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YogaYYogaYoga-CANEnglishRheumatology;AdolescentPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodySkeletal systemNon-drug treatmentPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2017-01-31T05:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7wZM-6MD0Oc" frameborder="0"></iframe> <br></div> <h2>What is yoga?</h2><p>Yoga is an ancient system of postures, breathing, relaxation, and meditation practices. They allow you to explore and challenge your body, mind and spirit. It originated in India thousands of years ago. Today most people practice yoga for fitness and to improve their overall sense of well-being. Yoga can also help with managing pain, stiffness and stress in chronic health problems such as JIA.</p>Teens
Yoga and cancerYYoga and cancerYoga and cancerEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z5.4000000000000078.70000000000001514.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Yoga can be a helpful way to reduce stress, stretch and relax. Learn about the benefits of yoga and poses you can do both at home and at the hospital.</p><p>Being a teenager is already stressful. You have your hands full dealing with increasing school and social pressures, hormones, body changes and volatile emotions. Coping with cancer and managing treatment on top of all these other stressors can be difficult for most teenagers. Cancer turns your world upside down and changes everything instantly. But yoga can help.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Yoga is a practice to restore balance between the body, mind and spirit through a series of poses and breathing techniques.</li><li>Yoga can improve fitness, boost wellbeing, improve focus and confidence, and reduce anxiety.</li><li>For cancer patients, yoga can be adjusted to your needs and energy levels, and can be practiced on a mat, in a chair or in bed.</li><li>When practicing yoga, keep a straight back and try not to strain your muscles; remember that none of these poses should cause pain and you should stop right away if they do.</li></ul>Teens
Yoga poses for muscle strengtheningYYoga poses for muscle strengtheningYoga poses for muscle strengthening-CANEnglishRheumatology;AdolescentPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodySkeletal systemNon-drug treatmentPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2017-01-31T05:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>These strength building postures will help you develop stronger muscles while continuing to stretch stiff and sore muscles and joints. If the positions are too difficult, start by doing the modified version of each exercise.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/JIA_Yoga10a_Plank_EN.jpgTeens
Yoga poses for tension reliefYYoga poses for tension reliefYoga poses for tension relief-CANEnglishRheumatology;AdolescentPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodySkeletal systemNon-drug treatmentPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2017-01-31T05:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>These yoga poses help to relieve tension. You can do them when you wake up to relieve morning stiffness, or throughout the day to relieve tension.</p>Teens
You and your partnerYYou and your partnerYou and your partnerEnglishNAPrematureNANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-10-31T04:00:00Z7.8000000000000066.5000000000000797.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about coping with the challenges of taking care of a disabled child. These challenges can have a huge impact on the relationship between the parents.</p><p>Coping with the challenges of taking care of a disabled child can have a huge impact on the relationship between the parents. Even if your relationship is strong, it’s normal for each parent to react and cope differently.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>It is normal for parents to react differently and cope in their own ways when they have a child who is sick or who needs extra care.</li> <li>Make sure you are each caring for yourselves and taking care of your own mental and physical health.</li> <li>Talk to each other and try to find methods of coping together or separately, such as physical activity or support groups.</li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/You_and_your_partner.jpgMain
Your baby's cleft lip repairYYour baby's cleft lip repairYour baby's cleft lip repairEnglishPlasticsNewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)MouthMouthProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2021-05-12T04:00:00Z7.4000000000000068.60000000000002371.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Your baby will need two operations to fix their cleft lip. The first operation is to fix the cleft lip and the second is to remove the sutures (stitches) from the first operation. Learn about the two operations and what you need to know before, during and after both surgeries.</p><p>An operation to repair a cleft lip is usually done when your baby is between 3 and 6 months of age. The timing of the operation depends upon the type of cleft, the general health of your baby and if your baby needs orthodontic treatment (an orthodontic plate called a nasal alveolar molding).</p><p>Your baby will need a second operation to remove the sutures (stitches) that were placed in the first operation that fixed the cleft lip.