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Esophageal atresia or tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) repair: How to help your child with eatingEEsophageal atresia or tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) repair: How to help your child with eatingEsophageal atresia or tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) repair: How to help your child with eatingEnglishGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years)EsophagusEsophagusNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-01-26T05:00:00ZBeth Haliburton, RD;Ashley Graham, OT7.0000000000000071.00000000000001078.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Find out how to help your child with swallowing and digesting food after EA/TEF repair.</p><h2>What is esophageal atresia or tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) repair?</h2><p>EA/TEF repair is surgery within the first few days of life to correct <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=373&language=English">defects in the esophagus</a>, the tube leading from the mouth to the stomach.</p><h2>How might EA/TEF repair affect my child’s eating and drinking?</h2><p>After an EA/TEF repair, your child may find it difficult to swallow food and liquids (including their own saliva). This difficulty is called dysphagia.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">How food usually travels through the esophagus</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_swallowing_food_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">When food or liquid is swallowed, it moves from the mouth into the throat (1). From there, it moves into the esophagus, where a wave of muscular contractions pushes it downwards (2). The food then passes into the stomach for further digestion (3).</figcaption> </figure><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Your child might find it difficult to swallow food and liquids after EA/TEF repair. This is called dysphagia.</li> <li>You can help your child by serving foods with dressings or sauces, letting your child take sips of liquid after every two or three bites, cutting food into small pieces and scheduling five or six small meals during the day.</li> <li>If food becomes stuck, stay calm, offer some sips of liquid and distract your child while they wait for the food to pass.</li> <li>Contact your child’s health-care provider if your child finds it hard to swallow even their own saliva, if food does not pass with the help of liquid or if their eating habits have changed a lot for two meals in a row.</li> </ul><h2>How to deal with common swallowing problems</h2> <h3>Food getting stuck</h3> <p>Sometimes food will get stuck in the esophagus for a short time. In most cases, it will slowly pass through or your child will cough it up.</p> <ul> <li>To prevent food from sticking, let your child take a few sips of liquid after every two or three bites.</li> <li>Add more dressings, dips, sauces or gravy to food to help your child swallow it more easily.</li> <li>If food does get stuck, stay calm and offer a few sips of liquid.</li> <li>Suggest that your child sing their favourite song or ask your child simple questions to help stay calm while they wait for the food to go down.</li> <li>If an item remains stuck, contact your health-care provider.</li> </ul> <h3>Inability to eat or drink because of strictures</h3> <ul> <li>If your child’s esophagus becomes strictured (a narrowing caused by scar tissue), they may not be able to eat or drink. Their esophagus will need to be dilated (stretched). In the meantime, your child’s health-care team can give you instructions to care for your child.</li> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">How a stricture affects the movement of food through the esophagus</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_esophageal_stricture_EN.png" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A stricture in the esophagus is a narrowing caused by scar tissue. A stricture can cause food to get stuck.</figcaption> </figure> <li>If your child can still take liquids by mouth, you will be instructed on how to keep them hydrated.</li> <li>If your child has a feeding tube, you will be instructed to give formula or fluids through the tube.</li> </ul><h2>When to get medical help for swallowing difficulties</h2> <p>Contact your child’s healthcare provider if:</p> <ul> <li>your child is struggling to swallow solids, liquids or their own saliva</li> <li>food has gotten stuck and does not pass through with the help of some sips of liquid</li> <li>your child’s eating has changed significantly (only liquids or gagging on or vomiting food) for two meals in a row</li> </ul><h2>How to help your child eat after EA/TEF repair</h2> <h3>Bottle or breastfeeding</h3> <ul> <li>Your child may experience difficulties drinking liquids and may need to be assessed by an occupational therapist (OT) while in the hospital.</li> <li>If your child is struggling to swallow their feeds, their esophagus may have narrowed. Contact your health-care provider.</li> </ul> <h3>Introducing solid food to babies</h3> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=1458&language=English">Pureed food</a> is usually introduced to a child between four and six months of age. This will likely be the case for your child as well. Check with your health-care provider before starting your child on purees.