Catheter drainage for pleural effusion (PleurX drainage system)CCatheter drainage for pleural effusion (PleurX drainage system)Catheter drainage for pleural effusion (PleurX drainage system)EnglishOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)LungsLungsProceduresAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2019-07-25T04:00:00ZDalia Bozic, MN, RN(EC), NP-PHC7.8000000000000066.40000000000001728.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>A drainage catheter is a soft flexible tube placed into the pleural space around the lung. The tube drains fluid that is compressing the lung and restricting breathing. Learn about the insertion procedure and how to care for the drainage catheter.</p><h2>What is pleural effusion?</h2><p>The lungs are surrounded by a membrane called the pleura:</p><ul><li>The parietal pleura is the outside membrane.</li><li>The visceral pleura is the inside membrane, attached to the lungs.</li></ul><p>Between the pleural membranes, in the area surrounding the lungs, is the pleural space. Sometimes, there can be a build-up of fluid in the pleural space. This is called a pleural effusion. This build-up of fluid can put pressure on the lungs and make breathing more difficult.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title">Lung pleura and pleural space</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/IGT_PleuralCavity_EN.jpg" alt="Right lung covered with pleura and inside view of left lung" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The pleura is made up of two thin layers of tissue that cover the lungs and inner chest wall. The space between the two layers is called the pleural space. The pleura aids the lungs during breathing.</figcaption></figure> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Pleural drainage</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/IGT_PleuralEffusion_CatheterDrainage_PleurX_EN.jpg" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A drainage catheter is a soft flexible tube placed into the pleural space around the lung. The tube drains fluid from the pleural space that is compressing the lung and restricting breathing.</figcaption></figure> <h2>Catheter drainage for pleural effusion</h2><p>A catheter is a small tube. For a pleural effusion, a catheter is inserted into the pleural space to drain the fluid that is making your child feel short of breath. The goal of inserting the catheter is to allow your child to remain as active as possible, and to improve their quality of life. Your child’s health-care team will teach you how to connect the catheter to the drainage collection system so that you can drain the fluid from around your child’s lung. They will also provide you with <a href="https://www.bd.com/en-us/offerings/capabilities/interventional-specialties/peritoneal-and-pleural-drainage/about-the-pleurx-drainage-system/patient-information-pleurx-system">information</a> about ordering equipment, making dressing changes, changing the catheter adaptor, and who to contact if you require more information.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A drainage catheter meant for a pleural effusion is a small tube inserted into the pleural space that will drain the fluid that is making your child feel short of breath.</li><li>The drainage catheter helps children manage recurrent build up of fluid in the pleural space at home.</li><li>Your child may be given local anaesthesia, sedation or general anaesthesia depending on their age and condition.</li></ul><h2>Potential drainage catheter complications at home</h2><h3>No drainage</h3><p>If fluid stops draining, it could be because:</p><ul><li>there is no fluid left in the pleural space</li><li>the catheter or system drainage line is blocked</li></ul><p>It is uncommon for either the catheter or the system drainage line to become blocked. If you think the catheter or drainage line may be blocked, squeeze them gently. If drainage does not start again, <a href="https://www.bd.com/documents/guides/directions-for-use/IS_PleurX-Drainage-Procedure_DF_MU.pdf">follow the instructions</a> that came with your drainage system for how to change to another bottle. If drainage does not start when you switch to a second bottle, call your health-care team. The doctor may order a test (such as an ultrasound or <a href="/Article?contentid=1272&language=English">CT scan</a>) to determine how much fluid is in the pleural space, if medication is needed to unblock the catheter, or if the catheter needs to be changed or removed.</p><h3>Site issues</h3><ul><li>Some discomfort and mild redness is expected after insertion but should not worsen or last longer than one week.</li><li>If the catheter is pulled out, or the catheter cuff becomes exposed, cover the exit site with a sterile self-adhesive dressing and seek immediate medical attention.</li><li>If your child’s dressing is wet or loose, change it using the sterile technique you have been taught by your health-care team.