Foreskin problems in boysFForeskin problems in boysForeskin problems in boysEnglishUrologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PenisPenisConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2012-07-11T04:00:00ZCathy Daniels, RN, MS, ACNP;Sandra Oliver-Homewood, RN, MN9.0000000000000055.00000000000001169.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to treat common foreskin problems and when to see a doctor.</p><p>The penis is attached to a sheath of skin called the foreskin. </p> <p>Some boys may develop foreskin problems, such as an infection. Many of these issues either go away on their own or with the help of prescription medicine. Proper <a href="/Article?contentid=967&language=English">foreskin care</a> is the best way to prevent many of these issues.</p> <p>Other foreskin problems, such as an accidental injury or a condition, are more serious. These types of issues need treatment right away.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>As the foreskin develops, adhesions can form along the tips of the penis (glans). These are normal, require no treatment, and go away on their own.</li> <li>Pus-like clumps called smegma can sometimes form as the foreskin naturally retracts. This is normal, requires no treatment, and goes away on its own.</li> <li>Minor inflammation or mild balanitis can be treated with 1% hydrocortisone cream.</li> <li>Zipper injuries are common and require emergency treatment.</li> <li>In babies, a hair or thread may tightly twist around the penis, interfering with blood flow (hair tourniquet). This is serious and requires emergency treatment.</li> <li>Some boys may forget to unretract their foreskin, causing it to form a painful, tight ring around the penis (paraphimosis). Using anaesthetic cream and pain medicine, a doctor can help push the foreskin down the penis.</li> </ul>

 

 