</p><p>For more information on what a cleft lip is, please read <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=380&language=English">Cleft lip and cleft palate in babies</a>.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Fixing a cleft lip involves two operations. Your baby will need to stay in the hospital overnight after the first operation.</li><li>After surgery, your baby will eat the same way as before, either breastfeeding or bottle feeding.</li><li>Your baby will need to wear arm restraints after the operation to stop them from putting things in their mouth.</li><li>Your baby will look different after the operation.</li><li>Contact the cleft lip and palate nurse coordinator if you have any questions or if your baby has signs of infection.</li></ul><h2>When to call the doctor</h2><p>When at home, call the Plastic Surgery Unit, your baby's surgeon, or the cleft lip and palate nurse coordinator right away if your baby:</p><ul><li>Is not eating or drinking</li><li>Has a fever</li><li>Has redness or oozing from the suture line</li></ul> <h2>When to check in for your baby’s operation</h2><p>Plan to be at the hospital at least two hours before your baby’s operation so you can check in. You will be asked to fill in some forms with the nurse and your baby will have a final assessment before the operation.</p><h2>Pre-operative bath</h2><p>To help prevent infection, all children will have a pre-operative bath using pre-packaged wipes. You will be given a package of bathing wipes to bathe your baby a final time just before their operation. A nurse will explain this to you.</p><h2>During the operation</h2><h3>A cleft lip repair operation usually takes about three hours</h3><p>During the operation, you can wait in the Surgical Waiting Room. The surgeon will give you an update after the operation is finished.</p><p>When the operation is over, your baby will be taken to the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit (PACU), also called the recovery room. Your baby may spend one to two hours in the PACU. You may be able to see your baby for a short visit. When your baby is ready, they will be moved to the Plastic Surgery Unit.</p><h2>After your baby's operation</h2><h3>Visiting and staying overnight at the hospital</h3><p>In general, one parent can stay overnight with their baby during recovery. If you plan to stay overnight, you may wish to bring your own sleeping bag and pillow. The parent is responsible for bringing personal items they need during their stay with their baby. If you are unsure, ask the nurse what to bring and what not to bring.</p><h3>Your baby will look different</h3><p>Be aware that your baby will look different after the operation. There may be some swelling and/or bruising around the lip and face. This could increase for up to two days after the operation but will go away within five to seven days. Your nurse and surgeon will answer any questions you may have about the way your baby looks.</p><h3>Pain management after the operation</h3><p>Your baby will have pain after the operation. Pain medicine will be given to help your baby feel more comfortable and feed. Your baby’s pain will generally be managed with a few different medications, including <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2999&language=English">morphine</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> and <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a>. Your baby may be given pain medicine every four hours, as needed. You know your baby best. If you have concerns about your baby's pain, speak to the surgical and nursing staff.</p><h3>Eating and drinking after the operation</h3><p>After the operation, your baby will feed the same way as before the operation (breastfeeding or bottle feeding).</p><p>To make sure your baby is getting enough liquids, your baby will receive special liquids through their <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=2451&language=English">intravenous (IV) line</a>. An IV is a small tube that is put in the vein of an arm or leg. The IV will stay in place until your baby can drink and keep liquids down.</p><h3>Milk and other liquids</h3><p>Your baby's first drink will be clear fluids or breast milk. Once your baby can keep this down, they can have formula.</p><p>Your baby may not want to drink at first or may take a longer time to feed following the operation. This may be because there is still some pain and swelling. Your baby may also have to get used to the new shape of their mouth and may need to adjust their suck, swallow and breathe pattern. To help your baby drink, the nurse may give them pain medicine about one hour before feeding. Your nurse, lactation consultant or an occupational therapist (OT) will help you feed your baby if there are problems or if you need help.</p><p>If your baby was wearing an orthodontic plate before the operation, they will no longer need it. It may take a little time for your baby to get used to feeding without the orthodontic plate.</p><p>Over time, feeding gets easier.</p><h3>Solid foods</h3><p>If your baby is eating purées you will need to make sure the suture line is properly cleaned after they have finished eating or drinking. See “Suture care” below for more details.