Cecostomy tube insertion using image guidanceCCecostomy tube insertion using image guidanceCecostomy tube insertion using image guidanceEnglishOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Large Intestine/ColonLarge intestineProceduresAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-02-08T05:00:00ZDalia Bozic BScN, MN, NP-PHC;Michelle Cote BScN RN;Prakash Muthusami, MD;Joao Amaral, MD8.8000000000000061.60000000000002168.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Find information about what a cecostomy tube (C-tube) is and why it is used. Also learn about how a C-tube is inserted, the risks and how to care for it once it is inserted.</p><h2>What is a cecostomy tube</h2><p>A cecostomy tube (C-tube) is a thin plastic tube that is placed through the opening on the abdomen and directly into the cecum (first part of the large intestine). A cecostomy tube is inserted by an interventional radiologist using image guidance. A cecostomy tube is placed to help your child empty their bowel.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Cecum location</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/cecum_location_EN.jpg" alt="Location of cecum in the large intestine" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The cecum is the first part of the large intestine (colon).</figcaption></figure> <h2>Who should receive a cecostomy tube?</h2><p>C-tubes can help patients who have issues such as fecal incontinence (soiling) and severe constipation to be independent in their bowel management.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Antegrade continence enema</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/antegrade_continence_enema_EN.jpg" alt="Child sitting on toilet with their cecostomy tube attached to an irrigation bag" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">An antegrade continence enema uses an irrigation bag attached to the cecostomy tube to flush the large intestine (colon) from above the stool. Your child should be sitting on a toilet when the antegrade enema is given.</figcaption></figure> <p>When a patient has a C-tube the bowel is flushed out using an enema. Usually an enema is given by placing liquid into the rectum to help empty the bowel. This is called a retrograde enema. But when using the C-tube, fluid is given through the tube, this fluid passes into the cecum and washes out the stool from above. This is called an antegrade enema. However, for an antegrade enema to be successful, it will require a lot of time and patience from the patient and their family. For this reason, getting a C-tube is not an option for all patients.</p><p>Your child may be a candidate for a C-tube if they:</p><ul><li>experience fecal incontinence with troublesome soiling.</li><li>have experienced long-term severe constipation.</li><li>do not respond well to rectal enemas or other methods.</li></ul><p>Your child may not be a candidate for a C-tube if they:</p><ul><li>have had previous abdominal surgery.</li><li>have excessive soft tissue between the skin surface and the cecum.</li><li>are unable to sit for a prolonged period of time on the toilet.</li></ul><h2>Key Points</h2><ul><li>A cecostomy (C-tube) is used to help your child empty their bowel and to decrease the incidence of fecal incontinence (soiling).</li><li>For the first 10 days after the C-tube insertion, your child should not use the C-tube and will continue with their regular bowel regime.</li><li>The dressing over the C-tube needs to be changed daily or as needed (for example if it gets soiled or becomes loose) for the first two weeks until the retention suture is removed.</li><li>C-tube irrigation should begin 11 days after the C-tube insertion.</li><li>Six weeks after the temporary C-tube insertion, your child will have an appointment to have the temporary C- tube changed to a long-term Chait trapdoor C-tube.</li><li>C-tubes are changed yearly in the interventional radiology department.</li></ul> <h2>During the procedure</h2><p>During the procedure, you will be asked to wait in the surgical waiting room.</p><h2>Your child will have medicine for pain</h2><p>It is important that your child is as comfortable as possible for the procedure. Children will have a <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthesia</a> for C-tube insertion.</p><h2>How is a cecostomy tube inserted?</h2><p>At first, a temporary C-tube is inserted through your child’s abdomen, into the cecum. A small hole is made in your child’s abdomen (most of the time on the right lower abdomen). The temporary C-tube is then inserted using ultrasound and X-ray to guide it into the correct position in the cecum. The entire procedure takes 60 to 90 minutes. This temporary tube is straight with a curly end, like a pig’s tail, that keeps it in place. One or two small pieces of medical wire attached to a thread, called a retention suture, are used to hold the cecum close to the abdominal wall. This retention suture stays in for two weeks while the C-tube tract heals. The temporary tube will remain 3 to 4 inches outside of the body and is fastened to the skin with tape. A dressing will cover the insertion site for two weeks after the procedure. About six weeks after the temporary C-tube is inserted it will be replaced with a long-term Chait trapdoor C-tube.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Cecostomy tube (C-tube) types</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/cecostomy_tube_types_EN.jpg" alt="Illustration of a temporary C-tube in the cecum and a chait trapdoor C-tube in the cecum" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A cecostomy tube (C-tube) is a thin plastic tube that is placed through an opening on the abdomen directly into the cecum to help your child empty their bowel. At first a temporary C-tube will be inserted. After six weeks, a long-term Chait trapdoor C-tube will replace the temporary one.