Substance use disorder: Signs and symptomsSSubstance use disorder: Signs and symptomsSubstance use disorder: Signs and symptomsEnglishPsychiatry;AdolescentTeen (13-18 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years)NANAConditions and diseases;Healthy living and preventionAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2019-01-30T05:00:00ZKaren Leslie, MD, MEd, BSc10.600000000000050.6000000000000854.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>​Discover the most common emotional, physical and behavioural signs and symptoms of problematic substance use.<br></p><p>​A substance use disorder can have emotional, physical and behavioural symptoms. When reviewing the symptoms below, keep in mind that substance use may be just one of many possible causes.<br></p><h2>​Key points<br></h2><ul><li>If someone has a substance use disorder, they may experience a range of emotional, behavioural and physical signs and symptoms.</li><li>Be aware that a substance use disorder might be only one possible cause for any changes in your child's appearance or behaviour.<br></li><li>A health-care provider usually examines your teen and asks about their lifestyle and substance use before deciding if they can diagnose a substance use disorder.</li><li>If a substance use disorder is diagnosed, your teen may see a counsellor and/or receive day treatment or residential (live-in) treatment.</li></ul><h2>Emotional symptoms of substance use disorder in teens</h2><p>When someone has a substance use disorder, they may generally experience:</p><ul><li>unexplained mood swings</li><li>sadness or <a href="/Article?contentid=19&language=English">depression</a> </li><li>suspicion</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=18&language=English">anxiety</a>.</li></ul><h2>Physical signs and symptoms of substance use disorder in teens</h2><p>Possible physical signs of a substance use disorder include:<br></p><ul><li>bloodshot (red) eyes</li><li>a lasting cough or nasal stuffiness</li><li>lasting or persistent tiredness</li><li>obvious weight loss or gain.</li></ul><h2>Behavioural symptoms of substance use disorder in teens</h2><p>If your teen has a substance use disorder, you may notice the following changes in their behaviour at home, with friends or at school. </p><h3>At home or with friends </h3><p>Some behavioural changes to watch for include:</p><ul><li>showering less and/or losing interest in other forms of self-care</li><li>withdrawing from usual family activities</li><li>coming home late</li><li>not telling you or other family members where they are going</li><li>stealing money or valuable items (to pay for drugs) </li><li>getting into trouble with the law </li><li>changing friends (although this may also occur naturally during the teen years).</li></ul><h3>At school</h3><p>At school, behavioural signs of a substance use disorder may include:</p><ul><li>a drop in grades or school performance</li><li>missing or skipping school</li><li>falling asleep in class </li><li>not doing homework </li><li>dropping out of sports or other extracurricular activities </li><li>forgetting things or not being able to concentrate.</li></ul><p>The above signs and symptoms might suggest other problems in addition to problematic substance use, so it is important to see a health-care provider such as a family doctor, paediatrician or nurse practitioner for a diagnosis and further help if needed.</p><h2>How a substance use disorder is diagnosed</h2><p>Your teen will be assessed by a health-care provider to decide if a diagnosis of substance use disorder is appropriate. </p><p>The health-care provider will collect information from you and/or your teen at a medical appointment. They may ask your teen to fill in some screening questionnaires that can identify someone who is using substances in a problematic way. They may also do a physical exam to look for physical symptoms of certain substance use.</p><p>Your teen has a right to confidential health care whether they meet their health-care provider as part of a visit with you or in a separate appointment on their own. However, the health-care provider must share information about your teen if there are immediate concerns for your teen's safety (such as a risk of suicide or homicide or reported abuse of a teen under 16 years).</p><p>Depending on the substances your teen is using (or if they identify any other risky health behaviours) the health-care provider may also suggest blood or other tests. </p><h3>Will my teen need to do a drug test?</h3><p>Drug tests are rarely helpful for identifying a substance use disorder.<br></p><ul><li>They must be done in a very specific way to be accurate.</li><li>They only show substance use that has taken place in the past 24 to 48 hours.</li><li>There is no evidence that they help establish a trusting relationship between a teen and their health-care provider. </li></ul><p>They may only be done if a teen gives their consent or is unable to consent (for example if unconscious in the emergency room).<br></p><h2>What can a health-care provider do for a teen with a substance use disorder?