Oral immune therapy for your hospitalized babyOOral immune therapy for your hospitalized babyOral immune therapy for your hospitalized babyEnglishDevelopmentalNewborn (0-28 days);Premature;Baby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months)NANAProceduresAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-02-03T05:00:00Z9.1000000000000055.4000000000000752.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the benefits of providing oral immune therapy to your hospitalized baby using expressed breast milk.</p><h2>What is oral immune therapy?</h2><p>Oral immune therapy is the practice of using your own fresh breast milk to provide mouth care to your baby. This is done by swabbing the inside of your baby’s mouth with breast milk, which provides protective properties as it is absorbed.</p><p>Your body produces protective antibodies that can transfer to your baby through your breast milk. When you have <a href="/Article?contentid=3823&language=English">skin-to-skin contact</a> with your baby, your body will be exposed to your baby’s hospitalized environment. As a result of this exposure, your body can create antibodies that are uniquely designed to benefit your baby through the transfer of breast milk. These antibodies can provide your baby with specialized protection against harmful bacteria, infections or infection-related conditions. Breast milk acts as a medicine in babies who are sick or premature.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Oral immune therapy is a safe and simple practice you can do to benefit your baby.</li><li>Oral immune therapy helps to protect your baby from infections.</li><li>Breast milk acts as a medicine in babies who are sick or premature.</li><li>Oral immune therapy is provided every four hours as part of routine mouth care.</li></ul><h2>How is oral immune therapy provided?</h2><p>Oral immune therapy is provided using fresh colostrum or breast milk that has <strong>never been frozen</strong>, and it is given every four hours as part of routine mouth care. Colostrum and breast milk contain important antibodies that will help develop and strengthen your baby’s immune system.</p><p>In the first couple of days after birth, it is normal to only produce a few drops of colostrum. After expressing colostrum or breast milk, it is important that you <strong>ensure it is labeled with your baby’s breast milk label</strong>.</p><p>Oral immune therapy is the standard of care for any babies who are not feeding orally up to 18 months of age. All babies are allowed to receive this care, even if they are not allowed to be fed, including:</p><ul><li>NPO babies</li><li>Babies receiving tube feeding</li></ul><p>Oral immune therapy is provided using a mouth care applicator swab. Colostrum or breast milk is used to coat the inside of your baby’s mouth and lips. Only a small amount of milk is used, so oral immune therapy is not considered feeding. Your baby’s nurse can teach you how to do this.</p><h2>Who can provide oral immune therapy?</h2><p>You or your baby’s nurse can provide oral immune therapy. It is encouraged that parents participate in this important care whenever they can, as there are many benefits to providing oral immune therapy to your baby:</p><ul><li>It promotes increased attachment and bonding with your baby.</li><li>You feel more involved in your baby’s care.</li><li>It provides a strategy for you when comforting your baby.</li><li>It increases the likelihood that your baby will breastfeed when able.</li></ul><h2>Resources and videos</h2><p> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jCA-s9FZaeo&list=UURXuIrY0w8NPvBptXtfDKvA&index=36">Breast milk mouth care: Boost your baby's immune system</a></p><p><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/breastfeeding">AboutKidsHealth: Breastfeeding Learning Hub</a></p><p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LgLunORv8dA">SickKids: How to establish and maintain a breast milk supply for your hospitalized baby</a></p><p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=fsUy8eerG88">SickKids: Kangaroo Care and the hospitalized infant</a></p><p><a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/breastfeeding-program/index.html">SickKids: Breastfeeding Program</a><br></p>

 

 

 

 