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>After the cecostomy tube insertion</h2><p>Once the C-tube insertion is complete, your child will be moved to the recovery area. The interventional radiologist will come and talk to you about the details of the procedure. As soon as your child starts to wake up, a nurse will come and get you. Your child will be closely monitored and medication for pain will be given when needed.</p><h2>Going home</h2><p>Your child will stay in hospital for three to five days after they have had a C-tube inserted. Your child can go home when the doctor feels it is safe for them to do so. Further teaching and instruction on how to use and care for the C-tube will be provided prior to your child's discharge home.</p><p>During the first two weeks after the procedure, your child should not go into the water and they should avoid taking a bath or going swimming. After two weeks, the retention suture will be cut (this is a painless procedure) and the skin around the C-tube will be assessed. Further support will also be provided to you and your child.</p><p>About six weeks after the temporary C-tube is inserted, you will return to the interventional radiology department to have the tube replaced with a long-term Chait trapdoor C-tube. This tube is less visible than the temporary C-tube and lies almost flush to the skin. It takes only 15 to 30 minutes and your child will not have to stay in hospital overnight or have a general anaesthetic. These tubes are then changed yearly in the interventional radiology department.</p><h2>Visiting the interventional radiologist before the procedure</h2><p>Your child will have a clinic visit in the interventional radiology department before the procedure. This visit will usually take about two hours.</p><p>During the clinic visit you should expect:</p><ul><li>A health and nutrition history and a physical examination will be performed by the clinic nurse and registered dietician.</li><li>An explanation of the procedure, and a review of the consent form with the interventional radiologist.</li><li>A review of fiber and fluid intake with the registered dietician.</li><li>Information on how to care for and use a C- tube with the clinic nurse.</li><li>Information on transition of care from a pediatric institution to an adult facility that would be begin at 16 years of age.</li></ul><h2>Giving consent before the procedure</h2><p>Before the procedure, the interventional radiologist will go over how and why the procedure is done, as well as the potential benefits and risks. They will also discuss what will be done to reduce these risks, and will help you weigh the benefits against the risks. It is important that you understand all of the potential risks and benefits of the C-tube insertion and that all of your questions are answered. If you agree to the procedure, you can give consent for treatment by signing the consent form. A parent or legal guardian must sign the consent form for young children. The procedure will not be done unless you give your consent.</p><h2>How to prepare your child for the procedure</h2><p>Before any treatment, it is important to talk to your child about what will happen. When talking to your child, use words they can understand. Let your child know that medicines will be given to make them feel comfortable during the procedure.</p><p>Children feel less anxious and scared when they know what to expect. Children also feel less worried when they see their parents are calm and supportive.</p><h2>If your child becomes ill within two days before the procedure</h2><p>It is important that your child is healthy on the day of the procedure. If your child starts to feel unwell or has a fever within two days before the C-tube insertion, let your doctor know. Your child's procedure may need to be rebooked.</p><h2>Food, drink, and medicines before the procedure</h2><p>Your doctor will tell you if your child will be required to clear their bowel beginning two days prior to the C-tube insertion. If required, the bowel is cleared in the following way for a cecostomy tube insertion:</p><ol><li>Two days before the procedure your child will start a clear fluid diet. They cannot have any solid food or milk during this time. <table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th colspan="2">Clear fluids</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Chicken, beef or other clear broth (without noodles)</td><td>Kool-Aid</td></tr><tr><td>clear apple juice</td><td>Pedialyte</td></tr><tr><td>Gatorade</td><td>popsicles</td></tr><tr><td>ginger ale</td><td>water</td></tr></tbody></table><p>Jell-O is not a clear fluid and is not included. Your child will continue a clear fluid diet until after the procedure and until the doctors tell you that it is alright to for them to eat solid food. If your child has special needs during fasting, please talk to your referring doctor in advance. Your child may need to be admitted to the hospital for a bowel washout.</p></li><li>Your child will also need to take a medication called Pico-Salax to help clear their bowel before the procedure. Ask your referring doctor or the clinic nurse for instructions on how and when your child will need to take the medication.</li><li>After your child develops nearly clear rectal outflow, they should continue drinking clear fluids. This is important to prevent dehydration. Your child can have clear fluids up to three hours prior to the booked procedure time.