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Abnormal-looking stool (poop)AAbnormal-looking stool (poop)Abnormal-looking stool (poop)EnglishGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Large Intestine/ColonLarge intestine;RectumConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2023-07-21T04:00:00Z7.5000000000000064.1000000000000715.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>An easy-to-understand overview of the signs, symptoms and medical options for children with unusual stool (poop).</p><h2>What causes changes in the appearance of stool?</h2><p>Breastfed babies usually produce a seedy mustard-yellow coloured stool. They may also produce green, runny stool. This is normal. It should not be a concern.</p><p>Most changes in a child's stool (poop) are due to a change in diet. Changes in diet may cause changes in:</p><ul><li>colour</li><li>smell</li><li>consistency</li><li>amount of stool</li></ul><p>Many medicines can affect what stool looks like. If your baby or child is taking medication, ask your pharmacist if you should expect a change in stool. Some changes that last more than a few days may require medical attention.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Most changes in stool are due to a change in diet.</li><li>Runny green or seedy mustard-coloured stool is common in breastfed babies.</li><li>Pale stool accompanied by yellowish skin and eyes or dark urine may indicate a liver problem. Ontario has a new provincial screening program for a liver problem called biliary atresia. If you have concerns your newborn infant has pale-coloured stool, you can now contact <a href="https://www.newbornscreening.on.ca/en/biliary-atresia-screening/contact-form">Newborn Screening Ontario</a> directly.</li><li>Red and jelly-like stool is an emergency. Call 911 or go to the nearest Emergency Department. Do not give your child anything to eat or drink until they are seen by a doctor.</li><li>Small amounts of blood lining the stool are common in children who are constipated. This is not an emergency.</li></ul><h2>When to see a doctor</h2><p> <strong>Make an appointment with your child's doctor if:</strong></p><ul><li>your child seems sick and the stool does not return to its normal colour in a few days</li><li>your child has blood in the stool and constipation is not the reason</li><li>your infant (older than 3 months) or child continues to have pale stool<br></li><li>your baby has green, runny stool and seems sick with other symptoms</li><li>your child's stool is an abnormal colour after taking medication</li></ul><p> <strong>See a doctor right away, or go to the nearest Emergency Department, if:</strong></p><ul><li>your baby or child has red and jelly-like stool. Do not give your child anything to eat or drink until they are seen by a doctor</li><li>your infant (older than 3 months) or child has pale stool and yellowish skin or yellowish whites of the eyes<br></li><li>your child has dark urine (brown or black in colour)</li></ul><p> <strong>Contact <a href="https://www.newbornscreening.on.ca/en/biliary-atresia-screening/contact-form">Newborn Screening Ontario</a> (or your primary care provider if you are not in Ontario) if your newborn baby (less than 3 months old) has pale stool with/without yellowish skin or yellowish whites of the eyes.</strong></p><p>Babies older than 3 months and children with pale stool with/without yellowish skin or whites of the eyes should be seen by their doctor.</p><p>Your child may show physical changes when their condition is serious or when their condition gets worse. Parents and caregivers can learn how to <a href="https://www.healthcareexcellence.ca/media/s3bbk5nv/20221216_signsmaterialsqr_en.pdf">spot these signs</a> in order to seek help from a health-care provider.</p>