Oral immune therapy for your hospitalized baby3838.00000000000Oral immune therapy for your hospitalized babyOral immune therapy for your hospitalized babyOEnglishDevelopmentalNewborn (0-28 days);Premature;Baby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months)NANAProceduresAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-02-03T05:00:00Z9.1000000000000055.4000000000000752.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the benefits of providing oral immune therapy to your hospitalized baby using expressed breast milk.</p><h2>What is oral immune therapy?</h2><p>Oral immune therapy is the practice of using your own fresh breast milk to provide mouth care to your baby. This is done by swabbing the inside of your baby’s mouth with breast milk, which provides protective properties as it is absorbed.</p><p>Your body produces protective antibodies that can transfer to your baby through your breast milk. When you have <a href="/Article?contentid=3823&language=English">skin-to-skin contact</a> with your baby, your body will be exposed to your baby’s hospitalized environment. As a result of this exposure, your body can create antibodies that are uniquely designed to benefit your baby through the transfer of breast milk. These antibodies can provide your baby with specialized protection against harmful bacteria, infections or infection-related conditions. Breast milk acts as a medicine in babies who are sick or premature.</p><h2>Which babies should receive oral immune therapy?</h2><p>All babies who are not able to feed by mouth should receive oral immune therapy for the many benefits it provides. This includes babies born prematurely and older babies/toddlers who are sick and still receiving breast milk.</p><h2>How does oral immune therapy work?</h2><p>When breast milk comes in contact with your baby’s mouth, it is absorbed into the baby’s body, and the breast milk’s immune components boost the baby’s immune system. Research suggests this practice can help protect a baby from developing infections and harmful inflammation. Your breast milk, in combination with your baby’s saliva, creates an environment that reduces harmful bacteria and boosts healthy bacteria in your baby’s mouth. This good bacteria creates a healthy oral environment and travels to the gut to protect it and support its healthy development.</p><h2>What are the benefits of oral immune therapy for my baby?</h2><p>There are many benefits to providing oral immune therapy to your sick or premature baby:</p><ul><li>It boosts their immune system, providing both local and systemic (whole-body) protection.</li><li>It supports their gut development.</li><li>It provides positive oral and sensory stimulation.</li><li>It enhances their growth.</li><li>It helps them reach full feeds faster and begin breastfeeding sooner.</li><li>It helps develop their taste buds, which leads to an increased acceptance of a variety of flavours as they grow.</li></ul><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Oral immune therapy is a safe and simple practice you can do to benefit your baby.</li><li>Oral immune therapy helps to protect your baby from infections.</li><li>Breast milk acts as a medicine in babies who are sick or premature.</li><li>Oral immune therapy is provided every four hours as part of routine mouth care.</li></ul><h2>How is oral immune therapy provided?</h2><p>Oral immune therapy is provided using fresh colostrum or breast milk that has <strong>never been frozen</strong>, and it is given every four hours as part of routine mouth care. Colostrum and breast milk contain important antibodies that will help develop and strengthen your baby’s immune system.</p><p>In the first couple of days after birth, it is normal to only produce a few drops of colostrum. After expressing colostrum or breast milk, it is important that you <strong>ensure it is labeled with your baby’s breast milk label</strong>.</p><p>Oral immune therapy is the standard of care for any babies who are not feeding orally up to 18 months of age. All babies are allowed to receive this care, even if they are not allowed to be fed, including:</p><ul><li>NPO babies</li><li>Babies receiving tube feeding</li></ul><p>Oral immune therapy is provided using a mouth care applicator swab. Colostrum or breast milk is used to coat the inside of your baby’s mouth and lips. Only a small amount of milk is used, so oral immune therapy is not considered feeding. Your baby’s nurse can teach you how to do this.</p><h2>Who can provide oral immune therapy?</h2><p>You or your baby’s nurse can provide oral immune therapy. It is encouraged that parents participate in this important care whenever they can, as there are many benefits to providing oral immune therapy to your baby:</p><ul><li>It promotes increased attachment and bonding with your baby.</li><li>You feel more involved in your baby’s care.</li><li>It provides a strategy for you when comforting your baby.</li><li>It increases the likelihood that your baby will breastfeed when able.</li></ul><h2>Resources and videos</h2><p> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jCA-s9FZaeo&list=UURXuIrY0w8NPvBptXtfDKvA&index=36">Breast milk mouth care: Boost your baby's immune system</a></p><p><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/breastfeeding">AboutKidsHealth: Breastfeeding Learning Hub</a></p><p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LgLunORv8dA">SickKids: How to establish and maintain a breast milk supply for your hospitalized baby</a></p><p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=fsUy8eerG88">SickKids: Kangaroo Care and the hospitalized infant</a></p><p><a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/breastfeeding-program/index.html">SickKids: Breastfeeding Program</a><br></p>Oral immune therapy for your hospitalized babyFalse