</p><h3>Positioning your baby: Awake and asleep</h3><p>The head of your baby's bed will be raised slightly. This will help reduce swelling around their lip. Your baby will not be able to have time on their tummy because they could rub the suture line and slow down the healing process by causing wound breakdown.</p><h3>Activity</h3><p>Your baby must wear arm restraints after the operation to prevent them from putting their hands or other objects in their mouth. These arm restraints are soft, stiff sleeves that fit over your baby's arms and stop the elbows from bending. The arm restraints are put on your baby by the surgeon right after the operation. Your nurse will teach you how to use them. Your baby must wear these restraints 24 hours a day for up to three weeks after the operation. You may take off the restraints to bathe your baby.</p><h3>Suture care</h3><p>It is important that you keep the suture line clean. It is normal for a small amount of blood to ooze along the suture line for up to 24 hours after the operation. After each feed, you will need to clean the suture line with cotton swabs and water. You will also apply a thin layer of petroleum jelly to the suture line. Your nurse will teach you how to do this. Your baby will feel some discomfort during cleaning, but the baby's crying will not harm the sutures.</p><h3>Nasal stents</h3><p>Your baby may or may not have nasal stents in both nostrils after the operation. A nasal stent is a small, soft tube, about the thickness of a straw, which holds the nostril open. These tubes are usually sutured in place after the first operation. Your surgeon will discuss this with you, and your nurse will show you how to care for them. These sutures and the nasal stent will be removed when you return to the hospital to have the sutures in your baby’s lip removed.</p><h3>Your baby will stay in the hospital for one or two days</h3> <p>Once your baby has recovered from the operation and you feel able to take over their care and they are feeding well, your baby can go home. Before you go home, you will be given the instructions you need to care for your baby and any follow-up appointment will be booked.</p><h2>Preparing for your baby’s operation</h2> <h3>Complete a pre-anaesthesia assessment</h3><p>The pre-anaesthesia assessment is usually done as a phone call. A doctor or nurse practitioner will review your baby’s health issues and develop a plan for the anaesthetic for the surgery. Some babies may need to meet with an anaesthesiologist in the Pre-Anaesthesia Clinic. You will be told which type of appointment your baby needs.</p><h3>Follow the orthodontist’s instructions</h3><p>If your baby is using an orthodontic plate and lip taping to prepare for the cleft lip repair, the orthodontist will give you instructions about when to stop lip taping before the operation. Your baby will need to keep the orthodontic plate in until the operation.</p><h3>Pack a bag for your stay</h3><p>You will need to bring your baby’s favourite toy or blanket, sleepers, bottles (if used), car seat and a stroller. Bring a comb, soap, shampoo and other toiletry items that you and your baby will need. If you plan to stay overnight, you may want to bring your own sleeping bag and pillow.</p><p>If you or your baby has any dietary restrictions or preferences, consider bringing these from home (e.g., special formulas, home cooked foods with the texture they are used to). Babies are sometimes picky about their formula or food after the operation. Having something familiar they like can help them recover and go home sooner.</p><h3>Get your baby ready</h3><p>You play an important role in reducing your baby’s risk of infection after their operation by bathing them before their operation. Bathing your baby reduces the number of germs that can cause an infection at the site of the operation. You will need to bathe your baby and wash their hair with shampoo twice before their operation: The first time 48 hours before the operation and the second time 24 hours before the operation.</p><h3>Follow the feeding guidelines</h3><p>Your baby will be given a <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthetic</a> for the operation. This will help your baby fall into a deep sleep so they will not feel any pain or remember the operation. Your baby’s stomach must be empty before they have a general anaesthetic. You must follow the guidelines below to lessen the chance of your baby throwing up, which could hurt your baby's lungs.</p><ul><li>Your baby can have solid food until midnight the night before the operation.</li><li>Your baby can have formula up to six hours before the operation, or breast milk up to four hours before the operation.</li><li>Your baby can have clear fluids up to three hours before the operation. Examples of clear fluids are clear apple juice and water, but not orange juice.</li></ul><p>If you do not follow these feeding guidelines, your baby's operation will be cancelled.</p><p>If you are unsure of these instructions, please call the clinic nurse or cleft lip and palate nurse coordinator a few days before the operation.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/cleft_lip_repair.jpgMain
