Venting a G tube to manage fullness and bloatingVVenting a G tube to manage fullness and bloatingVenting a G tube to manage fullness and bloatingEnglishGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Abdomen;Stomach;Small IntestineDigestive systemProceduresAdult (19+) CaregiversVomiting;Abdominal pain2019-08-01T04:00:00ZHolly Norgrove, RN, BScN;Silvana Oppedisano, MN, RN(EC)7.3000000000000072.8000000000000413.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>If your child is feeling too full or bloated during a feed, you may need to vent the G tube. Discover how to vent a G tube, as well as other ways to manage fullness and bloating problems at home.</p><h2>What are G and GJ tubes?</h2><p>Gastrostomy tubes (G tubes) and gastrojejunostomy tubes (GJ tubes) are feeding devices. A G tube gives liquid nutrition, medication and other fluids directly into the stomach. A GJ tube gives liquid nutrition, medication and other fluids directly into the small intestine (the jejunum). Both G tubes and GJ tubes are placed in a surgical opening in your child's tummy (abdomen) called the stoma. The tunnel from the outside into the stomach is called the tract.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>If your child experiences pain or discomfort during feeds, or is vomiting or burping, they may be feeling full or bloated.</li><li>Venting a G tube means letting gas from your child’s stomach and bowels out through the end of the G tube.</li><li>Never vent a GJ tube.</li></ul><h2>What is venting?</h2><p>Venting a G tube means letting gas from your child’s stomach and bowels out through the end of the G tube. Venting before a feed allows air to escape the stomach before it is filled. This helps to prevent fullness and bloating.</p><p> <strong>Do not vent a GJ tube.</strong></p><h3>What are fullness and bloating?</h3><p>If your child experiences pain or discomfort during feeds, or is vomiting or burping, they may be feeling full or bloated. This may be caused by:</p><ul><li>giving feeds too quickly</li><li>giving too large a volume of feed</li><li>swallowing air or giving extra air through the feeding tube during feeds</li><li><a href="/Article?contentid=6&language=English">constipation</a> </li></ul><h2>How to vent a G tube</h2><p>Before every feed:</p><ol><li>If your child has a non low-profile tube: Open the cap at the end of the tube. </li><li>If your child has a low-profile tube: Attach the feeding tube extension and open the end to allow gas to flow out. </li><li>Hold the tube up to allow air to escape, or pull air from the stomach with a large syringe. Let the air flow into a diaper or cloth, in case stomach contents also leak out.</li><li>Once you see stomach contents or feeds coming back out of the stomach from the end of the tube or extension set, stop venting and <a href="/Article?contentid=3817&language=English&hub=tubefeeding">flush</a> the tube.</li><ul><li>Do not allow too much stomach content to escape. Talk to your health-care team about what is considered ‘too much’ and if re-feeding of stomach contents is necessary for large volumes.</li></ul><li>Close the end of the tube or extension set.</li></ol><p>If your child has a combination G/GJ tube, you can feed into the jejunum at the same time as you vent from the stomach.</p>

 

 

 

 

Venting a G tube to manage fullness and bloating3827.00000000000Venting a G tube to manage fullness and bloatingVenting a G tube to manage fullness and bloatingVEnglishGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Abdomen;Stomach;Small IntestineDigestive systemProceduresAdult (19+) CaregiversVomiting;Abdominal pain2019-08-01T04:00:00ZHolly Norgrove, RN, BScN;Silvana Oppedisano, MN, RN(EC)7.3000000000000072.8000000000000413.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>If your child is feeling too full or bloated during a feed, you may need to vent the G tube. Discover how to vent a G tube, as well as other ways to manage fullness and bloating problems at home.</p><h2>What are G and GJ tubes?</h2><p>Gastrostomy tubes (G tubes) and gastrojejunostomy tubes (GJ tubes) are feeding devices. A G tube gives liquid nutrition, medication and other fluids directly into the stomach. A GJ tube gives liquid nutrition, medication and other fluids directly into the small intestine (the jejunum). Both G tubes and GJ tubes are placed in a surgical opening in your child's tummy (abdomen) called the stoma. The tunnel from the outside into the stomach is called the tract.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>If your child experiences pain or discomfort during feeds, or is vomiting or burping, they may be feeling full or bloated.</li><li>Venting a G tube means letting gas from your child’s stomach and bowels out through the end of the G tube.</li><li>Never vent a GJ tube.</li></ul><h2>What is venting?</h2><p>Venting a G tube means letting gas from your child’s stomach and bowels out through the end of the G tube. Venting before a feed allows air to escape the stomach before it is filled. This helps to prevent fullness and bloating.</p><p> <strong>Do not vent a GJ tube.</strong></p><h3>What are fullness and bloating?</h3><p>If your child experiences pain or discomfort during feeds, or is vomiting or burping, they may be feeling full or bloated. This may be caused by:</p><ul><li>giving feeds too quickly</li><li>giving too large a volume of feed</li><li>swallowing air or giving extra air through the feeding tube during feeds</li><li><a href="/Article?contentid=6&language=English">constipation</a> </li></ul><h2>How to vent a G tube</h2><p>Before every feed:</p><ol><li>If your child has a non low-profile tube: Open the cap at the end of the tube. </li><li>If your child has a low-profile tube: Attach the feeding tube extension and open the end to allow gas to flow out. </li><li>Hold the tube up to allow air to escape, or pull air from the stomach with a large syringe. Let the air flow into a diaper or cloth, in case stomach contents also leak out.</li><li>Once you see stomach contents or feeds coming back out of the stomach from the end of the tube or extension set, stop venting and <a href="/Article?contentid=3817&language=English&hub=tubefeeding">flush</a> the tube.</li><ul><li>Do not allow too much stomach content to escape. Talk to your health-care team about what is considered ‘too much’ and if re-feeding of stomach contents is necessary for large volumes.</li></ul><li>Close the end of the tube or extension set.</li></ol><p>If your child has a combination G/GJ tube, you can feed into the jejunum at the same time as you vent from the stomach.</p><h2>Other way to manage fullness and bloating problems at home</h2><p>To deal with fullness and bloating problems, you can:</p><ul><li>Decrease the feeding rate to see if slower feeds help ease digestion.</li><li>Stop the feed for one to two hours and restart at a slower rate (if you cannot reach the maximum rate after slowly increasing, call your child’s dietitian, , or nurse practitioner).</li><li>Vent the G tube before feeds.</li><li>Ask your child’s doctor to help manage your child’s constipation. Discuss with your child’s dietitian, doctor or nurse practitioner before decreasing or making changes to your child’s feed.</li></ul>Venting a G tube to manage fullness and bloatingFalse