</h2><p>Depending on the assessment, a health-care provider will make some suggestions to your teen and you about what might be helpful. </p><p>One useful option for a teen with problematic substance use is to see a counsellor. They may use different approaches, including motivational interviewing, to support your teen and help them identify areas where they might want to make some changes to their behaviour. </p><p>Other, more intensive, treatments for substance user disorder include: </p><ul><li>day treatment, where a teen attends a group based program during the week to get treatment and obtain school credits</li><li>residential treatment, where a teen lives at a treatment centre and receives support and schooling every day.</li></ul><p>These different treatments usually include some kind of <a href="/Article?contentid=3665&language=English">family and/or parent treatment and support</a>. In most provinces in Canada, these treatment programs require a teen to agree to take part. A few provinces have laws that permit parents to make this decision instead if the teen is under 16 years of age.<br></p><p>​George, T., & Vaccarino, F. (Eds.) (2015). <em>Substance Abuse in Canada: The Effects of Cannabis Use during Adolescence</em>. Retrieved from <a href="http://www.ccsa.ca/Resource%20Library/CCSA-Effects-of-Cannabis-Use-during-Adolescence-Report-2015-en.pdf">http://www.ccsa.ca/Resource%20Library/CCSA-Effects-of-Cannabis-Use-during-Adolescence-Report-2015-en.pdf</a></p>
Les symptômes de la toxicomanieLLes symptômes de la toxicomanieSubstance use disorder: Signs and symptomsFrenchAdolescent;PsychiatryPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseases;Healthy living and preventionAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2019-01-30T05:00:00ZKaren Leslie, MD, MEd, BScHealth (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Explorez les symptômes de la toxicomanie les plus courants sur les plans affectif, physique et comportemental.</p><p>Un problème de toxicomanie peut être associé à des symptômes sur les plans affectif, physique et comportemental. Sachez que les symptômes figurant ci-dessous ne sont pas nécessairement indicatifs de la toxicomanie et qu’ils peuvent être rattachés à un grand nombre d’autres causes.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Les personnes souffrant d’un problème de toxicomanie peuvent manifester une gamme de symptômes sur les plans affectif, physique et comportemental.</li><li>Sachez que la toxicomanie pourrait être l’unique cause possible expliquant les changements de comportement de votre enfant ou d’apparence que vous observez chez lui.</li><li>Un fournisseur de soins de santé examinera votre adolescent et le questionnera sur son mode de vie et la consommation de substance avant de porter un diagnostic.</li><li>Dans l’affirmative, l’adolescent sera vu par un conseiller ou admis à un programme de traitement de jour ou interne.</li></ul><h2>Symptômes de nature affective liés à la toxicomanie chez les adolescents</h2><p>En général, une personne toxicomane peut éprouver les symptômes suivants :</p><ul><li>sautes d’humeur inexpliquées;</li><li>tristesse ou <a href="/Article?contentid=19&language=French">dépression</a>;</li><li>suspicion;</li><li><a href="/Article?contentid=18&language=French">anxiété</a>.</li></ul><h2>Symptômes physiques de la toxicomanie chez les adolescents</h2><p>Les symptômes possibles comprennent :</p><ul><li>yeux rougis (injectés de sang);</li><li>toux persistante ou congestion nasale;</li><li>fatigue persistante;</li><li>perte ou gain de poids évident.</li></ul><h2>Symptômes comportementaux de la toxicomanie chez les adolescents</h2><p>Si votre adolescent a un trouble lié à la toxicomanie, vous pourriez observer les changements de comportement suivants à la maison, avec les amis ou à l’école.</p><h3>À la maison ou avec les amis</h3><p>Certains changements de comportement notables consistent à : </p><ul><li>Se laver moins fréquemment ou manquer d’intérêt pour d’autres formes de soins corporels.</li><li>Ne plus prendre part aux activités familiales habituelles.</li><li>Arriver à la maison à une heure tardive.</li><li>Ne pas dire à sa famille où l’on va.</li><li>Voler de l’argent ou des objets précieux à ses proches (afin de s’approvisionner en drogues).</li><li>Avoir des ennuis avec la justice.</li><li>Changer d’amis (bien que ce soit naturel pendant l’adolescence).</li></ul><h3>À l'école</h3><p>On observe des manifestations sur le plan du comportement à l’école dont :</p><ul><li>une baisse des résultats scolaires ou du rendement scolaire;</li><li>l’absence aux cours, la pratique de l’école buissonnière;</li><li>le fait qu’il s’endort sur son pupitre;</li><li>les devoirs qui ne sont pas faits;</li><li>l’abandon de pratiques sportive ou d’activités parascolaires;</li><li>une incapacité à se concentrer ou une mémoire défaillante.</li></ul><p>Les symptômes ci-dessus peuvent laisser croire qu’il existe d’autres problèmes en plus de la toxicomanie, de sorte qu’il est important de consulter un fournisseur de soins de santé comme un médecin, un pédiatre ou un infirmier praticien pour obtenir un diagnostic et obtenir plus d’aide au besoin.</p><h2>Comment diagnostique-t-on le trouble lié à la consommation de substances?