Your baby's primary health-care teamYYour baby's primary health-care teamYour baby's primary health-care teamEnglishNABaby (1-12 months)BodyNAHealth care professionalsAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00Z11.500000000000045.3000000000000469.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about a baby's primary health-care team: the family physician or paediatrician, and other health-care providers such as the dentist and audiologist.<br></p><p>When your baby is first born, either a family physician or a paediatrician will assess them to make sure they are in good health. After discharge from the hospital, your baby will need to see either a family physician or a paediatrician to ensure that they stay healthy. If health concerns do arise, these professionals are available to help your baby through their challenges, or they may refer them to more specialized health-care providers.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>When your baby is born you will need to decide whether they will be taken care of going forward by a paediatrician or by a family doctor.</li> <li>As your baby gets older they may need to see other health-care professionals including a dentist, optometrist and an audiologist.</li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/PP_baby_462_EN.jpgMain
Your birth planYYour birth planYour birth planEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyNANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00Z9.2000000000000063.6000000000000448.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>How to create an effective birth plan. Things to discuss with the health-care provider, such as banking your baby's umbilical cord blood, are mentioned.</p><p>You may wish to work out a birth plan with your health-care provider some time before delivery. This is a written plan that combines your wishes for childbirth with what your health-care provider thinks is practical. It can help to minimize conflict between you and your health-care provider regarding your options for childbirth. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>A birth plan is a written plan that combines your wishes for childbirth with what your health-care provider thinks is practical.</li> <li>When making a birth plan, you need to consider the different types of interventions that may be offered to help labour and delivery along, such as pain relief or caesarean section.</li> <li>A birth plan is not a written legal contract and it may need to be adjusted, especially if your health or the health of your baby is at risk.</li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/your_birth_plan.jpgMain
Your body image after a transplantYYour body image after a transplantYour body image after a transplantEnglishTransplant;NephrologyTeen (13-18 years)KidneysRenal system/Urinary systemProcedures;Conditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2017-11-30T05:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-ZTeens
Your boyfriend or girlfriendYYour boyfriend or girlfriendYour boyfriend or girlfriend after scoliosis surgeryEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00Z6.0000000000000075.0000000000000293.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn some tips for communicating and coping with your boyfriend or girlfriend's reaction to the news that you need to have scoliosis surgery.</p><p>Boyfriends or girlfriends might not react the way you expect them to when they hear that you need surgery. They might take the challenge of helping you through surgery head on. On the other hand, your surgery might be too much for them to handle. Here is what a couple of teens experienced with their boyfriends when they had surgery.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Your boyfriend or girlfriend might react differently than the way you expect them to when they hear that you need surgery.</li><li>To help cope with your boyfriend or girlfriend's response, provide them with information about the surgery, be clear about your expectations and need of them, and accept that their support during your recovery may not be as strong as other people's.</li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/your_boyfriend_or_girlfriend.jpgTeens
Your cancer treatment planYYour cancer treatment planYour cancer treatment planEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)NANASupport, services and resourcesPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z7.0000000000000071.9000000000000671.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Find out what you can do to make treatment easier, manage your medications and side effects, and how to stay motivated.</p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xEfZY2WDtyI?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> <br></div><h2>What can I do to make treatment easier to manage?</h2><p>Cancer treatment can bring a lot of changes. There may be changes in how you spend your time, how you feel or look or changes in your relationships. There may even be changes in how you view life and your future. </p><p>This session will provide you with information on how to stay focused during treatment so that you are getting the most out of its effects, and so you have the best chance of beating cancer and getting on with your life. </p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Your health-care team will work with you to develop an effective treatment plan.</li><li>Your treatment plan will work best if you follow it completely and on schedule, attend all appointments, take medications as instructed and maintain your overall health as much as possible.</li><li>Stay motivated by surrounding yourself with positive and supportive people and setting achievable goals.</li><li>If you are having trouble sticking to your treatment plan, speak to your health-care team so that they can help you.</li></ul>Teens