</li></ul><h3>Damaged, cut or broken catheter</h3><p>Pinch the catheter closed between your fingers if the catheter becomes damaged, cut or broken. If you have a slide clamp provided in your drainage system kit, slip it over the catheter and tighten the clamp. If you do not have a slide clamp, bend the catheter and tape it in this position. Call your doctor immediately.</p><h3>Disconnected valve or valve malfunction</h3><p>If there are problems with the catheter valve, get a new valve cap and wipe it with an alcohol pad. Place it over the catheter valve and twist it clockwise until it clicks and locks. A damaged valve may allow air into your child's body or let fluid leak out through the valve.</p><h2>When to seek medical assistance</h2><p>After the catheter has been inserted and you are home, you should call your doctor or nurse, or go to the nearest Emergency Department if your child develops any of the following:</p><ul><li>Your child has a fever 37.8°C under the arm or higher, or 38.3°C orally.</li><li>There is a change in the colour, consistency or amount of fluid draining from your child’s chest.</li><li>Your child has pain when you are draining fluid from their chest or pain that continues after draining.</li><li>Your child has redness, swelling, drainage or pain at the catheter insertion site or in the region of the catheter.</li><li>You damage, break or cut the catheter, or it becomes dislodged.</li><li>You see fluid leaking from the valve or catheter.</li></ul><h2>How are drainage catheters inserted?</h2><p>The drainage catheter is placed by an interventional radiologist in the location that will result in the best fluid drainage. The drainage catheter helps children manage recurrent build up of fluid in the pleural space at home. The system includes a catheter that is inserted into the body, and vacuum bottles that allow fluid to be drained quickly, effectively and safely.</p><p>More than one tube may be placed if there is fluid around both lungs, or if there are large, separate pockets of fluid. <a href="/Article?contentid=3001&language=English">Local anaesthetic</a> will be used (even if your child has been given a <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthetic</a> and is asleep), as it helps reduce the amount of pain your child will feel after the tube(s) are placed.</p><p>A small needle is placed into the fluid around the lungs with the assistance of <a href="/Article?contentid=1290&language=English">ultrasound</a>. Two small incisions are then made in the skin, one where the needle goes in and another further down the chest or abdomen where the catheter comes out. The catheter is placed under the skin and into the pleural space. The position of the catheter is then checked with X-rays. Once in the correct place, the catheter is secured with a dressing to protect it. If your child is staying in the hospital, the catheter may be attached to a drainage box or bottle.</p><h2>On the day of the drainage catheter insertion for pleural effusion</h2><h3>Your child will have medicine for pain</h3><p>It is important that your child is as comfortable as possible for the procedure. They may be given local anaesthesia, sedation or general anaesthesia. The type of medicine that your child will have for the procedure will depend on your child’s age and condition.</p><p>During the catheter insertion, you will be asked to wait in the waiting area.</p><h2>After the drainage catheter insertion</h2><p>Once the catheter insertion is complete, your child will be moved to the recovery area. The interventional radiologist will come and talk to you about the details of the procedure. If it was done under sedation or general anaesthesia, as soon as your child starts to wake up, a nurse will come and get you.</p><p>Some children feel local pain or discomfort after the catheter is placed. Your child will be closely monitored and given pain medicine as needed. After a day, most children feel no pain with the catheter.</p><p>The tube can be connected to a drainage collection system, or a collection bottle; or the tube may be closed with a cap if enough fluid was removed during the procedure. Your health-care team will teach you how to connect the catheter to the drainage collection system so that you can drain the fluid from around your child’s lung every day (or as directed by your child’s doctor).</p><h2>Preparing for a drainage catheter insertion</h2><h3>Giving consent before the procedure</h3><p>Before the procedure, the interventional radiologist will go over how and why the procedure is done, as well as the potential benefits and risks. They will also discuss what will be done to reduce these risks and will help you weigh any benefits against them. It is important that you understand all of these potential risks and benefits of the drainage catheter insertion and that all of your questions are answered. If you agree to the procedure, you can give consent for treatment by signing the consent form. A parent or legal guardian must sign the consent form for young children. The procedure will not be done unless you give your consent.</p><h3>How to prepare your child for the procedure</h3><p>Before any treatment, it is important to talk to your child about what will happen. When talking to your child, use words they can understand. Let your child know that medicines will be given to them to make them feel comfortable during the procedure.