</li><li>On the day of the procedure please give your child their regular morning medicines with a sip of water.</li><li>Medicines such as <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=198&language=English">naproxen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=English">warfarin</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=129&language=English">enoxaparin</a> may increase the risk of bleeding. Do not give these to your child before the procedure unless they have been cleared first by their doctor and the interventional radiologist.</li></ol><p>If you have any concerns about your child after they are discharged home, call the IGT clinic at (416) 813-7654 ext. 201804 and speak to the clinic nurse during working hours or leave a non-urgent message with the IGT clinic nurse.</p><p>If you have concerns and it is after working hours, see your family doctor or go to the nearest Emergency Department or call The Hospital for Sick Children switchboard at (416) 813-7500 and ask them to page your referring doctor or the interventional radiology fellow on call.</p><p>For more information on transitioning to adult care see the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.sickkids.ca/good2go/">Good 2 Go Transition Program</a>.</p><p>For more information on fasting see <a target="_blank" href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html">Eating and drinking before surgery</a>.</p><p>For more information on preparing your child for their procedure see <a target="_blank" href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/index.html">Coming for surgery</a>.</p>

 

 

 

 

Cecostomy tube insertion using image guidance3382.00000000000Cecostomy tube insertion using image guidanceCecostomy tube insertion using image guidanceCEnglishOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Large Intestine/ColonLarge intestineProceduresAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-02-08T05:00:00ZDalia Bozic BScN, MN, NP-PHC;Michelle Cote BScN RN;Prakash Muthusami, MD;Joao Amaral, MD8.8000000000000061.60000000000002168.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Find information about what a cecostomy tube (C-tube) is and why it is used. Also learn about how a C-tube is inserted, the risks and how to care for it once it is inserted.</p><h2>What is a cecostomy tube</h2><p>A cecostomy tube (C-tube) is a thin plastic tube that is placed through the opening on the abdomen and directly into the cecum (first part of the large intestine). A cecostomy tube is inserted by an interventional radiologist using image guidance. A cecostomy tube is placed to help your child empty their bowel.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Cecum location</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/cecum_location_EN.jpg" alt="Location of cecum in the large intestine" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The cecum is the first part of the large intestine (colon).</figcaption></figure> <h2>Who should receive a cecostomy tube?</h2><p>C-tubes can help patients who have issues such as fecal incontinence (soiling) and severe constipation to be independent in their bowel management.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Antegrade continence enema</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/antegrade_continence_enema_EN.jpg" alt="Child sitting on toilet with their cecostomy tube attached to an irrigation bag" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">An antegrade continence enema uses an irrigation bag attached to the cecostomy tube to flush the large intestine (colon) from above the stool. Your child should be sitting on a toilet when the antegrade enema is given.</figcaption></figure> <p>When a patient has a C-tube the bowel is flushed out using an enema. Usually an enema is given by placing liquid into the rectum to help empty the bowel. This is called a retrograde enema. But when using the C-tube, fluid is given through the tube, this fluid passes into the cecum and washes out the stool from above. This is called an antegrade enema. However, for an antegrade enema to be successful, it will require a lot of time and patience from the patient and their family. For this reason, getting a C-tube is not an option for all patients.</p><p>Your child may be a candidate for a C-tube if they:</p><ul><li>experience fecal incontinence with troublesome soiling.</li><li>have experienced long-term severe constipation.</li><li>do not respond well to rectal enemas or other methods.</li></ul><p>Your child may not be a candidate for a C-tube if they:</p><ul><li>have had previous abdominal surgery.</li><li>have excessive soft tissue between the skin surface and the cecum.</li><li>are unable to sit for a prolonged period of time on the toilet.</li></ul><h2>Key Points</h2><ul><li>A cecostomy (C-tube) is used to help your child empty their bowel and to decrease the incidence of fecal incontinence (soiling).</li><li>For the first 10 days after the C-tube insertion, your child should not use the C-tube and will continue with their regular bowel regime.</li><li>The dressing over the C-tube needs to be changed daily or as needed (for example if it gets soiled or becomes loose) for the first two weeks until the retention suture is removed.</li><li>C-tube irrigation should begin 11 days after the C-tube insertion.</li><li>Six weeks after the temporary C-tube insertion, your child will have an appointment to have the temporary C- tube changed to a long-term Chait trapdoor C-tube.</li><li>C-tubes are changed yearly in the interventional radiology department.