</li> <li>Once your child is able to take smooth purees, feel free to try thicker, more solid textures. First make sure that your child is able to hold their head up and sit comfortably (with some support) in a highchair.</li> </ul> <h3>Offering solids to toddlers and older children</h3> <ul> <li>As your child’s diet progresses, avoid food that is sticky or gooey or food that becomes sticky or gooey after chewing, such as soft bread. This type of food can be hard to swallow because it becomes a sticky ball when it is chewed.</li> <li>Be aware that some children gag and refuse solids or lumpy food. If this is your child’s experience, ask your child’s occupational therapist (OT) for tips to help move from one food texture to another.</li> <li>If you are offering table food, make sure it is cut into small pieces and that your child chews it really well. Very hard food, or food that is not chewed well, can be difficult to swallow and may get stuck.</li> <li>Serve foods with lots of liquids (such as dressings, dips, sauces and gravies) to help with swallowing.</li> <li>Some finger and table food can help to keep scar tissue stretched, but children may tolerate some textures more than others.</li> </ul> <h3>Mealtimes</h3> <p>Mealtimes should be similar to those for any child.</p> <ul> <li>Provide a balanced diet that includes all food groups from Canada’s Food Guide: <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1437&language=English">vegetables and fruit</a>, <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1438&language=English">grain products</a>, <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1439&language=English">milk and alternatives</a>, and <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1440&language=English">meat and alternatives</a>.<br></li> <li>Serve your child several small meals during the day. Many children need to eat five or six small meals throughout the day after esophageal atresia or tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) repair.</li> <li>Aim for meals every three or four hours.</li> <li>Do not let mealtimes last more than 30 minutes.<br></li> <li>Encourage your child to:</li> <ul> <li>sit upright while eating (highchairs or booster seats can help younger children)</li> <li>take small bites and chew their food well</li> <li>eat slowly</li> </ul> <li>If your child finds it difficult to eat within the time limits of school meal or snack times, talk to your health-care provider about offering higher calorie drinks (such as smoothies or yogurt drinks).</li> </ul>
Correction chirurgicale de l’atrésie de l’œsophage ou fistule trachéo-œsophagienne (AO/FTO) : Comment aider votre enfant à s’alimenterCCorrection chirurgicale de l’atrésie de l’œsophage ou fistule trachéo-œsophagienne (AO/FTO) : Comment aider votre enfant à s’alimenterEsophageal atresia or tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) repair: How to help your child with eatingFrenchGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years)EsophagusEsophagusNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-01-26T05:00:00ZBeth Haliburton, RD;Ashley Graham, OT7.0000000000000071.00000000000001078.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p> Apprenez comment aider votre enfant à avaler et à digérer ses aliments suivant la correction de l’AO/FTO.</p><h2>Comment corrige-t-on l’atrésie de l’œsophage ou fistule trachéo-œsophagienne (AO/FTO)?</h2> <p>La correction de l’AO/FTO s’effectue par chirurgie dans les premiers jours suivant la naissance. La chirurgie sert à réparer les <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=373&language=French">anomalies dans l’œsophage</a> qui est le tube reliant la bouche à l’estomac.</p> <h2>Comment la correction de l’AO/FTO peut-elle nuire à la déglutition chez votre enfant?</h2> <p>Suivant la correction de l’AO/FTO, votre enfant peut avoir du mal à avaler les aliments et les liquides (y compris sa propre salive). La difficulté à avaler s’appelle dysphagie.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Comment les aliments se déplacent habituellement dans l’œsophage</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_swallowing_food_FR.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Quand on avale, les aliments ou les liquides passent de la bouche à la gorge (1). Ils descendent ensuite dans l’œsophage, où une onde de contractions musculaires les pousse verticalement (2). Ils se rendent alors dans l’estomac, où la digestion se poursuit (3).</figcaption> </figure><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Votre enfant pourrait avoir de la difficulté à avaler suivant la correction de l’AO/FTO. La difficulté à avaler s’appelle dysphagie.</li> <li>Vous pouvez aider votre enfant à avaler en lui donnant des aliments accompagnés de vinaigrettes ou de sauces, en le faisant boire des gorgées de liquides après deux ou trois bouchées, en coupant ses aliments en petits morceaux et en lui servant cinq ou six petits repas par jour.</li> <li>Si des aliments restent pris dans l’œsophage de votre enfant, restez calme, donnez-lui quelques gorgées de liquides et distrayez-le pendant que vous attendez le dégagement des aliments.