Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)CCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)EnglishInfectious DiseasesChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NAImmune systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversCough;Fever;Diarrhea;Headache;Runny nose;Nasal congestion;Sneezing;Vomiting;Fatigue2020-04-30T04:00:00Z10.400000000000051.60000000000001201.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Find information about coronaviruses and COVID-19. Learn about the signs and symptoms of the virus, who is at greatest risk, how it is spread, how it is diagnosed and how to prevent spread of the virus. Also find out what to do if you think your child may have COVID-19 and what to do if they have been diagnosed with the virus.</p><h2>What are coronaviruses and COVID-19?</h2><p>Coronaviruses (CoV) are a common and large family of viruses. Coronaviruses can cause a mild illness such as the common cold to a more severe illness such as pneumonia (infection of the lungs). Most people who become ill with a coronavirus will recover on their own with no specific antiviral treatment.</p><p>A new or novel strain of coronavirus was identified in late 2019 and has now spread across the globe. The World Health Organization (WHO) has named this novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 and the disease that it causes is named COVID-19. Because there has been worldwide spread of COVID-19, the outbreak was declared a pandemic by the WHO on March 11, 2020. There is serious global concern about this disease because it is very infectious, and in adults it appears to cause more severe pneumonia than that of seasonal influenza. In children, COVID-19 generally causes a mild illness. There is the risk that children can spread the infection to others.</p> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Most people who become ill with COVID-19 will recover on their own.</li><li>COVID-19 is an infection caused by SARS-CoV-2, a respiratory virus which spreads mainly through close contact with an infected person.</li><li>There are things you can do to lower your risk of getting COVID-19, such as washing your hands frequently, not touching your face and avoiding crowded places.</li><li>Current public health guidelines on physical distancing recommend that you stay home as much as possible and if going out in public, to maintain a distance of at least 6 feet (2 metres) from others.</li></ul> <h2>What are COVID-19 signs and symptoms?</h2><p>Your child may have COVID-19 if they have some or all of the following symptoms:</p><ul><li>fever</li><li>cough or sneezing</li><li>sore throat</li><li>difficulty breathing or fast breathing</li><li>body aches</li><li>headache</li><li>chills</li><li>fatigue</li><li>diarrhea and vomiting</li><li>runny or stuffy nose that progresses to one of the above symptoms</li><li>loss of the sense of smell</li></ul><p>Symptoms can take up to 14 days to appear. Some people with COVID-19 have mild or no symptoms at all. In more severe cases people can have difficulty breathing and pneumonia in one or both lungs.</p> <h2>Who is at greatest risk of getting COVID-19?</h2><p>Risk factors for getting COVID-19 include close contact with someone who was infected. At this time, serious illness in children appears to be less common than in adults.</p><p>There is still a lot being learned about COVID-19. It is not yet clear whether children with underlying or chronic medical conditions are at greater risk of getting COVID-19, or of serious illness if they get the infection. Based on what is known about the influenza virus, it would not be unexpected for children with an underlying chronic medical condition (i.e. chronic lung disease or immune deficiency) to be at increased risk of complications from COVID-19.</p> <h2>How is COVID-19 diagnosed?</h2><p>A diagnosis of COVID-19 is usually suspected based on symptoms and can be confirmed by laboratory testing. Testing may be required depending on travel history, exposure history with someone who was diagnosed with COVID-19 or underlying medical conditions. Refer to the most updated <a href="https://www.ontario.ca/page/2019-novel-coronavirus">Ontario general guidelines</a> for information on who should be tested for COVID-19 and ways of accessing testing.</p> <h2>Is there any treatment available for COVID-19?</h2><p>There is no specific treatment recommended for COVID-19 at the moment and most people will recover on their own. Antibiotics are not recommended. Your health-care provider may recommend steps you can take to relieve symptoms.</p><h2>What should I do if my child has been diagnosed with COVID-19?</h2><p>If your child has been diagnosed with COVID-19 and remains well with mild symptoms, they may remain at home throughout their recovery. You will be contacted by public health who will advise you about isolation for your child and any other household members. If you have concerns about your child’s health or are unsure, you should contact your child’s primary health-care provider or Telehealth Ontario (1-866-797-0000). Bring your child to the emergency room and/or call an ambulance if your child develops more serious symptoms as described above.</p> <h2>Should I bring my child to the hospital if I suspect they have COVID-19?</h2><p>If your child has mild symptoms and remains well, it may not be necessary to seek medical attention. You can use the <a href="https://covid-19.ontario.ca/self-assessment/">Ontario COVID-19 self-assessment tool</a> for guidance. If you have other concerns or are unsure, you should contact your child’s primary health-care provider or Telehealth Ontario (1-866-797-0000).</p><p>You should come to the hospital right away if your child has the following symptoms:</p><ul><li>fast breathing or trouble breathing</li><li>bluish skin color</li><li>not drinking enough fluids</li><li>not waking up or not interacting</li><li>being so irritable that the child does not want to be held</li></ul><p>In case of an emergency, call an ambulance and tell the emergency services team you are concerned your child may have COVID-19. If your child has respiratory symptoms (i.e. fever and/or cough) and they are at the hospital for assessment, it is important they wear a mask to avoid spreading the infection to others. If you do not have a mask for this purpose you should ask for one when you arrive at the hospital.</p><h2>References</h2><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020, March 28). Frequently Asked Questions and Answers. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html">https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html</a></p><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020, March 4). How COVID-2019 Spreads. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/transmission.html">https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/transmission.html</a></p><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020, March 18). Prevention & Treatment. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/prevention-treatment.html">https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/prevention-treatment.html</a></p><p>Government of Canada. (2020, March 31). Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): Frequently asked questions (FAQ). Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/frequently-asked-questions.html">https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/frequently-asked-questions.html</a></p><p>Government of Canada. (2020, March 31). Coronavirus infection: Symptoms and treatment. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/coronavirus.html">https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/coronavirus.html</a></p> <p>Government of Canada. (2020, March 25). New Order Makes Self-Isolation Mandatory for Individuals Entering Canada. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/news/2020/03/new-order-makes-self-isolation-mandatory-for-individuals-entering-canada.html">https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/news/2020/03/new-order-makes-self-isolation-mandatory-for-individuals-entering-canada.html</a></p><p>World Health Organization. (2020, March 18). Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) advice for the public. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public">https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public</a></p><p>World Health Organization. (2020, March 9). Q&A on coronaviruses. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronaviruses">https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronaviruses</a></p>