</h2><p>Un fournisseur de soins de santé évaluera votre adolescent avant de décider s’il convient de porter un diagnostic de trouble lié à la consommation de substances.</p><p>Le fournisseur de soins recueillera vos renseignements ou ceux de votre adolescent lors d’un rendez-vous médical. Il est possible que votre adolescent ait à remplir quelques questionnaires de dépistage qui permettent d’identifier la toxicomanie. Il est aussi possible qu’il ait à subir un examen physique dans le but de déceler les symptômes physiques liés à la consommation de certaines substances.</p><p>Votre adolescent a le droit d’obtenir des soins de santé confidentiels que ce soit lors d’une consultation en votre présence ou seul avec le fournisseur de soins de santé. Ce dernier doit cependant vous faire part d’informations concernant votre adolescent s’il a des préoccupations urgentes liées à sa sécurité (comme le risque de suicide ou d’homicide ou l’agression déclarée sur la personne d’un adolescent de moins de 16 ans).</p><p>Selon les substances que votre adolescent utilise (ou si le fournisseur de soins de santé dépiste tout autre comportement à risque pour sa santé), celui-ci peut également suggérer une analyse sanguine ou d’autres tests.</p><h3>Mon adolescent devra-t-il subir un test de dépistage de drogues?</h3><p>Les tests de dépistage de drogues permettent rarement d’identifier un problème de toxicomanie.</p><ul><li>Ils doivent être effectués d’une manière très précise pour démontrer des résultats exacts.</li><li>Ils peuvent uniquement démontrer la consommation de substances qui a eu lieu 24 ou 48 heures auparavant.</li><li>Rien ne prouve qu’ils aident à établir une relation de confiance entre un adolescent et son fournisseur de soins.</li></ul><p>On peut uniquement s’en servir si l’adolescent donne son consentement ou s’il en est incapable (comme dans le cas où il serait inconscient dans la salle d’urgence).</p><h2>Que peut faire le fournisseur de soins de santé pour un adolescent qui présente un trouble lié à la consommation de substances?</h2><p>En fonction de l’évaluation, un fournisseur de soins de santé pourra faire quelques suggestions utiles à vous ainsi qu’à votre adolescent.</p><p>Une option intéressante consiste à consulter un conseiller en toxicomanie ayant plusieurs approches à sa portée dont l’entrevue motivationnelle. Ces approches servent à soutenir votre adolescent et à l’aider à cerner les domaines dans lesquels il pourrait modifier son comportement.</p><p>D’autres traitements, plus intensifs, pour la toxicomanie comprennent :</p><ul><li>le traitement de jour : l’adolescent assiste à un programme collectif au cours de la semaine qui comprend le traitement et l’obtention de crédits d’études;</li><li>le traitement en résidence : l’adolescent vit dans un centre de traitement et reçoit du soutien tout en faisant ses classes chaque jour.</li></ul><p>Les différents traitements comprennent habituellement une certaine forme de <a href="/Article?contentid=3665&language=French">soutien et de traitement de nature familiale ou parentale</a>. Dans la plupart des provinces canadiennes, ces programmes de traitement exigent le consentement de l’adolescent. Les lois de certaines provinces permettent aux parents d’un adolescent de moins de 16 ans de prendre cette décision à sa place.</p><p>​George, T., & Vaccarino, F. (Eds.) (2015). <em>Substance Abuse in Canada: The Effects of Cannabis Use during Adolescence</em>. Retrieved from <a href="http://www.ccsa.ca/Resource%20Library/CCSA-Effects-of-Cannabis-Use-during-Adolescence-Report-2015-en.pdf">http://www.ccsa.ca/Resource%20Library/CCSA-Effects-of-Cannabis-Use-during-Adolescence-Report-2015-en.pdf</a></p>

 

 

 

 

Substance use disorder: Signs and symptoms3664.00000000000Substance use disorder: Signs and symptomsSubstance use disorder: Signs and symptomsSEnglishPsychiatry;AdolescentTeen (13-18 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years)NANAConditions and diseases;Healthy living and preventionAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2019-01-30T05:00:00ZKaren Leslie, MD, MEd, BSc10.600000000000050.6000000000000854.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>​Discover the most common emotional, physical and behavioural signs and symptoms of problematic substance use.<br></p><p>​A substance use disorder can have emotional, physical and behavioural symptoms. When reviewing the symptoms below, keep in mind that substance use may be just one of many possible causes.<br></p><h2>​Key points<br></h2><ul><li>If someone has a substance use disorder, they may experience a range of emotional, behavioural and physical signs and symptoms.</li><li>Be aware that a substance use disorder might be only one possible cause for any changes in your child's appearance or behaviour.<br></li><li>A health-care provider usually examines your teen and asks about their lifestyle and substance use before deciding if they can diagnose a substance use disorder.</li><li>If a substance use disorder is diagnosed, your teen may see a counsellor and/or receive day treatment or residential (live-in) treatment.