</li> <li>Communiquez avec votre fournisseur de soins de santé si votre enfant a du mal à avaler même sa salive, si les aliments pris dans l’œsophage ne se décoincent pas même après l’avoir fait boire ou si, au cours de deux repas consécutifs, vous constatez que les habitudes alimentaires de votre enfant changent de façon marquée.</li> </ul><h2>Comment remédier aux problèmes courants de déglutition</h2> <h3>Coincement des aliments dans l’œsophage</h3> <p>Les aliments peuvent parfois se coincer dans l’œsophage pendant un court moment. Dans la plupart des cas, les aliments passent lentement ou encore l’enfant les crache en toussant.</p> <ul> <li>Pour éviter que les aliments ne collent aux parois de l’œsophage, donnez à votre enfant quelques gorgées de liquide après deux ou trois bouchées.</li> <li>Servez de bonnes quantités de vinaigrettes, de trempettes ou de sauces avec les aliments pour que votre enfant puisse les avaler plus facilement.</li> <li>Si des aliments se coincent dans l’œsophage de votre enfant, restez calme et donnez-lui quelques gorgées de liquides.</li> <li>Demandez à votre enfant de chanter sa chanson préférée ou posez-lui des questions simples pour l’aider à rester calme pendant qu’il attend le passage des aliments.</li> <li>Si une bouchée demeure coincée, communiquez avec votre fournisseur de soins de santé.</li> </ul> <h3>Incapacité de manger ou de boire en raison de la présence de sténoses</h3> <ul> <li>Si le tissu cicatriciel provoque une sténose (rétrécissement) de l’œsophage, votre enfant pourrait être incapable de manger ou de boire. Son œsophage devra alors être dilaté (étiré). L’équipe de soins de santé de votre enfant peut vous donner des instructions sur la façon de prendre soin de votre enfant en attendant la dilatation.</li> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Comment la sténose (rétrécissement) nuit au déplacement des aliments dans l’œsophage</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_esophageal_stricture_FR.png" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Le tissu cicatriciel peut provoquer une sténose (rétrécissement) de l’œsophage où les aliments peuvent se coincer.</figcaption> </figure> <li>Si votre enfant est encore capable de boire des liquides, l’équipe vous dira comment le garder hydraté.</li> <li>Si votre enfant a une sonde d’alimentation, l’équipe vous dira de l’utiliser pour lui donner du lait maternisé ou des liquides.</li> </ul><h2>Quand consulter pour des difficultés de déglutition</h2> <p>Communiquez avec votre fournisseur de soins de santé si :</p> <ul> <li>votre enfant a du mal à avaler les aliments, les liquides ou sa propre salive,</li> <li>des aliments pris dans l’œsophage de votre enfant y restent coincés même après lui avoir donné quelques gorgées de liquide,</li> <li>au cours de deux repas consécutifs, vous constatez que les habitudes alimentaires de votre enfant changent de façon marquée (s’il ne prend que des liquides, s’il a des haut-le-cœur ou s’il vomit).</li> </ul><h2>Comment aider votre enfant à s’alimenter suivant la correction de l’AO/FTO</h2> <h3>Allaitement au biberon ou au sein</h3> <ul> <li>Votre enfant peut éprouver des difficultés à boire, ce qui peut exiger une évaluation par un ergothérapeute durant l’hospitalisation.</li> <li>Si votre enfant a du mal à avaler, son œsophage peut avoir rétréci. Communiquez alors avec votre fournisseur de soins de santé.</li> </ul> <h3>Commencer à donner des aliments solides aux bébés</h3> <ul> <li>On commence habituellement à donner des aliments en purée à un enfant à l’âge de quatre à six mois, ce que vous ferez sans doute également. Consultez votre fournisseur de soins de santé avant d’amorcer ce nouveau régime.</li> <li>Une fois que votre enfant sera capable de manger des purées homogènes, vous pouvez lui offrir des purées plus consistantes, dont la texture est davantage solide. Assurez-vous d’abord que votre enfant est en mesure de garder la tête relevée et de demeurer assis confortablement (avec un certain soutien) dans une chaise haute.</li> </ul> <h3>Offrir des aliments solides aux tout-petits et aux enfants plus âgés</h3> <ul> <li>À mesure que le régime alimentaire de votre enfant devient plus varié, évitez les aliments comme le pain mou qui deviennent collants ou gluants une fois mastiqués. Ces aliments peuvent mal s’avaler puisqu’ils forment des boules gluantes une fois mastiqués.</li> <li>Il est important de savoir que certains enfants peuvent avoir des haut-le-cœur et refuser de manger lorsqu’on leur sert des aliments solides ou grumeleux. Si c’est le cas chez votre enfant, demandez des conseils à son ergothérapeute sur la façon de faire la transition d’une texture d’aliments à une autre.</li> <li>Si vous donnez à votre enfant les mêmes aliments que vous servez aux autres membres de la famille, assurez-vous de les couper en petits morceaux et qu’il les mastique bien. Les aliments très durs ou qui ne sont pas bien mastiqués peuvent être difficiles à avaler et peuvent se coincer dans l’œsophage.</li> <li>Servez de bonnes quantités de liquides (comme des vinaigrettes, des trempettes et des sauces) avec les aliments pour que votre enfant puisse les avaler plus facilement.