Your effect on your child's attachmentYYour effect on your child's attachmentYour effect on your child's attachmentEnglishNABaby (1-12 months)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-09-22T04:00:00Z9.8000000000000047.7000000000000895.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about the different types of adult attachment styles, and how a parent's attachment style can affect their child.</p><p>The Adult Attachment Interview is a questionnaire that evaluates caregivers' early experiences with their own parents, relating them to how the caregivers would respond to their own baby's signals.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>The Adult Attachment Interview evaluates caregivers’ early experiences with their own parents, and relates those experiences to how the caregivers would respond to their baby’s signals.</li> <li>Caregivers are categorized into one of four attachment classifications: secure/autonomous, insecure/dismissing, insecure/preoccupied, or insecure/unresolved.</li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/your_affect_on_your_childs_attachment.jpgMain
Your emotions: At homeYYour emotions: At homeYour emotions: At home after scoliosis surgeryEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00Z5.0000000000000084.0000000000000696.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>When it is time to go home following your scoliosis surgery you may feel nervous or afraid. Learn about some coping techniques that may help you.</p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/v-YLd9_Xghk?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> <br></div><p>Here are some of the ways you may feel when you are home again after surgery. The paragraphs in quotes are what some teens said about their feelings.</p><p>After receiving such intense care from the doctors and nurses at the hospital, you may feel nervous or scared about going home with <em>just</em> your family.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>When it is time to go home after surgery, you may feel nervous or scared about leaving the care of the hospital, relieving your own pain at home or relying on your family for care without the help of the nurses.</li><li>In order to cope with fear of leaving the hospital, set up a support system before you go into the hospital, make sure you and your family have learned how to take care of your recovery, and ask for help when you need it.</li><li>In order to cope with fear about pain control, have your parents fill your prescription before you go home and make sure you have learned how to manage your pain appropriately from your nurses.</li><li>In order to cope with fear of being alone, rememeber that it is a normal feeling to have for most teens who have had scoliosis surgery. Try asking family members to sleep with their doors open, keeping a nightlight in your room, and asking someone to sit with you for a while until you can fall asleep.</li></ul>Teens
Your emotions: Before scoliosis surgeryYYour emotions: Before scoliosis surgeryYour emotions: Before scoliosis surgeryEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00Z5.0000000000000082.0000000000000463.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>When preparing to have scoliosis surgery, it is normal to experience a change in mood, or anxiety. Read about why they occur and tips for managing them.</p><p>Here are some of the ways you may feel when you are waiting for surgery. The paragraphs in quotes are what some teens said about how they felt. </p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>When preparing to have scoliosis surgery, it is normal to experience changes in mood. You might feel angry, sad, hyper or pretend like it is not going to happen.</li><li>In order to cope with your feelings, try talking to someone you trust and try switching your focus to your future after surgery.</li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/your_emotions_before_scoliosis_surgery.jpgTeens
Your emotions: In the hospitalYYour emotions: In the hospitalYour emotions: In the hospital after scoliosis surgeryEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00Z5.0000000000000081.0000000000000660.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Immediately following scoliosis surgery, you may feel irritable and frustrated. Read about why you may feel this way, and tips for dealing with it.</p><p>Here are some of the ways you may feel when you are in the hospital. The paragraphs in quotes are what some teens said about how they felt. </p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Immediately following scoliosis surgery, you may feel irritable and frustrated. You might feel disoriented, confused, grouchy, scared, embarrassed or regretful.</li><li>In order to cope with your feelings, try to visit the hospital before your surgery to get familiar with the setting, bring some things from home to make you feel more comfortable, and remember that your nurses are trained in caring for patients following spine surgery.</li><li>It is important to understand that your time in the hospital and the first few months at home may be difficult. Things will improve with time.</li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/your_emotions_in_the_hospital.jpgTeens