Selles anormalesSSelles anormalesAbnormal-looking stoolFrenchGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Large Intestine/ColonLarge intestine;RectumConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2010-10-14T04:00:00Z7.0000000000000064.0000000000000227.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-ZUn aperçu facile à comprendre des signes, des symptômes et des possibilités médicales pour les enfants dont les selles sont anormales. <h2>Qu’est-ce qui cause des selles d’apparence anormale?</h2><p>La plupart des changements aux selles d’un bébé (fèces) sont attribuables à un changement à l’alimentation. Les changements à l’alimentation peuvent entraîner des changements :</p><ul><li>à la couleur;</li><li>à l’odeur;</li><li>à la consistance;</li><li>à la quantité.</li></ul><p>De nombreux médicaments peuvent modifier l’apparence des selles. Si votre bébé ou votre enfant prend des médicaments, demandez à votre pharmacien si vous devez vous attendre à un changement dans les selles. Certains changements qui durent plus que quelques jours pourraient nécessiter des soins médicaux. </p><br><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>La plupart des changements aux selles sont attribuables à un changement dans l’alimentation.</li> <li>Les selles liquides verdâtres ou jaune moutarde sont fréquentes chez les bébés allaités.</li> <li>Les selles pâles accompagnées d’une peau ou d’yeux jaunes, ou d’urine foncée, peuvent être un signe d’hépatite. Consultez un médecin immédiatement.</li> <li>Les selles rouges et s’apparentant à de la gelée sont considérées comme une urgence médicale. Composez le 9-1-1- ou votre service d’urgence local. Ne donnez rien à manger ni à boire à votre enfant pendant que vous attendez l’ambulance.</li> <li>De petites quantités de sang dans les selles sont courantes chez les enfants constipés. Il ne s’agit pas d’une urgence.</li> </ul><h2>Quand consulter un médecin</h2> <p><strong>Prenez un rendez-vous avec le médecin de votre enfant si :</strong></p> <ul> <li>votre enfant a l’air malade et les selles ne reprennent pas leur couleur normale en quelques jours;</li> <li>votre enfant a du sang dans ses selles, et il n’est pas constipé;</li> <li>les selles de votre enfant sont toujours très pâles;</li> <li>votre bébé a des selles verdâtres et liquides, a l’air malade et a d’autres symptômes;</li> <li>votre bébé a des selles verdâtres et liquides, mais il est nourri au biberon uniquement.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Consultez un médecin immédiatement ou allez à une salle d’urgence le plus près si :</strong></p> <ul> <li>votre bébé ou votre enfant a des selles rouges s’apparentant à de la gelée; composez le 9-1-1 ou rendez-vous au service d’urgence le plus près et ne lui donnez rien à manger ni à boire pendant que vous attendez l’ambulance;</li> <li>votre enfant a la peau ou les jeux jaunes;</li> <li>votre enfant a une urine foncée (brune ou noir);</li> <li>les selles de votre enfant sont d’une couleur anormale après qu’il a commencé à prendre des médicaments. </li> </ul>