</li> <li>Certains aliments que votre enfant peut manger seul et certains de ceux que mangent les autres membres de la famille peuvent aider à bien relâcher le tissu cicatriciel. Toutefois, les enfants peuvent mieux tolérer certaines textures que d’autres.</li> </ul> <h3>Repas</h3> <p>Les repas de votre enfant doivent être similaires à ceux que vous serviriez à tout autre enfant.</p> <ul> <li>Assurez-vous que le régime alimentaire de votre enfant est équilibré en lui servant des aliments des quatre groupes du guide alimentaire canadien​ : <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1437&language=French">légumes et fruits</a>, <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1438&language=French">produits céréaliers</a>, <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1439&language=French">laits et substituts</a> et <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1440&language=French">viandes et substituts</a>.</li> <li>Donnez à votre enfant plusieurs petits repas au cours de la journée. Bon nombre d’enfants à qui on a corrigé une atrésie de l’œsophage ou fistule trachéo-œsophagienne (AO/FTO) doivent manger cinq ou six petits repas durant la journée.</li> <li>Le mieux est de faire manger votre enfant à des intervalles de trois ou quatre heures.</li> <li>Ne laissez pas les repas s’étendre sur plus de 30 minutes.</li> <li>Encouragez votre enfant :</li> <ul> <li>à s’asseoir en gardant le dos droit pendant qu’il mange (pour cela, les chaises hautes ou les sièges rehausseurs peuvent être utiles aux jeunes enfants),</li> <li>à prendre de petites bouchées et à bien mastiquer ses aliments,</li> <li>à manger lentement.</li> </ul> <li>Si votre enfant éprouve de la difficulté à respecter le temps accordé pour les repas et les collations à l’école, demandez à votre fournisseur de soins de santé s’il serait bon de lui donner des boissons à forte teneur en calories (comme des frappés aux fruits ou des boissons au yogourt).</li> </ul>

 

 

Esophageal atresia or tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) repair: How to help your child with eating1975.00000000000Esophageal atresia or tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) repair: How to help your child with eatingEsophageal atresia or tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) repair: How to help your child with eatingEEnglishGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years)EsophagusEsophagusNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-01-26T05:00:00ZBeth Haliburton, RD;Ashley Graham, OT7.0000000000000071.00000000000001078.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Find out how to help your child with swallowing and digesting food after EA/TEF repair.</p><h2>What is esophageal atresia or tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) repair?</h2><p>EA/TEF repair is surgery within the first few days of life to correct <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=373&language=English">defects in the esophagus</a>, the tube leading from the mouth to the stomach.</p><h2>How might EA/TEF repair affect my child’s eating and drinking?</h2><p>After an EA/TEF repair, your child may find it difficult to swallow food and liquids (including their own saliva). This difficulty is called dysphagia.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">How food usually travels through the esophagus</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_swallowing_food_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">When food or liquid is swallowed, it moves from the mouth into the throat (1). From there, it moves into the esophagus, where a wave of muscular contractions pushes it downwards (2). The food then passes into the stomach for further digestion (3).</figcaption> </figure><h2>Causes of dysphagia</h2> <ul> <li>Dysphagia can occur if the muscles and nerves of the esophagus have difficulty co-ordinating themselves. This makes it more difficult for food and liquids to move towards the stomach.</li> <li>Sometimes food and liquid can collect in the esophagus at the site of the surgery. This can stretch the upper portion of the esophagus.</li> <li>Scar tissue at the surgical site may tighten. This can make the esophagus stricture (become narrower), causing solid food to get stuck.</li> </ul><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Your child might find it difficult to swallow food and liquids after EA/TEF repair. This is called dysphagia.</li> <li>You can help your child by serving foods with dressings or sauces, letting your child take sips of liquid after every two or three bites, cutting food into small pieces and scheduling five or six small meals during the day.</li> <li>If food becomes stuck, stay calm, offer some sips of liquid and distract your child while they wait for the food to pass.</li> <li>Contact your child’s health-care provider if your child finds it hard to swallow even their own saliva, if food does not pass with the help of liquid or if their eating habits have changed a lot for two meals in a row.</li> </ul><h2>How to deal with common swallowing problems</h2> <h3>Food getting stuck</h3> <p>Sometimes food will get stuck in the esophagus for a short time. In most cases, it will slowly pass through or your child will cough it up.</p> <ul> <li>To prevent food from sticking, let your child take a few sips of liquid after every two or three bites.