Substance use disorder: How to help your teen at homeSSubstance use disorder: How to help your teen at homeSubstance use disorder: How to help your teen at homeEnglishPsychiatry;AdolescentTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseases;Healthy living and preventionAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2019-01-30T05:00:00Z9.2000000000000058.3000000000000856.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>​Discover how to monitor your teen's substance use effectively and what to do if your teen has a substance use disorder.<br></p><p>As your teen develops and becomes more independent, they may be spending more time outside the home with friends and be more willing to try new things, including drugs or alcohol. You can help your teen stay safe and healthy by monitoring their substance use. If they have, or you suspect they have, a substance use disorder, you can take clear steps at home to support their recovery. <br></p><h2>​Key points<br></h2><ul><li>Take time to learn about your teen's well-being outside the home, create open communication with your teen and role model responsible use of substances. <br></li><li>Set age-appropriate rules for your teen's routine and set clear expectations for their behaviour if they decide to try drugs or alcohol. <br></li><li>If your teen has a (suspected) substance use disorder, seek help from a health-care provider who specializes in treating substance abuse in young people.<br></li><li>Support professional treatment with strict ground rules for your teen about avoiding substance use at home, avoiding dangerous situations and attending school or treatment regularly.  <br></li></ul><p>Parent Action on Drugs (n.d.). <em>Information for parents</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://parentactionondrugs.org/for-parents/">https://parentactionondrugs.org/for-parents/</a></p><p>Government of Canada (2019). <em>Talking with teenagers about drugs.</em> Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/substance-abuse/talking-about-drugs/talking-with-teenagers-about-drugs.html">https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/substance-abuse/talking-about-drugs/talking-with-teenagers-about-drugs.html</a></p><p>Canadian Pediatric Society (2017). <em>How to talk to your teen</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/talk_with_your_teen">https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/talk_with_your_teen</a></p><p>Parent Action Pack (n.d.). Retrieved from <a href="http://parentactionpack.ca/">http://parentactionpack.ca/</a> </p><p>Fleming, K., & McKiernan, A. (2018). <em>Talking Pot with Youth: A Cannabis Communication Guide for Youth Allies</em>. Ottawa, ON: Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction. Retrieved from <a href="http://www.ccdus.ca/Resource%20Library/CCSA-Cannabis-Communication-Guide-2018-en.pdf">http://www.ccdus.ca/Resource%20Library/CCSA-Cannabis-Communication-Guide-2018-en.pdf</a> </p>
Trouble lié à la consommation de substances : Comment aider votre adolescent à la maisonTTrouble lié à la consommation de substances : Comment aider votre adolescent à la maisonSubstance use disorder: How to help your teen at homeFrenchAdolescent;PsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseases;Healthy living and preventionAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2019-01-30T05:00:00ZHealth (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Explorez comment surveiller efficacement la consommation de substances et quoi faire si votre adolescent présente un problème de toxicomanie.</p><p>Au fur et à mesure que votre adolescent mûrit et devient plus indépendant, il se peut qu’il passe de plus en plus de temps à l’extérieur du foyer en compagnie de ses amis et qu’il désire faire de nouvelles expériences avec, entre autres, les drogues et l’alcool. En surveillant sa consommation de substances, vous pouvez l’aider à se protéger et à rester en santé. En cas de toxicomanie avérée ou suspectée, vous pouvez entreprendre des démarches à la maison en vue de son rétablissement.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Prenez le temps d’en apprendre sur le bien-être de votre adolescent hors de son foyer, d’ouvrir le dialogue avec votre adolescent et de servir de modèle de comportement à imiter en matière de consommation de substances.</li><li>Établissez des règles adaptées à l’âge de votre adolescent pour sa routine et fixez des attentes pour son comportement s’il décide d’essayer les drogues ou l’alcool.</li><li>Si vous pensez que votre adolescent a un problème de toxicomanie, demandez l’aide d’un fournisseur de soins de santé spécialisé dans le traitement des jeunes gens.</li><li>Favorisez le traitement professionnel assidu pour votre adolescent selon des règles de base strictes pour éviter les situations dangereuses et encouragez la fréquentation scolaire ou la participation régulière à son traitement.</li></ul><p>Parent Action on Drugs (n.d.). <em>Information for parents</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://parentactionondrugs.org/for-parents/">https://parentactionondrugs.org/for-parents/</a></p><p>Government of Canada (2019). <em>Talking with teenagers about drugs.</em> Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/substance-abuse/talking-about-drugs/talking-with-teenagers-about-drugs.html">https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/substance-abuse/talking-about-drugs/talking-with-teenagers-about-drugs.html</a></p><p>Canadian Pediatric Society (2017). <em>How to talk to your teen</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/talk_with_your_teen">https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/talk_with_your_teen</a></p><p>Parent Action Pack (n.d.). Retrieved from <a href="http://parentactionpack.ca/">http://parentactionpack.ca/</a> </p><p>Fleming, K., & McKiernan, A. (2018). <em>Talking Pot with Youth: A Cannabis Communication Guide for Youth Allies</em>. Ottawa, ON: Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction. Retrieved from <a href="http://www.ccdus.ca/Resource%20Library/CCSA-Cannabis-Communication-Guide-2018-en.pdf">http://www.ccdus.ca/Resource%20Library/CCSA-Cannabis-Communication-Guide-2018-en.pdf</a> </p>

 

 

 

 

