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TeethingTTeethingTeethingEnglishDentalBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years)TeethMouthConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2014-01-07T05:00:00ZMichael J. Casas, DDS, MSc, FRCD(C)000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>​Learn the signs and symptoms to look for when your baby is teething and how you can help to soothe your baby's gums.<br></p><h2>What is teething?</h2> <p>Teething is when your baby's first set of teeth ("baby teeth" or primary teeth) start to appear. Caring for your baby's teeth begins as soon as the first tooth peeks through your child's gums. Healthy teeth are an integral part of your baby's overall health. They will help your baby chew and eat properly, learn how to speak and they hold place for the future permanent teeth.​</p> <p>Teething can be a tough period both for babies, who feel the pain, and parents, who witness it. Your baby may cry and drool more than usual, may be agitated and cranky. They may sleep poorly while teething. However, most babies seem to get through teething without any symptoms. If your baby experience symptoms, there are steps you can take that will help both you and your child can get through this stage in good health and spirits.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Healthy teeth are an important part of your baby's health.</li> <li>Treat your baby's pain with acetaminophen or ibuprofen. Never give ASA (acetylsalicylic acid) without first checking with your baby's doctor.</li> <li>You can help soothe your baby's gums with a chilled (but not frozen) washcloth or teething ring made of rubber.</li> <li>Sugary drinks such as juice and soda contribute to tooth decay. Limit your baby's intake of these drinks and never allow them to sleep with a bottle.</li> </ul><h2>Signs and symptoms</h2> <p>You may not be able to see your baby's incoming teeth, but your infant will probably feel them and show signs of teething. Signs and symptoms of teething may include:</p> <ul> <li>swollen or red gums</li> <li>a desire to chew on solid objects</li> <li>drooling, which may begin about two months before the first tooth appears</li> <li>crankiness, irritability or bad temper</li> </ul> <p>Teething does not cause <a href="/article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a> or <a href="/article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a>. If you notice your baby showing these symptoms, contact your doctor right away. In addition, do not assume that crankiness, irritability or bad temper are due to teething.</p><h2>Causes</h2> <p>Teeth pushing through the gums cause discomfort. Since your baby cannot express their soreness and tenderness in words, they may be more irritable and cranky as the teeth emerge.</p><h2>When to see a doctor</h2> <p>Contact your baby's doctor if you notice a persistent fever. Teething does not cause fever. </p> <p>Your child should have their first visit to a dentist at 12 months of age or when they get their first tooth.</p>
التسنيناالتسنينTeethingArabicDentalBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years)TeethMouthConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-05T05:00:00ZNA7.0000000000000071.0000000000000992.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>موجز سهل الفهم عن كيفية تخفيف عدم راحة طفلك اثناء عملية التسنين</p>
出牙出牙TeethingChineseSimplifiedDentalBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years)TeethMouthConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-05T05:00:00Z71.00000000000007.00000000000000992.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z简要概述了在孩子出牙期间如何减轻孩子的不适感。
出牙出牙TeethingChineseTraditionalDentalBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years)TeethMouthConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-05T05:00:00Z71.00000000000007.00000000000000992.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z簡要概述了在孩子出牙期間如何减輕孩子的不適感。
DentitionDDentitionTeethingFrenchDentalBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years)TeethMouthConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2014-01-07T05:00:00ZMichael J. Casas, DDS, MSc, FRCD(C)000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez à reconnaître les signes et les symptômes indiquant que votre bébé fait ses dents et comment vous pouvez aider à soulager ses gencives.</p><h2>Qu’est-ce que la dentition?</h2> <p>La dentition est le moment où les premières dents de votre bébé (les dents de lait) commencent à apparaître (on dit qu'il fait ses dents). Les soins à donner aux dents de votre bébé commencent dès que la première dent perce les gencives. Les dents saines font partie intégrante de la santé générale de votre bébé. Les dents de lait aideront votre bébé à mâcher et manger correctement, à apprendre à parler. Les dents de lait marque la place des futures dents définitives.</p> <p>La dentition peut être une période difficile tant pour les bébés, qui ressentent de la douleur, que pour les parents, qui en sont témoins. Les bébés pleurent et salivent plus qu’à l’habitude, sont parfois plus agités et plus irritables. Ils peuvent mal dormir pendant la dentition. Cependant, la plupart des bébés semblent traverser la dentition sans symptôme. Quoi qu'il en soit, vous pouvez tout de même prendre des mesures qui vous aideront, votre enfant et vous, à passer à travers ce stade sainement et de façon plaisante.