Your fluid needs after a kidney transplantYYour fluid needs after a kidney transplantDrinking enough fluids after a kidney transplantEnglishTransplant;NephrologyTeen (13-18 years)KidneysRenal system/Urinary systemProcedures;Conditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2017-11-30T05:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-ZTeens
Your fluid needs after a liver transplantYYour fluid needs after a liver transplantYour fluid needs after a liver transplantEnglishTransplant;GastrointestinalTeen (13-18 years)LiverDigestive systemProcedures;Conditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2017-11-30T05:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-ZTeens
Your friendsYYour friendsYour friends after scoliosis surgeryEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00Z5.0000000000000088.0000000000000670.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn some tips for communicating your needs and coping with your friends' reactions to you having scoliosis surgery.</p><p>Friends might not react the way you expect them to when you tell them you need surgery. They might be there for you every step of the way. On the other hand, they might let you down when you need them the most. Often this is because they are having difficulty coping with your news, feel helpless and so might avoid you. Other friendships just might not last, but they might not have lasted anyway even if you didn’t need surgery. Some friendships come and go, especially when we are in our teens.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Your friends may react differently than the way you expect them to when they hear that you need surgery.</li><li>Many teens who go through scoliosis surgery worry that they will lose friends while they are at the hospital and during their recovery at home.</li><li>To help cope with your friends' response, be clear about your expectations and need of them, accept that their support during your recovery may not be as strong as other people's, and provide them with information about the surgery and your recovery so they know what to expect.</li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/your_friends.jpgTeens
Your health-care team during pregnancyYYour health-care team during pregnancyYour health-care team during pregnancyEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyNAHealth care professionalsPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00Z11.100000000000044.3000000000000859.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about the health-care team that will take care of you during labour and delivery. Information on choosing a health-care provider is discussed.</p><p>These days, women in the developed world have many choices in terms of who will take care of them through their pregnancy, childbirth, and the first few weeks after birth. When you choose your health-care provider, you need to consider whether your pregnancy is low- or high-risk, how much of a role you want to play in decision-making, and your thoughts about "natural" deliveries and pain medication. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>The three main health-care providers available to pregnant women are an obstetrician, a family physician and a midwife.</li> <li>Many other health-care professionals may also be a part of your health-care team including an anaesthetist, nurses or a doula.</li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/your_health_care_team_pregnancy.jpgMain
Your incision scar, numbness, and painYYour incision scar, numbness, and painYour incision scar, numbness, and painEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00Z84.00000000000005.00000000000000813.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Some teens may experience pain or numbness after scoliosis surgery. Find out how other teens recovering from scoliosis surgery feel about their pain.</p><p>Many teens are afraid that their incision will split open easily. It’s important to understand that your surgeon sews up the incision in layers. There is a lot of support built into this kind of technique so the incision will not split open with everyday activity.</p> <p>The main things to watch for are signs of infection: pus or drainage from the incision, redness, swelling, pain, and a fever.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Your incision will not split open with everyday activity.</li><li>Watch out for any signs of infection, including pus or drainage from the incision, redness, swelling, pain, and a fever.</li><li>You may feel numbness or a tingling sensation around your ribcage area, down the front of your legs, directly over the incision area, and sometimes around your hip. Numbness usually takes up to a year or so to go away.</li><li>In addition to back pain, neck and hip pain are normal and usually get better after a couple of months.</li></ul><p>​For additional pain management resources, please visit the <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/pain?topic=chronicpain">AboutKidsHealth Pain Learning Hub</a><br></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/your_incision_scar_numbness_and_pain.jpgTeens