</li></ul> <h2>Skin care</h2><p>The C-tube that is first put in is temporary and there will be a dressing over the insertion site. The C-tube will be secured to the abdomen with a device to prevent it from moving around in the tract. Your child will need to have a dressing covering the insertion site for two weeks until their follow-up appointment. The dressing will need to be <a href="/Article?contentid=3384&language=English">changed</a> at least once a day or whenever it gets wet, soiled or loose.</p><h2>Flushing the temporary cecostomy tube</h2><p>For the first 10 days, you will need to flush the temporary C-tube with 10 mL of normal saline twice a day to ensure the tube does not become blocked.</p><p>To make saline you will need:</p><ul><li>a large container</li><li>table or kosher salt</li><li>tap water (unboiled) room temperature or warm</li></ul><p>Recipe: 2 cups (500 mL) water + 1 teaspoon of salt</p><p>You can make larger volumes of this recipe to help save you time. The saline solution can be kept on your counter top for four hours, or stored in the fridge for four days.</p><h2>Bowel care</h2><p>For the first 10 days after the C-tube insertion, your child should not use the C-tube and continue with their usual bowel cleansing routine as per their doctor's recommendations.</p><p>The C-tube site takes approximately 10 days to heal. Starting on day 11, your child will begin using the C-tube for regular bowel irrigations. During the first few weeks, you may need to make adjustments to the time you do the bowel irrigations and how you do them.</p><p>For more details on how to care for your child after C-tube insertion, please see <a href="/Article?contentid=3384&language=English">Cecostomy tube dressing</a> and <a href="/Article?contentid=3383&language=English">Cecostomy tube common problems</a>.</p><h2>During the procedure</h2><p>During the procedure, you will be asked to wait in the surgical waiting room.</p><h2>Your child will have medicine for pain</h2><p>It is important that your child is as comfortable as possible for the procedure. Children will have a <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthesia</a> for C-tube insertion.</p><h2>How is a cecostomy tube inserted?</h2><p>At first, a temporary C-tube is inserted through your child’s abdomen, into the cecum. A small hole is made in your child’s abdomen (most of the time on the right lower abdomen). The temporary C-tube is then inserted using ultrasound and X-ray to guide it into the correct position in the cecum. The entire procedure takes 60 to 90 minutes. This temporary tube is straight with a curly end, like a pig’s tail, that keeps it in place. One or two small pieces of medical wire attached to a thread, called a retention suture, are used to hold the cecum close to the abdominal wall. This retention suture stays in for two weeks while the C-tube tract heals. The temporary tube will remain 3 to 4 inches outside of the body and is fastened to the skin with tape. A dressing will cover the insertion site for two weeks after the procedure. About six weeks after the temporary C-tube is inserted it will be replaced with a long-term Chait trapdoor C-tube.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Cecostomy tube (C-tube) types</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/cecostomy_tube_types_EN.jpg" alt="Illustration of a temporary C-tube in the cecum and a chait trapdoor C-tube in the cecum" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A cecostomy tube (C-tube) is a thin plastic tube that is placed through an opening on the abdomen directly into the cecum to help your child empty their bowel. At first a temporary C-tube will be inserted. After six weeks, a long-term Chait trapdoor C-tube will replace the temporary one.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>After the cecostomy tube insertion</h2><p>Once the C-tube insertion is complete, your child will be moved to the recovery area. The interventional radiologist will come and talk to you about the details of the procedure. As soon as your child starts to wake up, a nurse will come and get you. Your child will be closely monitored and medication for pain will be given when needed.</p><h2>Going home</h2><p>Your child will stay in hospital for three to five days after they have had a C-tube inserted. Your child can go home when the doctor feels it is safe for them to do so. Further teaching and instruction on how to use and care for the C-tube will be provided prior to your child's discharge home.</p><p>During the first two weeks after the procedure, your child should not go into the water and they should avoid taking a bath or going swimming. After two weeks, the retention suture will be cut (this is a painless procedure) and the skin around the C-tube will be assessed. Further support will also be provided to you and your child.</p><p>About six weeks after the temporary C-tube is inserted, you will return to the interventional radiology department to have the tube replaced with a long-term Chait trapdoor C-tube. This tube is less visible than the temporary C-tube and lies almost flush to the skin. It takes only 15 to 30 minutes and your child will not have to stay in hospital overnight or have a general anaesthetic. These tubes are then changed yearly in the interventional radiology department.</p><h2>Visiting the interventional radiologist before the procedure</h2><p>Your child will have a clinic visit in the interventional radiology department before the procedure. This visit will usually take about two hours.</p><p>During the clinic visit you should expect:</p><ul><li>A health and nutrition history and a physical examination will be performed by the clinic nurse and registered dietician.</li><li>An explanation of the procedure, and a review of the consent form with the interventional radiologist.