patiented.solutions.aap.org/handout.aspx?gbosid=494554">https://patiented.solutions.aap.org/handout.aspx?gbosid=494554</a>.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_ingrown_toenail_surgery_EN.pngIngrown toenailFalse