</p><p>Children feel less anxious and scared when they know what to expect. Children also feel less worried when they see their parents are calm and supportive.</p><h3>Food, drink, and medicines before the procedure</h3><ul><li>Your child’s stomach must be empty prior and during <a href="/Article?contentid=1260&language=English">sedation</a> or general anaesthetic.</li><li>If your child has special needs during fasting, talk to your doctor to make a plan.</li><li>Your child can take their regular morning medicine with a sip of water two hours before the procedure.</li></ul><p>Medicines such as <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=198&language=English">naproxen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=English">warfarin</a>, or <a href="/Article?contentid=129&language=English">enoxaparin</a> may increase the risk of bleeding. Do not give these to your child before the procedure unless they have been cleared first by your child’s doctor and the interventional radiologist.</p><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>If you have any concerns related to your child’s drainage catheter, please ask your home visiting nurses first; or contact your child’s Oncology clinic nurse during working hours. If you have concerns and it is after working hours, call The Hospital for Sick Children switchboard at <strong>(416) 813-7500</strong> and ask them to page the Oncology fellow on call.</p><h2>Resources</h2><p>SickKids uses a brand of drainage catheters called PleurX drainage systems. For more information on the PleurX drainage system, visit the <a href="https://www.bd.com/en-us/offerings/capabilities/interventional-specialties/drainage/about-the-pleurx-drainage-system/pleurx-drainage-system">PleurX drainage system website</a>.</p><p>For patient education material about the PleurX drainage system, visit the <a href="https://www.bd.com/en-us/offerings/capabilities/interventional-specialties/drainage/about-the-pleurx-drainage-system/patient-information-pleurx-system">PleurX patient information page</a>.</p><p>Watch a video on <a href="https://www.bd.com/en-us/company/video-gallery?video=4507949508001">how to drain pleural effusions at home</a>.</p>

 

 

 

 

Catheter drainage for pleural effusion (PleurX drainage system)3822.00000000000Catheter drainage for pleural effusion (PleurX drainage system)Catheter drainage for pleural effusion (PleurX drainage system)CEnglishOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)LungsLungsProceduresAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2019-07-25T04:00:00ZDalia Bozic, MN, RN(EC), NP-PHC7.8000000000000066.40000000000001728.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>A drainage catheter is a soft flexible tube placed into the pleural space around the lung. The tube drains fluid that is compressing the lung and restricting breathing. Learn about the insertion procedure and how to care for the drainage catheter.</p><h2>What is pleural effusion?</h2><p>The lungs are surrounded by a membrane called the pleura:</p><ul><li>The parietal pleura is the outside membrane.</li><li>The visceral pleura is the inside membrane, attached to the lungs.</li></ul><p>Between the pleural membranes, in the area surrounding the lungs, is the pleural space. Sometimes, there can be a build-up of fluid in the pleural space. This is called a pleural effusion. This build-up of fluid can put pressure on the lungs and make breathing more difficult.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title">Lung pleura and pleural space</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/IGT_PleuralCavity_EN.jpg" alt="Right lung covered with pleura and inside view of left lung" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The pleura is made up of two thin layers of tissue that cover the lungs and inner chest wall. The space between the two layers is called the pleural space. The pleura aids the lungs during breathing.</figcaption></figure> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Pleural drainage</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/IGT_PleuralEffusion_CatheterDrainage_PleurX_EN.jpg" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A drainage catheter is a soft flexible tube placed into the pleural space around the lung. The tube drains fluid from the pleural space that is compressing the lung and restricting breathing.</figcaption></figure> <h2>Catheter drainage for pleural effusion</h2><p>A catheter is a small tube. For a pleural effusion, a catheter is inserted into the pleural space to drain the fluid that is making your child feel short of breath. The goal of inserting the catheter is to allow your child to remain as active as possible, and to improve their quality of life. Your child’s health-care team will teach you how to connect the catheter to the drainage collection system so that you can drain the fluid from around your child’s lung. They will also provide you with <a href="https://www.bd.com/en-us/offerings/capabilities/interventional-specialties/peritoneal-and-pleural-drainage/about-the-pleurx-drainage-system/patient-information-pleurx-system">information</a> about ordering equipment, making dressing changes, changing the catheter adaptor, and who to contact if you require more information.