Substance use disorder: How to help your teen at home3665.00000000000Substance use disorder: How to help your teen at homeSubstance use disorder: How to help your teen at homeSEnglishPsychiatry;AdolescentTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseases;Healthy living and preventionAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2019-01-30T05:00:00Z9.2000000000000058.3000000000000856.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>​Discover how to monitor your teen's substance use effectively and what to do if your teen has a substance use disorder.<br></p><p>As your teen develops and becomes more independent, they may be spending more time outside the home with friends and be more willing to try new things, including drugs or alcohol. You can help your teen stay safe and healthy by monitoring their substance use. If they have, or you suspect they have, a substance use disorder, you can take clear steps at home to support their recovery. <br></p><h2>How to monitor your teen's substance use</h2><ul><li>Ask questions about your child's or teen's school, friends and other parts of their lives (such as any sports and hobbies) to learn about their interests and well-being outside the home. </li><li>Practise authoritative parenting by setting age-appropriate expectations and limits around your teen's routine such as curfews, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=643&language=English">screen time</a>, chores and so on.</li><li>Have conversations with your teen about alcohol and drug use, including over-the-counter and prescription medications and high-caffeine energy drinks. </li><li>Keep open communication with your teen. Listen to them and be open to negotiation.</li><li>Discuss your expectations about your teen's use of alcohol or drugs. Effective messaging about risky behaviour can include statements such as:</li><ul><li> <em>"If you decide to try alcohol or other drugs, I (we) hope that you will use as little as possible."</em></li><li> <em>"If you do decide to use, you can always call me (us) if you are in a situation where you don't feel safe." </em></li></ul><li>Be a role model. Demonstrate to your teen that you can use alcohol (and other drugs) responsibly.</li><li>Spend time with your teen. There is no standard guideline — how much time you spend, and what you do, will be different for every family, depending on work, school and other activities.<br></li></ul><h2>​Key points<br></h2><ul><li>Take time to learn about your teen's well-being outside the home, create open communication with your teen and role model responsible use of substances. <br></li><li>Set age-appropriate rules for your teen's routine and set clear expectations for their behaviour if they decide to try drugs or alcohol. <br></li><li>If your teen has a (suspected) substance use disorder, seek help from a health-care provider who specializes in treating substance abuse in young people.<br></li><li>Support professional treatment with strict ground rules for your teen about avoiding substance use at home, avoiding dangerous situations and attending school or treatment regularly.  <br></li></ul><h2>What to do if your teen has (or you suspect they may have) a substance use disorder</h2><p>First, seek help and support for both you and your teen from a health-care provider, clinic or agency that specializes in treating substance abuse in young people.<br></p>While receiving professional guidance, you may also want to consider setting clear ground rules for your child or teen. For instance, set a clear expectation that your teen does not bring substances into the home or onto the property. Make sure you monitor how your child or teen follows this rule. <p></p><h3>Enforce ground rules</h3><p>Monitoring your teen may involve invading their privacy. This might be difficult, but it is important to remind yourself, and your teen, that their health and safety are your top priority. You may also need to follow a “when/then” script with your teen to explain any stricter rules and inspections. For instance, you might say something like “When I see you making better choices for your health, I’ll respect your privacy again.” Or something like, “I look forward to respecting your privacy in the future, but right now I need you to make sure that you are following house rules.”</p><p>If your child’s or teen’s behaviour has placed them in unsafe situations, do not be afraid to ground them and have them demonstrate responsible behaviour to earn increases in freedom again. Although your child or teen may not acknowledge it, and may even argue forcefully against it, they may be secretly grateful that you are putting limits on their behaviour.</p><h3>Express concerns about behaviour, not people</h3><p>Allow your child and teen to choose their own friends. If you disapprove of your teen’s or their friends’ behaviour, express your concerns about the behaviour rather than the people themselves. Be sure to state clearly what behaviour you expect to see instead.</p><h3>Be clear about regular attendance at school or treatment</h3><p>When a teen is using substances, make it clear that you expect them to attend school every day and on time, unless a physical or mental health condition prevents it. Reinforce your expectations by offering rewards for consistent school attendance.</p><p>If your teen’s substance use is preventing your teen from attending school regularly, make it clear that you expect them to attend treatment regularly.</p><p>Parent Action on Drugs (n.d.). <em>Information for parents</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://parentactionondrugs.org/for-parents/">https://parentactionondrugs.org/for-parents/</a></p><p>Government of Canada (2019). <em>Talking with teenagers about drugs.</em> Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/substance-abuse/talking-about-drugs/talking-with-teenagers-about-drugs.html">https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/substance-abuse/talking-about-drugs/talking-with-teenagers-about-drugs.html</a></p><p>Canadian Pediatric Society (2017). <em>How to talk to your teen</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/talk_with_your_teen">https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/talk_with_your_teen</a></p><p>Parent Action Pack (n.d.). Retrieved from <a href="http://parentactionpack.ca/">http://parentactionpack.ca/</a> </p><p>Fleming, K., & McKiernan, A. (2018). <em>Talking Pot with Youth: A Cannabis Communication Guide for Youth Allies</em>. Ottawa, ON: Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction. Retrieved from <a href="http://www.ccdus.ca/Resource%20Library/CCSA-Cannabis-Communication-Guide-2018-en.pdf">http://www.ccdus.ca/Resource%20Library/CCSA-Cannabis-Communication-Guide-2018-en.pdf</a> </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Substance_use_disorder-How_to_help_your_teen_at_home.jpgSubstance use disorder: How to help your teen at homeFalseSubstance use disorder: How to help