</li> <li>Add more dressings, dips, sauces or gravy to food to help your child swallow it more easily.</li> <li>If food does get stuck, stay calm and offer a few sips of liquid.</li> <li>Suggest that your child sing their favourite song or ask your child simple questions to help stay calm while they wait for the food to go down.</li> <li>If an item remains stuck, contact your health-care provider.</li> </ul> <h3>Inability to eat or drink because of strictures</h3> <ul> <li>If your child’s esophagus becomes strictured (a narrowing caused by scar tissue), they may not be able to eat or drink. Their esophagus will need to be dilated (stretched). In the meantime, your child’s health-care team can give you instructions to care for your child.</li> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">How a stricture affects the movement of food through the esophagus</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_esophageal_stricture_EN.png" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A stricture in the esophagus is a narrowing caused by scar tissue. A stricture can cause food to get stuck.</figcaption> </figure> <li>If your child can still take liquids by mouth, you will be instructed on how to keep them hydrated.</li> <li>If your child has a feeding tube, you will be instructed to give formula or fluids through the tube.</li> </ul><h2>When to get medical help for swallowing difficulties</h2> <p>Contact your child’s healthcare provider if:</p> <ul> <li>your child is struggling to swallow solids, liquids or their own saliva</li> <li>food has gotten stuck and does not pass through with the help of some sips of liquid</li> <li>your child’s eating has changed significantly (only liquids or gagging on or vomiting food) for two meals in a row</li> </ul><h2>How to help your child eat after EA/TEF repair</h2> <h3>Bottle or breastfeeding</h3> <ul> <li>Your child may experience difficulties drinking liquids and may need to be assessed by an occupational therapist (OT) while in the hospital.</li> <li>If your child is struggling to swallow their feeds, their esophagus may have narrowed. Contact your health-care provider.</li> </ul> <h3>Introducing solid food to babies</h3> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=1458&language=English">Pureed food</a> is usually introduced to a child between four and six months of age. This will likely be the case for your child as well. Check with your health-care provider before starting your child on purees.</li> <li>Once your child is able to take smooth purees, feel free to try thicker, more solid textures. First make sure that your child is able to hold their head up and sit comfortably (with some support) in a highchair.</li> </ul> <h3>Offering solids to toddlers and older children</h3> <ul> <li>As your child’s diet progresses, avoid food that is sticky or gooey or food that becomes sticky or gooey after chewing, such as soft bread. This type of food can be hard to swallow because it becomes a sticky ball when it is chewed.</li> <li>Be aware that some children gag and refuse solids or lumpy food. If this is your child’s experience, ask your child’s occupational therapist (OT) for tips to help move from one food texture to another.</li> <li>If you are offering table food, make sure it is cut into small pieces and that your child chews it really well. Very hard food, or food that is not chewed well, can be difficult to swallow and may get stuck.</li> <li>Serve foods with lots of liquids (such as dressings, dips, sauces and gravies) to help with swallowing.</li> <li>Some finger and table food can help to keep scar tissue stretched, but children may tolerate some textures more than others.</li> </ul> <h3>Mealtimes</h3> <p>Mealtimes should be similar to those for any child.</p> <ul> <li>Provide a balanced diet that includes all food groups from Canada’s Food Guide: <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1437&language=English">vegetables and fruit</a>, <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1438&language=English">grain products</a>, <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1439&language=English">milk and alternatives</a>, and <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1440&language=English">meat and alternatives</a>.<br></li> <li>Serve your child several small meals during the day. Many children need to eat five or six small meals throughout the day after esophageal atresia or tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) repair.</li> <li>Aim for meals every three or four hours.</li> <li>Do not let mealtimes last more than 30 minutes.<br></li> <li>Encourage your child to:</li> <ul> <li>sit upright while eating (highchairs or booster seats can help younger children)</li> <li>take small bites and chew their food well</li> <li>eat slowly</li> </ul> <li>If your child finds it difficult to eat within the time limits of school meal or snack times, talk to your health-care provider about offering higher calorie drinks (such as smoothies or yogurt drinks).</li> </ul>eatingwithTEFhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_swallowing_food_EN.jpgEsophageal atresia or tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) repair: How to help your child with eating

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