</li><li>A review of fiber and fluid intake with the registered dietician.</li><li>Information on how to care for and use a C- tube with the clinic nurse.</li><li>Information on transition of care from a pediatric institution to an adult facility that would be begin at 16 years of age.</li></ul><h2>Giving consent before the procedure</h2><p>Before the procedure, the interventional radiologist will go over how and why the procedure is done, as well as the potential benefits and risks. They will also discuss what will be done to reduce these risks, and will help you weigh the benefits against the risks. It is important that you understand all of the potential risks and benefits of the C-tube insertion and that all of your questions are answered. If you agree to the procedure, you can give consent for treatment by signing the consent form. A parent or legal guardian must sign the consent form for young children. The procedure will not be done unless you give your consent.</p><h2>How to prepare your child for the procedure</h2><p>Before any treatment, it is important to talk to your child about what will happen. When talking to your child, use words they can understand. Let your child know that medicines will be given to make them feel comfortable during the procedure.</p><p>Children feel less anxious and scared when they know what to expect. Children also feel less worried when they see their parents are calm and supportive.</p><h2>If your child becomes ill within two days before the procedure</h2><p>It is important that your child is healthy on the day of the procedure. If your child starts to feel unwell or has a fever within two days before the C-tube insertion, let your doctor know. Your child's procedure may need to be rebooked.</p><h2>Food, drink, and medicines before the procedure</h2><p>Your doctor will tell you if your child will be required to clear their bowel beginning two days prior to the C-tube insertion. If required, the bowel is cleared in the following way for a cecostomy tube insertion:</p><ol><li>Two days before the procedure your child will start a clear fluid diet. They cannot have any solid food or milk during this time. <table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th colspan="2">Clear fluids</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Chicken, beef or other clear broth (without noodles)</td><td>Kool-Aid</td></tr><tr><td>clear apple juice</td><td>Pedialyte</td></tr><tr><td>Gatorade</td><td>popsicles</td></tr><tr><td>ginger ale</td><td>water</td></tr></tbody></table><p>Jell-O is not a clear fluid and is not included. Your child will continue a clear fluid diet until after the procedure and until the doctors tell you that it is alright to for them to eat solid food. If your child has special needs during fasting, please talk to your referring doctor in advance. Your child may need to be admitted to the hospital for a bowel washout.</p></li><li>Your child will also need to take a medication called Pico-Salax to help clear their bowel before the procedure. Ask your referring doctor or the clinic nurse for instructions on how and when your child will need to take the medication.</li><li>After your child develops nearly clear rectal outflow, they should continue drinking clear fluids. This is important to prevent dehydration. Your child can have clear fluids up to three hours prior to the booked procedure time.</li><li>On the day of the procedure please give your child their regular morning medicines with a sip of water.</li><li>Medicines such as <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=198&language=English">naproxen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=English">warfarin</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=129&language=English">enoxaparin</a> may increase the risk of bleeding. Do not give these to your child before the procedure unless they have been cleared first by their doctor and the interventional radiologist.</li></ol><h2>Risks of a cecostomy tube insertion</h2><p>C-tube insertion is a low-risk procedure. The risk may increase depending on your child's condition, age and health.</p><p>The risks of a C-tube insertion include:</p><ul><li>pain and discomfort</li><li>bleeding</li><li>infection of the skin, the abdomen or a generalized infection in the body. If your child has a <a href="/Article?contentid=858&language=English">VP shunt</a>, there is a risk of shunt or brain infection</li><li>granulation tissue</li><li>bowel damage requiring surgery</li></ul><p>If you have any concerns about your child after they are discharged home, call the IGT clinic at (416) 813-7654 ext. 201804 and speak to the clinic nurse during working hours or leave a non-urgent message with the IGT clinic nurse.</p><p>If you have concerns and it is after working hours, see your family doctor or go to the nearest Emergency Department or call The Hospital for Sick Children switchboard at (416) 813-7500 and ask them to page your referring doctor or the interventional radiology fellow on call.</p><p>For more information on transitioning to adult care see the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.sickkids.ca/good2go/">Good 2 Go Transition Program</a>.</p><p>For more information on fasting see <a target="_blank" href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html">Eating and drinking before surgery</a>.</p><p>For more information on preparing your child for their procedure see <a target="_blank" href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/index.html">Coming for surgery</a>.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/cecostomy_tube_types_EN.jpgCecostomy tube insertion using image guidanceFalse