Your kidney transplant teamYYour kidney transplant teamYour kidney transplant teamEnglishTransplant;NephrologyTeen (13-18 years)KidneysRenal system/Urinary systemProcedures;Conditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2017-11-30T05:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Find out who will be a part of your transplant team and their roles in your care throughout the transplant process.</p><p>Your transplant team will include many different people, some of whom you must meet during your assessment and some who will spend time getting to know you and your family so they can help you through the transplant process. We explain their roles below to help you understand how they can help you.<br></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Your transplant team includes a nephrologist and nephrology fellows, a urologist, an adolescent medicine specialist, nurses, a social worker, a dietitian, an information co-ordinator or secretary.</li><li>Other professionals that may be involved in your care include a child life specialist, a physiotherapist, an occupational therapist, an anaesthetist, a pharmacist, a psychologist or a psychiatrist.</li></ul>Teens
Your liver transplant teamYYour liver transplant teamYour liver transplant teamEnglishTransplant;GastrointestinalTeen (13-18 years)LiverDigestive systemProcedures;Conditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2017-11-30T05:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Find out who will be a part of your transplant team and their roles in your care throughout the transplant process.</p> <p>Your transplant team will include many different people, some of whom you must meet during your assessment and some who will spend time getting to know you and your family so they can help you through the transplant process. We explain their roles below to help you understand how they can help you.<br></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Your transplant team includes a pre-transplant nurse, a nurse practitioner, a gastroenterologist, a transplant doctor, the transplant surgeon, a social worker, a dietitian and an information co-ordinator.</li><li>Other professionals that may be involved in your care include a child life specialist, a physiotherapist, an occupational therapist, an anaesthetist, a pharmacist, an adolescent medicine specialist, a psychologist or a psychiatrist.<br></li></ul>Teens
Your plan for managing symptomsYYour plan for managing symptomsYour plan for managing symptoms-CANEnglishRheumatology;AdolescentPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodySkeletal systemDrug treatment;Non-drug treatmentPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)Joint or muscle pain;Pain2017-01-31T05:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VxpaldtANx4" frameborder="0"></iframe> <br></div>Teens
Your scoliosis surgeryYYour scoliosis surgeryYour scoliosis surgeryEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Here is an introduction to scoliosis surgery. Links are provided to pages that give information about what will happen before, during, and after surgery.</p><h2>What is going to happen in the hospital?</h2><p>Are you wondering what will happen before, during, and after your surgery? Here is what you can find in these pages:<br></p><h2>Key points<br></h2><ul><li>You can find out about what will happen before, during, and after surgery by clicking the links below.</li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/does_scoliosis_cause_pain.jpgTeens
Your stay in hospital after liver transplant surgeryYYour stay in hospital after liver transplant surgeryYour stay in hospital after liver liver transplant surgeryEnglishTransplant;GastrointestinalTeen (13-18 years)LiverDigestive systemProcedures;Conditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2017-11-30T05:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Most liver transplant patients stay in the hospital for 10 days to four weeks after their surgery. However, you may need to stay longer if any problems come up while you recover.</p>Teens
Your three-sentence health summaryYYour three-sentence health summaryYour three-sentence health summaryEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)NANASupport, services and resourcesPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z8.0000000000000064.5000000000000213.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>A three-sentence health summary is a short statement about your health history, treatment and concerns. Learn how to create your own three-sentence health summary.</p><p>In an adult centre, you will be expected to describe your health history in a quick phrase (about three sentences long). It can help to have some practice with this.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A three-sentence health summary is made up of your age, diagnosis and brief health history; your treatment plan; and questions or concerns you may have.</li><li>Your paediatric health-care providers can help you create this summary so all of the information is correct.</li><li>Practice giving your health summary at appointments before you transition to adult care.</li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Your_three-sentence_health_summary.jpgTeens

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