 

 

 

 

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)3872.00000000000Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)CEnglishInfectious DiseasesChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NAImmune systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversCough;Fever;Diarrhea;Headache;Runny nose;Nasal congestion;Sneezing;Vomiting;Fatigue2020-04-30T04:00:00Z10.400000000000051.60000000000001201.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Find information about coronaviruses and COVID-19. Learn about the signs and symptoms of the virus, who is at greatest risk, how it is spread, how it is diagnosed and how to prevent spread of the virus. Also find out what to do if you think your child may have COVID-19 and what to do if they have been diagnosed with the virus.</p><h2>What are coronaviruses and COVID-19?</h2><p>Coronaviruses (CoV) are a common and large family of viruses. Coronaviruses can cause a mild illness such as the common cold to a more severe illness such as pneumonia (infection of the lungs). Most people who become ill with a coronavirus will recover on their own with no specific antiviral treatment.</p><p>A new or novel strain of coronavirus was identified in late 2019 and has now spread across the globe. The World Health Organization (WHO) has named this novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 and the disease that it causes is named COVID-19. Because there has been worldwide spread of COVID-19, the outbreak was declared a pandemic by the WHO on March 11, 2020. There is serious global concern about this disease because it is very infectious, and in adults it appears to cause more severe pneumonia than that of seasonal influenza. In children, COVID-19 generally causes a mild illness. There is the risk that children can spread the infection to others.</p> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Most people who become ill with COVID-19 will recover on their own.</li><li>COVID-19 is an infection caused by SARS-CoV-2, a respiratory virus which spreads mainly through close contact with an infected person.</li><li>There are things you can do to lower your risk of getting COVID-19, such as washing your hands frequently, not touching your face and avoiding crowded places.</li><li>Current public health guidelines on physical distancing recommend that you stay home as much as possible and if going out in public, to maintain a distance of at least 6 feet (2 metres) from others.</li></ul> <h2>What are COVID-19 signs and symptoms?</h2><p>Your child may have COVID-19 if they have some or all of the following symptoms:</p><ul><li>fever</li><li>cough or sneezing</li><li>sore throat</li><li>difficulty breathing or fast breathing</li><li>body aches</li><li>headache</li><li>chills</li><li>fatigue</li><li>diarrhea and vomiting</li><li>runny or stuffy nose that progresses to one of the above symptoms</li><li>loss of the sense of smell</li></ul><p>Symptoms can take up to 14 days to appear. Some people with COVID-19 have mild or no symptoms at all. In more severe cases people can have difficulty breathing and pneumonia in one or both lungs.</p> <h2>Who is at greatest risk of getting COVID-19?</h2><p>Risk factors for getting COVID-19 include close contact with someone who was infected. At this time, serious illness in children appears to be less common than in adults.</p><p>There is still a lot being learned about COVID-19. It is not yet clear whether children with underlying or chronic medical conditions are at greater risk of getting COVID-19, or of serious illness if they get the infection. Based on what is known about the influenza virus, it would not be unexpected for children with an underlying chronic medical condition (i.e. chronic lung disease or immune deficiency) to be at increased risk of complications from COVID-19.</p> <h2>How does COVID-19 spread?</h2><p>The virus that causes COVID-19 is a respiratory virus which spreads mainly through close contact with an infected person. The virus can be transmitted through small droplets projected from the nose or mouth of an infected person through coughing or exhaling which can then be breathed in by other people nearby. These droplets can also land on objects or surfaces and infect other people when they touch these objects or surfaces and then touch their face before washing their hands. Many people with COVID-19 experience only mild symptoms, especially during the early phase of the disease. You can get COVID-19 from someone who is only experiencing very mild symptoms.</p> <h2>How is COVID-19 diagnosed?</h2><p>A diagnosis of COVID-19 is usually suspected based on symptoms and can be confirmed by laboratory testing. Testing may be required depending on travel history, exposure history with someone who was diagnosed with COVID-19 or underlying medical conditions. Refer to the most updated <a href="https://www.ontario.ca/page/2019-novel-coronavirus">Ontario general guidelines</a> for information on who should be tested for COVID-19 and ways of accessing testing.</p> <h2>Is there any treatment available for COVID-19?</h2><p>There is no specific treatment recommended for COVID-19 at the moment and most people will recover on their own. Antibiotics are not recommended. Your health-care provider may recommend steps you can take to relieve symptoms.</p><h2>What should I do if my child has been diagnosed with COVID-19?