Foreskin problems in boys1125.00000000000Foreskin problems in boysForeskin problems in boysFEnglishUrologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PenisPenisConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2012-07-11T04:00:00ZCathy Daniels, RN, MS, ACNP;Sandra Oliver-Homewood, RN, MN9.0000000000000055.00000000000001169.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to treat common foreskin problems and when to see a doctor.</p><p>The penis is attached to a sheath of skin called the foreskin. </p> <p>Some boys may develop foreskin problems, such as an infection. Many of these issues either go away on their own or with the help of prescription medicine. Proper <a href="/Article?contentid=967&language=English">foreskin care</a> is the best way to prevent many of these issues.</p> <p>Other foreskin problems, such as an accidental injury or a condition, are more serious. These types of issues need treatment right away.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>As the foreskin develops, adhesions can form along the tips of the penis (glans). These are normal, require no treatment, and go away on their own.</li> <li>Pus-like clumps called smegma can sometimes form as the foreskin naturally retracts. This is normal, requires no treatment, and goes away on its own.</li> <li>Minor inflammation or mild balanitis can be treated with 1% hydrocortisone cream.</li> <li>Zipper injuries are common and require emergency treatment.</li> <li>In babies, a hair or thread may tightly twist around the penis, interfering with blood flow (hair tourniquet). This is serious and requires emergency treatment.</li> <li>Some boys may forget to unretract their foreskin, causing it to form a painful, tight ring around the penis (paraphimosis). Using anaesthetic cream and pain medicine, a doctor can help push the foreskin down the penis.</li> </ul><h2>Adhesions and smegma</h2><p>As a boy gets older, the foreskin naturally separates from the head of the penis (glans). As this happens:</p><ul><li>parts of the foreskin may remain attached (adhesions). This is normal and does not need any treatment. The foreskin eventually fully separates by the time a boy reaches puberty. Until then, there may be temporary soreness or pain while urinating, but this usually goes away after a day or two.</li><li>the foreskin naturally sheds, leaving small white or yellow clumps behind. These clumps are called smegma and may look like pus. The smegma eventually goes away on its own. There is no need for treatment.</li></ul><h2>Minor inflammation</h2><p>At times, the tip of the foreskin may become red and sore. This is common, especially in babies, due to:</p><ul><li>wet or dirty <a href="/Article?contentid=433&language=English">diapers</a></li><li>retracting (pulling back) foreskin before it is ready</li><li>residue from soap</li></ul><h3>Treating minor inflammation</h3><p>If your son develops inflammation on the foreskin, apply 1% hydrocortisone cream to the affected area. It should heal within seven to 10 days.</p><h2>Balanitis</h2><p>More severe inflammation can happen around the tip of the foreskin, causing redness and swelling. This is due to an infection called balanitis and is often caused by poor hygiene. However, proper foreskin care can prevent it.</p><h3>Treating balanitis</h3><p>If the balanatis is mild, apply 1% hydrocortisone cream. If it is severe or keeps coming back, circumcision may be an option once the redness and swelling go away. Talk to your child's doctor to learn more.</p><p>If a baby gets balanitis, it is usually because of a yeast infection. Use topical anti-yeast cream on the affected area, such as <a href="/Article?contentid=202&language=English">nystatin</a>, clotrimazole, or miconazole.<br></p><h2>Bacterial infection</h2><p>If there is a cut or sore on the foreskin, bacteria can easily invade. The usual type of bacteria, streptococci or staphylococci, can quickly multiply and spread along the entire foreskin. This can cause a bacterial infection called balanoposthitis (say bal-an-op-os-thi-tis). The penis and foreskin swell, become red, and feel painful and very sensitive to the touch.</p><h3>Treating bacterial infection in the foreskin</h3><p>If you or your son thinks he may have developed a bacterial infection, talk to your doctor about treatment. In most cases, bacterial infection inside the foreskin or penis can be treated using:</p><ul><li>oral antibiotics such as <a href="/Article?contentid=96&language=English">cephalexin</a></li><li>topical antibiotics (antibiotic creams for the skin) such as polymyxin B, bacitracin or mupirocin</li></ul><p>Your doctor may prescribe your son oral and topical antibiotics together.</p><p>In adolescents, other germs or conditions may cause an infection. If your teen develops an infection or inflammation on his penis or foreskin, he should see the doctor.</p><p>To ease pain or discomfort, your son can:</p><ul><li>sit in a warm bath with added baking soda or bath salts (but no bubble bath or perfumed soaps)</li><li>take pain medicine such as <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a>.</li></ul><h2>Zipper injury</h2><p>Your son may accidently injure his foreskin by getting it caught in the teeth of a zipper. Aside from being very painful, a zipper injury may damage the tip of the tube inside the penis through which urine flows, called the urethra meatus.</p><p>If a zipper injury happens, take your son to the emergency department right away. Trying to remove skin trapped in a stuck zipper may cause more injury. Leave it alone or cut the clothing around the zipper to make it easier to take him to the hospital.</p><h3>Treating a zipper injury</h3><p>Before detaching the zipper from the penis, your child's doctor may give your son some pain medicine. Sometimes a doctor may inject a small amount of anaesthetic medicine at the base of the penis to numb it for a short time.</p><h2>Hair tourniquet</h2><p>In babies, a hair or thread may tightly twist around the penis, interfering with blood flow. This is called a hair tourniquet (say turn-ee-kay).</p><p>The hair or thread may appear as a thin line around the penis and the affected area usually swells and reddens. Sometimes the hair or thread may be very difficult to see, but if you suspect a hair tourniquet, take your baby to the hospital right away. If it is not dealt with right away, a hair tourniquet can damage nerves or blood vessels.</p><h3>Treating a hair tourniquet</h3><p>Your doctor will remove the tourniquet using a probe and a scalpel or fine-tip scissors. More serious cases may require surgery.</p><h2>Paraphimosis</h2><p>As a boy gets older, his foreskin loosens and he is able to pull back (retract) the foreskin. He can also push the foreskin down the penis (unretract), covering the head of the penis (glans).</p><p>Sometimes, a boy may forget to unretract his foreskin. As a result, it becomes a tight band around the penis shaft. This is a condition called paraphimosis (say par-a-fy-moe-sis), which causes swelling and pain. Fluid can also build up around the area, causing further swelling (edema).</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Paraphimosis</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Paraphimosis_MED_ILL_EN.png" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The penis is covered by a ring of tissue called the foreskin. In a normal penis, the foreskin is loose and retractable to show the glans (head of the penis). In a penis with paraphimosis, the foreskin is so swollen and tight around the shaft that it cannot be unretracted to cover the glans.</figcaption> </figure> <h3>Treating paraphimosis</h3><p>If your son develops paraphimosis, take him to the doctor or an emergency department right away. Paraphimosis rarely requires surgery, but only a doctor should unretract the foreskin.</p><p>Before starting, the doctor will apply an anaesthetic cream. They may also prescribe pain medicine to relieve any discomfort. As the swelling reduces, the doctor will gently unretract the foreskin. Most children will need <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">pain management</a> or even sedation for this procedure.</p><p>A related condition, called <a href="/Article?contentid=889&language=English">phimosis</a>, occurs when boys are unable to retract the foreskin. This can usually be treated.<br></p>foreskinhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Paraphimosis_MED_ILL_EN.pngForeskin problems in boysFalse

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