 

 

 

 

Abnormal-looking stool (poop)4.00000000000000Abnormal-looking stool (poop)Abnormal-looking stool (poop)AEnglishGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Large Intestine/ColonLarge intestine;RectumConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2023-07-21T04:00:00Z7.5000000000000064.1000000000000715.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>An easy-to-understand overview of the signs, symptoms and medical options for children with unusual stool (poop).</p><h2>What causes changes in the appearance of stool?</h2><p>Breastfed babies usually produce a seedy mustard-yellow coloured stool. They may also produce green, runny stool. This is normal. It should not be a concern.</p><p>Most changes in a child's stool (poop) are due to a change in diet. Changes in diet may cause changes in:</p><ul><li>colour</li><li>smell</li><li>consistency</li><li>amount of stool</li></ul><p>Many medicines can affect what stool looks like. If your baby or child is taking medication, ask your pharmacist if you should expect a change in stool. Some changes that last more than a few days may require medical attention.</p><h2>Types of abnormal-looking stool</h2><h3>Brightly coloured stool</h3><p>In older babies and children, green, runny stool can be a sign of <a href="/article?contentid=907&language=english">gastroenteritis</a>. This is also called "stomach flu". Your child may need to see a doctor.</p><h3>Pale stool</h3><p>Whitish, clay or light-coloured stool may be a sign of a bile duct blockage in the liver.</p><p>If your child has pale stool with yellowish skin and eyes, or dark urine, they may have liver disease, such as gallstones or <a href="/article?contentid=819&language=english">a liver infection (viral hepatitis)</a>. Babies with pale stool may have a blockage in the liver called <a href="/article?contentid=4149&language=english">biliary atresia</a>. Contact <a href="https://www.newbornscreening.on.ca/en/biliary-atresia-screening/contact-form">Newborn Screening Ontario</a> (or your primary care provider if you are not in Ontario) if your baby has pale-coloured stools for advice on next steps to investigate this.</p><h3>Fatty stools</h3><p>Floating and foul-smelling stools can be a sign of malabsorption. Malabsorption is when the digestive system does not absorb nutrients adequately. It may occur if your child has intolerance to, a digestive problem with or an allergy to a certain food.</p><h3>Bloody stool</h3><p>Small amounts of fresh blood are common in children who are constipated and straining when passing stool.</p><p>Bloody or slimy stool may be a sign of infection. It may also mean inflammation of the large intestine or rectum. Children with bloody stool may have an <a href="/article?contentid=/article?contentid=7&language=english">infection</a> or <a href="/article?contentid=821&language=english">inflammatory bowel disease</a>. </p><p>If your baby or child's stool has a red, jelly-like appearance, see a doctor right away. Make sure to tell your doctor if your child also has severe stomach pain and a pale complexion. This type of stool may be caused by intestinal obstruction.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Most changes in stool are due to a change in diet.</li><li>Runny green or seedy mustard-coloured stool is common in breastfed babies.</li><li>Pale stool accompanied by yellowish skin and eyes or dark urine may indicate a liver problem. Ontario has a new provincial screening program for a liver problem called biliary atresia. If you have concerns your newborn infant has pale-coloured stool, you can now contact <a href="https://www.newbornscreening.on.ca/en/biliary-atresia-screening/contact-form">Newborn Screening Ontario</a> directly.</li><li>Red and jelly-like stool is an emergency. Call 911 or go to the nearest Emergency Department. Do not give your child anything to eat or drink until they are seen by a doctor.</li><li>Small amounts of blood lining the stool are common in children who are constipated. This is not an emergency.</li></ul><h2>When to see a doctor</h2><p> <strong>Make an appointment with your child's doctor if:</strong></p><ul><li>your child seems sick and the stool does not return to its normal colour in a few days</li><li>your child has blood in the stool and constipation is not the reason</li><li>your infant (older than 3 months) or child continues to have pale stool<br></li><li>your baby has green, runny stool and seems sick with other symptoms</li><li>your child's stool is an abnormal colour after taking medication</li></ul><p> <strong>See a doctor right away, or go to the nearest Emergency Department, if:</strong></p><ul><li>your baby or child has red and jelly-like stool. Do not give your child anything to eat or drink until they are seen by a doctor</li><li>your infant (older than 3 months) or child has pale stool and yellowish skin or yellowish whites of the eyes<br></li><li>your child has dark urine (brown or black in colour)</li></ul><p> <strong>Contact <a href="https://www.newbornscreening.on.ca/en/biliary-atresia-screening/contact-form">Newborn Screening Ontario</a> (or your primary care provider if you are not in Ontario) if your newborn baby (less than 3 months old) has pale stool with/without yellowish skin or yellowish whites of the eyes.</strong></p><p>Babies older than 3 months and children with pale stool with/without yellowish skin or whites of the eyes should be seen by their doctor.</p><p>Your child may show physical changes when their condition is serious or when their condition gets worse. Parents and caregivers can learn how to <a href="https://www.healthcareexcellence.ca/media/s3bbk5nv/20221216_signsmaterialsqr_en.pdf">spot these signs</a> in order to seek help from a health-care provider.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/abnormal_looking_stool.jpgAbnormal-looking stool (poop)FalseAbnormal stool (poop) Most changes in stool are from a diet change, but some may need medical attention. Learn the signs, symptoms and treatments for unusual stool.

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