</h2><p>If your child has been diagnosed with COVID-19 and remains well with mild symptoms, they may remain at home throughout their recovery. You will be contacted by public health who will advise you about isolation for your child and any other household members. If you have concerns about your child’s health or are unsure, you should contact your child’s primary health-care provider or Telehealth Ontario (1-866-797-0000). Bring your child to the emergency room and/or call an ambulance if your child develops more serious symptoms as described above.</p> <h2>What are effective measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19?</h2><ul><li>Like other respiratory viruses, including influenza, it is recommended that you wash your hands frequently by using soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol can also be used.</li><li>Try not to touch your face, nose and eyes.</li><li>Avoid close contact with people who have a fever or cough as feasible.</li><li>Practice cough etiquette by keeping a distance from other people and coughing and sneezing into your flexed elbow or using a tissue to cover your mouth and nose. If you use a tissue, throw it away immediately and then wash your hands.</li><li>Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.</li><li>Practice physical distancing as per current public health guidelines. At present public health is recommending that you stay home as much as possible and if you go out in public then maintain a distance of at least 6 feet (2 metres) from others. Please refer to your local public health unit for further guidance on the recommended physical distancing measures in your area.</li><li>As per Canada's Emergency Order implemented on March 25th, any person entering Canada by air, sea or land are required to self-isolate for 14 days whether or not they have symptoms of COVID-19.</li></ul> <h2>Should I bring my child to the hospital if I suspect they have COVID-19?</h2><p>If your child has mild symptoms and remains well, it may not be necessary to seek medical attention. You can use the <a href="https://covid-19.ontario.ca/self-assessment/">Ontario COVID-19 self-assessment tool</a> for guidance. If you have other concerns or are unsure, you should contact your child’s primary health-care provider or Telehealth Ontario (1-866-797-0000).</p><p>You should come to the hospital right away if your child has the following symptoms:</p><ul><li>fast breathing or trouble breathing</li><li>bluish skin color</li><li>not drinking enough fluids</li><li>not waking up or not interacting</li><li>being so irritable that the child does not want to be held</li></ul><p>In case of an emergency, call an ambulance and tell the emergency services team you are concerned your child may have COVID-19. If your child has respiratory symptoms (i.e. fever and/or cough) and they are at the hospital for assessment, it is important they wear a mask to avoid spreading the infection to others. If you do not have a mask for this purpose you should ask for one when you arrive at the hospital.</p><h2>References</h2><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020, March 28). Frequently Asked Questions and Answers. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html">https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html</a></p><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020, March 4). How COVID-2019 Spreads. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/transmission.html">https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/transmission.html</a></p><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020, March 18). Prevention & Treatment. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/prevention-treatment.html">https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/prevention-treatment.html</a></p><p>Government of Canada. (2020, March 31). Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): Frequently asked questions (FAQ). Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/frequently-asked-questions.html">https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/frequently-asked-questions.html</a></p><p>Government of Canada. (2020, March 31). Coronavirus infection: Symptoms and treatment. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/coronavirus.html">https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/coronavirus.html</a></p> <p>Government of Canada. (2020, March 25). New Order Makes Self-Isolation Mandatory for Individuals Entering Canada. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/news/2020/03/new-order-makes-self-isolation-mandatory-for-individuals-entering-canada.html">https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/news/2020/03/new-order-makes-self-isolation-mandatory-for-individuals-entering-canada.html</a></p><p>World Health Organization. (2020, March 18). Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) advice for the public. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public">https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public</a></p><p>World Health Organization. (2020, March 9). Q&A on coronaviruses. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronaviruses">https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronaviruses</a></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Coronavirus_disease_2019--COVID-19.jpgCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)False