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A drainage catheter meant for a pleural effusion is a small tube inserted into the pleural space that will drain the fluid that is making your child feel short of breath.</li><li>The drainage catheter helps children manage recurrent build up of fluid in the pleural space at home.</li><li>Your child may be given local anaesthesia, sedation or general anaesthesia depending on their age and condition.</li></ul><h2>Potential drainage catheter complications at home</h2><h3>No drainage</h3><p>If fluid stops draining, it could be because:</p><ul><li>there is no fluid left in the pleural space</li><li>the catheter or system drainage line is blocked</li></ul><p>It is uncommon for either the catheter or the system drainage line to become blocked. If you think the catheter or drainage line may be blocked, squeeze them gently. If drainage does not start again, <a href="https://www.bd.com/documents/guides/directions-for-use/IS_PleurX-Drainage-Procedure_DF_MU.pdf">follow the instructions</a> that came with your drainage system for how to change to another bottle. If drainage does not start when you switch to a second bottle, call your health-care team. The doctor may order a test (such as an ultrasound or <a href="/Article?contentid=1272&language=English">CT scan</a>) to determine how much fluid is in the pleural space, if medication is needed to unblock the catheter, or if the catheter needs to be changed or removed.</p><h3>Site issues</h3><ul><li>Some discomfort and mild redness is expected after insertion but should not worsen or last longer than one week.</li><li>If the catheter is pulled out, or the catheter cuff becomes exposed, cover the exit site with a sterile self-adhesive dressing and seek immediate medical attention.</li><li>If your child’s dressing is wet or loose, change it using the sterile technique you have been taught by your health-care team.</li></ul><h3>Damaged, cut or broken catheter</h3><p>Pinch the catheter closed between your fingers if the catheter becomes damaged, cut or broken. If you have a slide clamp provided in your drainage system kit, slip it over the catheter and tighten the clamp. If you do not have a slide clamp, bend the catheter and tape it in this position. Call your doctor immediately.</p><h3>Disconnected valve or valve malfunction</h3><p>If there are problems with the catheter valve, get a new valve cap and wipe it with an alcohol pad. Place it over the catheter valve and twist it clockwise until it clicks and locks. A damaged valve may allow air into your child's body or let fluid leak out through the valve.</p><h2>When to seek medical assistance</h2><p>After the catheter has been inserted and you are home, you should call your doctor or nurse, or go to the nearest Emergency Department if your child develops any of the following:</p><ul><li>Your child has a fever 37.8°C under the arm or higher, or 38.3°C orally.</li><li>There is a change in the colour, consistency or amount of fluid draining from your child’s chest.</li><li>Your child has pain when you are draining fluid from their chest or pain that continues after draining.</li><li>Your child has redness, swelling, drainage or pain at the catheter insertion site or in the region of the catheter.</li><li>You damage, break or cut the catheter, or it becomes dislodged.</li><li>You see fluid leaking from the valve or catheter.</li></ul><h2>How are drainage catheters inserted?</h2><p>The drainage catheter is placed by an interventional radiologist in the location that will result in the best fluid drainage. The drainage catheter helps children manage recurrent build up of fluid in the pleural space at home. The system includes a catheter that is inserted into the body, and vacuum bottles that allow fluid to be drained quickly, effectively and safely.</p><p>More than one tube may be placed if there is fluid around both lungs, or if there are large, separate pockets of fluid. <a href="/Article?contentid=3001&language=English">Local anaesthetic</a> will be used (even if your child has been given a <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthetic</a> and is asleep), as it helps reduce the amount of pain your child will feel after the tube(s) are placed.</p><p>A small needle is placed into the fluid around the lungs with the assistance of <a href="/Article?contentid=1290&language=English">ultrasound</a>. Two small incisions are then made in the skin, one where the needle goes in and another further down the chest or abdomen where the catheter comes out. The catheter is placed under the skin and into the pleural space. The position of the catheter is then checked with X-rays. Once in the correct place, the catheter is secured with a dressing to protect it. If your child is staying in the hospital, the catheter may be attached to a drainage box or bottle.