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Les soins à donner aux dents de votre bébé commencent dès que la première dent perce ses gencives.</li> <li>Les dents saines constituent une partie importante de la santé générale de votre bébé.</li> <li>Traitez la douleur de votre bébé avec de l’acétaminophène ou de l’ibuprofène. Ne lui donnez jamais d’aspirine sans avoir d’abord consulté votre médecin.</li> <li>Vous pouvez soulager les gencives de votre bébé avec un linge réfrigéré (mais pas congelé) ou un anneau de dentition en caoutchouc.</li> <li>Les breuvages sucrés comme les jus et les sodas contribuent aux carries. Limitez la consommation de ces breuvages par votre bébé et ne le laissez jamais dormir avec un biberon.</li> </ul><h2>Signes et symptômes</h2> <p>Il est possible que vous ne voyiez pas les furtures dents de votre bébé, mais il les sentira probablement et montrera des signes de dentition. Les signes et les symptômes de la dentition peuvent comprendre, sans toutefois s’y limiter, les suivants :</p> <ul> <li>gencives enflées ou rouges;</li> <li>désir de mâcher des objets solides;</li> <li>salivation, qui peut commencer environ deux mois avant l’arrivée de la première dent;</li> <li>irritabilité ou mauvais caractère.</li> </ul> <p>La dentition ne cause pas de <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=French">fièvre</a> ou de <a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=French">diarrhée</a>. Si vous remarquez que votre bébé montre ces symptômes, parlez-en à votre médecin. De plus, ne supposez pas que cette irritabilité ou ce mauvais caractère est dû à la dentition.</p><h2>Causes</h2> <p>Les dents qui poussent à travers les gencives font mal. Étant donné que votre bébé ne peut pas exprimer sa douleur et sa sensibilité en mots, il pourrait être de plus en plus irritable et de mauvaise humeur à mesure que les dents poussent. </p><h2>Quand consulter un médecin</h2> <p>Communiquez avec le médecin de votre bébé si vous remarquez une fièvre persistante. La dentition ne cause pas de fièvre.</p> <p>La première visite chez le dentitste devrait avoir lieu à l’âge de 12 mois ou dès l'apparition de la première dent. </p>
DenticiónDDenticiónTeethingSpanishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2010-03-05T05:00:00Z71.00000000000007.00000000000000992.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p></p>
பற்கள் முளைத்தல்பற்கள் முளைத்தல்TeethingTamilNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2010-03-05T05:00:00Z71.00000000000007.00000000000000992.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z
دانت پھوٹناددانت پھوٹناTeethingUrduNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2010-03-05T05:00:00Z71.00000000000007.00000000000000992.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z

 

 

Teething304.000000000000TeethingTeethingTEnglishDentalBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years)TeethMouthConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2014-01-07T05:00:00ZMichael J. Casas, DDS, MSc, FRCD(C)000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>​Learn the signs and symptoms to look for when your baby is teething and how you can help to soothe your baby's gums.<br></p><h2>What is teething?</h2> <p>Teething is when your baby's first set of teeth ("baby teeth" or primary teeth) start to appear. Caring for your baby's teeth begins as soon as the first tooth peeks through your child's gums. Healthy teeth are an integral part of your baby's overall health. They will help your baby chew and eat properly, learn how to speak and they hold place for the future permanent teeth.​</p> <p>Teething can be a tough period both for babies, who feel the pain, and parents, who witness it. Your baby may cry and drool more than usual, may be agitated and cranky. They may sleep poorly while teething. However, most babies seem to get through teething without any symptoms. If your baby experience symptoms, there are steps you can take that will help both you and your child can get through this stage in good health and spirits.</p><div class="akh-series"><div class="row"><div class="col-md-12"> <figure> <p class="asset-image-title">Primary teeth</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Teeth_primary_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="The top and bottom teeth are numbered, and the incisors, canines and molars are identified" /> <figcaption class="“asset-image-caption”">The first set of teeth that babies develop is called primary teeth. The teeth erupt in a specific order as numbered above. They last until permanent (adult) teeth come in.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>What you can expect</h2><p>The first tooth usually appears at about six months. Every child develops at a different pace, so do not worry if your child's teeth appear as early as three months or as late as 12 months.</p><p>The two bottom front teeth (lower central incisors) are usually the first teeth to appear. These are followed by the two top front teeth (upper central incisors). Most children will have all 20 primary teeth by three years of age. Between the ages of five and 13, your child will lose the primary teeth to make room for the permanent teeth.<br></p></div></div></div><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Healthy teeth are an important part of your baby's health.