</li></ul><h2>Emotional symptoms of substance use disorder in teens</h2><p>When someone has a substance use disorder, they may generally experience:</p><ul><li>unexplained mood swings</li><li>sadness or <a href="/Article?contentid=19&language=English">depression</a> </li><li>suspicion</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=18&language=English">anxiety</a>.</li></ul><h2>Physical signs and symptoms of substance use disorder in teens</h2><p>Possible physical signs of a substance use disorder include:<br></p><ul><li>bloodshot (red) eyes</li><li>a lasting cough or nasal stuffiness</li><li>lasting or persistent tiredness</li><li>obvious weight loss or gain.</li></ul><h2>Behavioural symptoms of substance use disorder in teens</h2><p>If your teen has a substance use disorder, you may notice the following changes in their behaviour at home, with friends or at school. </p><h3>At home or with friends </h3><p>Some behavioural changes to watch for include:</p><ul><li>showering less and/or losing interest in other forms of self-care</li><li>withdrawing from usual family activities</li><li>coming home late</li><li>not telling you or other family members where they are going</li><li>stealing money or valuable items (to pay for drugs) </li><li>getting into trouble with the law </li><li>changing friends (although this may also occur naturally during the teen years).</li></ul><h3>At school</h3><p>At school, behavioural signs of a substance use disorder may include:</p><ul><li>a drop in grades or school performance</li><li>missing or skipping school</li><li>falling asleep in class </li><li>not doing homework </li><li>dropping out of sports or other extracurricular activities </li><li>forgetting things or not being able to concentrate.</li></ul><p>The above signs and symptoms might suggest other problems in addition to problematic substance use, so it is important to see a health-care provider such as a family doctor, paediatrician or nurse practitioner for a diagnosis and further help if needed.</p><h2>How a substance use disorder is diagnosed</h2><p>Your teen will be assessed by a health-care provider to decide if a diagnosis of substance use disorder is appropriate. </p><p>The health-care provider will collect information from you and/or your teen at a medical appointment. They may ask your teen to fill in some screening questionnaires that can identify someone who is using substances in a problematic way. They may also do a physical exam to look for physical symptoms of certain substance use.</p><p>Your teen has a right to confidential health care whether they meet their health-care provider as part of a visit with you or in a separate appointment on their own. However, the health-care provider must share information about your teen if there are immediate concerns for your teen's safety (such as a risk of suicide or homicide or reported abuse of a teen under 16 years).</p><p>Depending on the substances your teen is using (or if they identify any other risky health behaviours) the health-care provider may also suggest blood or other tests. </p><h3>Will my teen need to do a drug test?</h3><p>Drug tests are rarely helpful for identifying a substance use disorder.<br></p><ul><li>They must be done in a very specific way to be accurate.</li><li>They only show substance use that has taken place in the past 24 to 48 hours.</li><li>There is no evidence that they help establish a trusting relationship between a teen and their health-care provider. </li></ul><p>They may only be done if a teen gives their consent or is unable to consent (for example if unconscious in the emergency room).<br></p><h2>What can a health-care provider do for a teen with a substance use disorder?</h2><p>Depending on the assessment, a health-care provider will make some suggestions to your teen and you about what might be helpful. </p><p>One useful option for a teen with problematic substance use is to see a counsellor. They may use different approaches, including motivational interviewing, to support your teen and help them identify areas where they might want to make some changes to their behaviour. </p><p>Other, more intensive, treatments for substance user disorder include: </p><ul><li>day treatment, where a teen attends a group based program during the week to get treatment and obtain school credits</li><li>residential treatment, where a teen lives at a treatment centre and receives support and schooling every day.</li></ul><p>These different treatments usually include some kind of <a href="/Article?contentid=3665&language=English">family and/or parent treatment and support</a>. In most provinces in Canada, these treatment programs require a teen to agree to take part. A few provinces have laws that permit parents to make this decision instead if the teen is under 16 years of age.<br></p><p>​George, T., & Vaccarino, F. (Eds.) (2015). <em>Substance Abuse in Canada: The Effects of Cannabis Use during Adolescence</em>. Retrieved from <a href="http://www.ccsa.ca/Resource%20Library/CCSA-Effects-of-Cannabis-Use-during-Adolescence-Report-2015-en.pdf">http://www.ccsa.ca/Resource%20Library/CCSA-Effects-of-Cannabis-Use-during-Adolescence-Report-2015-en.pdf</a></p>Substance use disorder: Signs and symptomsFalse