Screening for complications of diabetesSScreening for complications of diabetesScreening for complications of diabetesEnglishEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemTestsAdult (19+)NA2017-11-20T05:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBScVanita Pais, RD, CDEAndrea Ens, MD, FRCPCJennifer Harrington, MBBS, PhD8.6000000000000054.4000000000000562.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn how often your child needs to be screened for diabetes complications and what you can expect from each test and screening.</p><p>Screening for risk factors and complications starts at diagnosis of <a href="/Article?contentid=1717&language=English">diabetes</a>. Even though complications rarely occur in children and in teenagers, screening is important because detecting complications at an early stage allows for actions to help slow their progression. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Your child will have regular screening tests for complications of diabetes.</li> <li>Your child will need different tests depending on how long they've had diabetes, and whether they have type 1 or type 2.</li></ul>
Dépistage des complications liées au diabèteDDépistage des complications liées au diabèteScreening for complications of diabetesFrenchEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemTestsAdult (19+)NA2017-11-20T05:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBScVanita Pais, RD, CDEAndrea Ens, MD, FRCPCJennifer Harrington, MBBS, PhD000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez à quelle fréquence votre enfant doit subir des tests de dépistage des complications liées au diabète et ce à quoi il faut vous attendre de chaque test et du dépistage.<br></p><p>Le dépistage des facteurs de risque et des complications commence au moment du diagnostic du <a href="/Article?contentid=1717&language=French">diabète</a>. Même si des complications sont rares chez les enfants et chez les adolescents, leur dépistage est important, car la détection de complications à un stade précoce permet d’agir en vue de ralentir leur progression.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Votre enfant subira régulièrement des tests de dépistage pour déceler les complications liées au diabète.</li> <li>Les tests varieront selon le type de diabète dont il est atteint, soit de type 1 ou 2, et depuis quand. </li></ul>

 

 

 

 

Screening for complications of diabetes2521.00000000000Screening for complications of diabetesScreening for complications of diabetesSEnglishEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasEndocrine systemTestsAdult (19+)NA2017-11-20T05:00:00ZCatherine Pastor, RN, MN, HonBScVanita Pais, RD, CDEAndrea Ens, MD, FRCPCJennifer Harrington, MBBS, PhD8.6000000000000054.4000000000000562.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn how often your child needs to be screened for diabetes complications and what you can expect from each test and screening.</p><p>Screening for risk factors and complications starts at diagnosis of <a href="/Article?contentid=1717&language=English">diabetes</a>. Even though complications rarely occur in children and in teenagers, screening is important because detecting complications at an early stage allows for actions to help slow their progression. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Your child will have regular screening tests for complications of diabetes.</li> <li>Your child will need different tests depending on how long they've had diabetes, and whether they have type 1 or type 2.</li></ul><h2>Screening for complications of type 1 diabetes </h2><p>The <a href="/Article?contentid=2511&language=English">diabetes team</a> will recommend on a regular basis some of the following blood and urine tests, and examinations to:</p><ul><li>screen for complications</li><li>monitor blood glucose (sugar) control</li><li>monitor for conditions that occur more often in people with <a href="/Article?contentid=1719&language=English">type 1 diabetes</a>.</li></ul><p>Your child’s health-care team will advise more frequent testing and interventions if they discover any problems.</p><table class="AKH-table"><thead><tr><th colspan="3"> Screening for complications of type 1 diabetes </th></tr><tr><th width="23%"> Complication </th><th> How do we screen for it? </th><th> How often? </th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td> <strong>Hypertension</strong> (high blood pressure)</td><td>Blood pressure</td><td>At least twice per year </td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Dyslipidemia</strong> (blood fat levels out of range)</td><td>Blood test</td><td>Screen at 12 and 17 years of age <br> <br>Children younger than 12 years of age with risk factors</td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Nephropathy</strong> (kidney damage)</td><td>Urine sample</td><td>Yearly screening starting at 12 years of age in those who have had type 1 diabetes longer than 5 years</td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Retinopathy</strong> (eye damage)</td><td>Eye check-up with an optometrist in your community to detect early diabetic retinopathy <br> <br>Diabetes eye exams should include a check of the retina. Eye drops are used to widen the pupils so that back of the eye can be seen</td><td>Yearly screening starting at 15 years of age for teens who have had type 1 diabetes for longer than 5 years <br> <br>Screening can increase to once every 2 years for teens who have good glycemic control, have had type 1 diabetes for less than 10 years and did not have retinopathy at the iniitial eye assessment</td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Neuropathy</strong> (nerve damage)</td><td>Questions and physical examination</td><td>Yearly screening in adolescents post-puberty with poor control, who have had diabetes for longer than 5 years</td></tr></tbody></table> ​​​​​​​ <h2>Screening for complications of type 2 diabetes</h2><p>Because <a href="/article?contentid=1721&language=English">type 2 diabetes</a> can go undetected for a long time, some of these complications may have started by the time of diagnosis. For this reason, the screening for complications in children with type 2 diabetes should start at diagnosis. </p><p>Your child’s health-care team will recommend some of the following blood and urine tests. </p><p>The health-care team will recommend more frequent testing and interventions if they discover any problems.</p><table class="AKH-table"><thead><tr><th colspan="3"> Screening for complications of type 2 diabetes </th></tr><tr><th width="23%"> Complication </th><th> How do we screen for it? </th><th> How often? </th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td> <strong>Hypertension</strong> (high blood pressure)</td><td>Blood pressure</td><td>At every diabetes visit after diagnosis (at least twice a year)</td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Dyslipidemia</strong> (blood fat levels out of range)</td><td>Fasting blood test</td><td>At diagnosis and every 1-3 years after</td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Nephropathy</strong> (kidney damage)</td><td>Urine test</td><td>Yearly screening starting at diagnosis</td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Retinopathy</strong> (eye damage)</td><td>Eye check-up with an optometrist in your community to detect early diabetic retinopathy <br> <br>Diabetes eye exams should include a check of the retina. Eye drops are used to widen the pupils so that back of the eye can be seen</td><td>Yearly screening starting at diagnosis</td></tr><tr><td> <strong>Neuropathy</strong> (nerve damage)</td><td>Questions and physical examination</td><td>Yearly screening starting at diagnosis</td></tr></tbody></table> ​​ <br>Screening for complications of diabetesFalse