</li> <li>Treat your baby's pain with acetaminophen or ibuprofen. Never give ASA (acetylsalicylic acid) without first checking with your baby's doctor.</li> <li>You can help soothe your baby's gums with a chilled (but not frozen) washcloth or teething ring made of rubber.</li> <li>Sugary drinks such as juice and soda contribute to tooth decay. Limit your baby's intake of these drinks and never allow them to sleep with a bottle.</li> </ul><h2>Signs and symptoms</h2> <p>You may not be able to see your baby's incoming teeth, but your infant will probably feel them and show signs of teething. Signs and symptoms of teething may include:</p> <ul> <li>swollen or red gums</li> <li>a desire to chew on solid objects</li> <li>drooling, which may begin about two months before the first tooth appears</li> <li>crankiness, irritability or bad temper</li> </ul> <p>Teething does not cause <a href="/article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a> or <a href="/article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a>. If you notice your baby showing these symptoms, contact your doctor right away. In addition, do not assume that crankiness, irritability or bad temper are due to teething.</p><h2>Causes</h2> <p>Teeth pushing through the gums cause discomfort. Since your baby cannot express their soreness and tenderness in words, they may be more irritable and cranky as the teeth emerge.</p><h2>Tips on how you can help soothe your baby's gums</h2><p>When your baby seems uncomfortable, consider helping her with some of these simple tips:</p><h3>Rub your baby's gums</h3><p>Using a clean finger or a damp washcloth, massage your baby's gums. The cold sensation and pressure will help ease the discomfort.</p><h3>Offer your baby a teething ring</h3><p>A teething ring made of firm rubber will allow your baby to put pressure on their gums. Liquid-filled rings are not recommended, as they could break or hurt your baby under the chewing pressure.</p><p>Your child may also like chewing on a pacifier or a bottle, which also puts pressure on the gums. Make sure to fill the bottle with water, not milk or juice, as prolonged contact with the sugar in those liquids can lead to tooth decay called early childhood carries. </p> <h3>Keep it chilled, not frozen</h3><p>A cold washcloth or chilled teething ring will likely relieve your baby. If your baby is <a href="/Article?contentid=497&language=English">eating solid foods</a>, they will also enjoy chilled foods like applesauce or yogurt. However, frozen teething rings are not recommended, as the extreme cold could hurt rather than soothe your baby.</p><h3>Wipe the drool</h3><p>Constant drooling is a part of the teething process. It keeps your baby's mouth hydrated and lets the teeth break through without gum damage. However, too much drool can irritate your baby's skin. Keep your baby's chin dry by wiping the drool with a clean cloth.</p><h3>Monitor the pain</h3><p>If your baby is especially irritated or cranky, you may offer <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a> to ease the pain. Do not give your child <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">ASA</a> (acetylsalicylic acid).</p><h3>Avoid over-the-counter teething creams</h3><p>Unless your doctor recommends a certain type of lotion, avoid teething medications that can be rubbed directly on the baby's gums. Your baby may swallow the medication that could numb their throat. This could interfere with the normal gag reflex. The lotion will more likely be washed away by your baby's saliva and have no effect at all.</p><h2>Mouth care and cleaning</h2><h3>Start cleaning with the first tooth</h3><p>Start taking care of your baby's teeth as soon as they come out. Clean the teeth at least once a day as soon as <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NgnNHtbIwlY">the first tooth appears</a>. Bedtime is usually a good time to start the routine. Use a soft bristle toothbrush designed for babies. For more information, see our page on <a href="/article?contentid=1994&language=English">dental care</a>.​</p><h3>Avoid juices and sugary drinks</h3><p>Limit the amount of sugary beverages your baby drinks. Do not allow your baby to go to bed with a bottle filled with anything else but plain water​. Natural sugars in juice, formula or breast milk will cause serious tooth decay, especially if these liquids pool in your baby's mouth while they are sleeping. Early childhood carries are also associated with iron deficiency <a href="/article?contentid=841&language=English">anemia</a>.</p><h3>Brush twice a day when ready</h3><p>When your child is three or four years of age, you can teach them to brush their teeth for at least two minutes twice a day. Use a green pea-sized amount of toothpaste, and encourage your child to spit out the toothpaste rather than swallow it. Use fluoride containing toothpaste when your child is old enough to spit.</p><h2>When to see a doctor</h2> <p>Contact your baby's doctor if you notice a persistent fever. Teething does not cause fever. </p> <p>Your child should have their first visit to a dentist at 12 months of age or when they get their first tooth.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/teething.jpgteethingTeethingFalse

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