</p><h2>On the day of the drainage catheter insertion for pleural effusion</h2><h3>Your child will have medicine for pain</h3><p>It is important that your child is as comfortable as possible for the procedure. They may be given local anaesthesia, sedation or general anaesthesia. The type of medicine that your child will have for the procedure will depend on your child’s age and condition.</p><p>During the catheter insertion, you will be asked to wait in the waiting area.</p><h2>After the drainage catheter insertion</h2><p>Once the catheter insertion is complete, your child will be moved to the recovery area. The interventional radiologist will come and talk to you about the details of the procedure. If it was done under sedation or general anaesthesia, as soon as your child starts to wake up, a nurse will come and get you.</p><p>Some children feel local pain or discomfort after the catheter is placed. Your child will be closely monitored and given pain medicine as needed. After a day, most children feel no pain with the catheter.</p><p>The tube can be connected to a drainage collection system, or a collection bottle; or the tube may be closed with a cap if enough fluid was removed during the procedure. Your health-care team will teach you how to connect the catheter to the drainage collection system so that you can drain the fluid from around your child’s lung every day (or as directed by your child’s doctor).</p><h2>Preparing for a drainage catheter insertion</h2><h3>Giving consent before the procedure</h3><p>Before the procedure, the interventional radiologist will go over how and why the procedure is done, as well as the potential benefits and risks. They will also discuss what will be done to reduce these risks and will help you weigh any benefits against them. It is important that you understand all of these potential risks and benefits of the drainage catheter insertion and that all of your questions are answered. If you agree to the procedure, you can give consent for treatment by signing the consent form. A parent or legal guardian must sign the consent form for young children. The procedure will not be done unless you give your consent.</p><h3>How to prepare your child for the procedure</h3><p>Before any treatment, it is important to talk to your child about what will happen. When talking to your child, use words they can understand. Let your child know that medicines will be given to them to make them feel comfortable during the procedure.</p><p>Children feel less anxious and scared when they know what to expect. Children also feel less worried when they see their parents are calm and supportive.</p><h3>Food, drink, and medicines before the procedure</h3><ul><li>Your child’s stomach must be empty prior and during <a href="/Article?contentid=1260&language=English">sedation</a> or general anaesthetic.</li><li>If your child has special needs during fasting, talk to your doctor to make a plan.</li><li>Your child can take their regular morning medicine with a sip of water two hours before the procedure.</li></ul><p>Medicines such as <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=198&language=English">naproxen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=English">warfarin</a>, or <a href="/Article?contentid=129&language=English">enoxaparin</a> may increase the risk of bleeding. Do not give these to your child before the procedure unless they have been cleared first by your child’s doctor and the interventional radiologist.</p><h2>Risks of catheter drainage for pleural effusion</h2><p>A drainage catheter insertion is usually a low-risk procedure. The risk may increase depending on your child’s condition, age and health.</p><p>The risks of a drainage catheter insertion can include:</p><ul><li>pain or discomfort</li><li>bleeding</li><li>leakage of air back into the pleural space</li><li>infection</li><li>worsening breathing problems</li><li>X-ray exposure</li></ul><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>If you have any concerns related to your child’s drainage catheter, please ask your home visiting nurses first; or contact your child’s Oncology clinic nurse during working hours. If you have concerns and it is after working hours, call The Hospital for Sick Children switchboard at <strong>(416) 813-7500</strong> and ask them to page the Oncology fellow on call.</p><h2>Resources</h2><p>SickKids uses a brand of drainage catheters called PleurX drainage systems. For more information on the PleurX drainage system, visit the <a href="https://www.bd.com/en-us/offerings/capabilities/interventional-specialties/drainage/about-the-pleurx-drainage-system/pleurx-drainage-system">PleurX drainage system website</a>.</p><p>For patient education material about the PleurX drainage system, visit the <a href="https://www.bd.com/en-us/offerings/capabilities/interventional-specialties/drainage/about-the-pleurx-drainage-system/patient-information-pleurx-system">PleurX patient information page</a>.</p><p>Watch a video on <a href="https://www.bd.com/en-us/company/video-gallery?video=4507949508001">how to drain pleural effusions at home</a>.</p>Catheter drainage for pleural effusion (PleurX drainage system)False