Parvovirus infection (fifth disease, erythema infectiosum)PParvovirus infection (fifth disease, erythema infectiosum)Parvovirus infection (fifth disease, erythema infectiosum)EnglishInfectious DiseasesSchool age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years)SkinImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Fever;Headache;Rash2020-09-02T04:00:00Z7.7000000000000059.1000000000000509.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>A general overview of the symptoms, causes and treatment of Parvovirus B19.</p><br><br><h2>What is Parvovirus B19?</h2> <p>Parvovirus B19 is a virus that causes fifth disease or erythema infectiosum. Fifth disease is also known as "slapped cheek syndrome." This is because it causes a red rash on the cheeks. Parvovirus B19 can spread from person to person. It spreads through droplets in the air or on surfaces we touch. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Parvovirus B19 infection is a viral infection that is usually mild.</li> <li>People with blood disorders and pregnant women are at risk of complications.</li> <li>Once the rash appears, the child is no longer contagious.</li> </ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of Parvovirus B19<br></h2> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">mild fever</a>, chills, headaches and other flu-like symptoms (these usually appear four to 14 days after the virus enters the body, and can last up to three weeks)<br></li> <li>rash that starts after seven to 10 days of symptoms. The rash typically starts on the cheeks, then spreads to the torso and looks red, blotchy and lace-like. The rash then spreads to the arms and the rest of the body<br></li> <li>the rash can be more well-defined after a warm bath (it can be itchy and last from seven to 21 days)</li> <li>joint pain or swelling</li> </ul><h2>How to help your child with Parvovirus B19<br></h2><p>Offer your child fluids often. This helps to avoid dehydration. Treat fever or pain with <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a>. </p><p>Because Parvovirus B19 is caused by a virus, antibiotics will not work. There is no effective lotion or medication for the rash. </p><p>Children who are otherwise healthy usually get better after a few weeks. </p><h2>Complications</h2> <p>Parvovirus B19 can make children with immune system problems or blood disorders such as <a href="/Article?contentid=745&language=English">sickle cell disease</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=840&language=English">thalassemia</a> more sick. </p> <p>The virus can spread from a pregnant woman to her unborn child. If this happens, it can lead to severe and life-threatening conditions in the unborn baby.<br></p><h2>When to seek medical assistance</h2><p>Call your child's regular doctor if: </p><ul><li>your child has a blood disorder or a weakened immune system and you are concerned they may have Parvovirus B19 or have been in contact with someone with Parvovirus B19<br></li></ul><p>Call your doctor if:</p><ul><li>you are pregnant and have been in contact with someone with Parvovirus B19<br></li></ul><p>Go to the nearest Emergency Department or call 911 if your child:</p><ul><li>is unable to drink or eat and is becoming dehydrated</li><li>has trouble breathing</li><li>becomes very pale, tired or weak</li></ul>

 

 

Parvovirus infection (fifth disease, erythema infectiosum)756.000000000000Parvovirus infection (fifth disease, erythema infectiosum)Parvovirus infection (fifth disease, erythema infectiosum)PEnglishInfectious DiseasesSchool age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years)SkinImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Fever;Headache;Rash2020-09-02T04:00:00Z7.7000000000000059.1000000000000509.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>A general overview of the symptoms, causes and treatment of Parvovirus B19.</p><br><br><h2>What is Parvovirus B19?</h2> <p>Parvovirus B19 is a virus that causes fifth disease or erythema infectiosum. Fifth disease is also known as "slapped cheek syndrome." This is because it causes a red rash on the cheeks. Parvovirus B19 can spread from person to person. It spreads through droplets in the air or on surfaces we touch. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Parvovirus B19 infection is a viral infection that is usually mild.</li> <li>People with blood disorders and pregnant women are at risk of complications.</li> <li>Once the rash appears, the child is no longer contagious.</li> </ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of Parvovirus B19<br></h2> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">mild fever</a>, chills, headaches and other flu-like symptoms (these usually appear four to 14 days after the virus enters the body, and can last up to three weeks)<br></li> <li>rash that starts after seven to 10 days of symptoms. The rash typically starts on the cheeks, then spreads to the torso and looks red, blotchy and lace-like. The rash then spreads to the arms and the rest of the body<br></li> <li>the rash can be more well-defined after a warm bath (it can be itchy and last from seven to 21 days)</li> <li>joint pain or swelling</li> </ul><h2>Parvovirus B19 spreads before the rash appears</h2> <p>Parvovirus B19 is typically spread from person to person when a person with the infection coughs or sneezes. The illness is most likely to spread before the rash appears. After the rash appears, a child is no longer contagious. Your child can attend school while they have the rash. <br></p> <h2>How to help your child with Parvovirus B19<br></h2><p>Offer your child fluids often. This helps to avoid dehydration. Treat fever or pain with <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a>. </p><p>Because Parvovirus B19 is caused by a virus, antibiotics will not work. There is no effective lotion or medication for the rash. </p><p>Children who are otherwise healthy usually get better after a few weeks. </p><h2>Complications</h2> <p>Parvovirus B19 can make children with immune system problems or blood disorders such as <a href="/Article?contentid=745&language=English">sickle cell disease</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=840&language=English">thalassemia</a> more sick. </p> <p>The virus can spread from a pregnant woman to her unborn child. If this happens, it can lead to severe and life-threatening conditions in the unborn baby.<br></p><h2>You can reduce the risk of getting Parvovirus B19 by:</h2><ul><li>avoiding close contact with people who are sick</li><li>not touching your eyes, nose or mouth</li><li>washing your hands frequently with alcohol-based hand sanitizer or soap and water</li></ul><p>Once you get Parvovirus B19, you have lifelong immunity.</p><h2>When to seek medical assistance</h2><p>Call your child's regular doctor if: </p><ul><li>your child has a blood disorder or a weakened immune system and you are concerned they may have Parvovirus B19 or have been in contact with someone with Parvovirus B19<br></li></ul><p>Call your doctor if:</p><ul><li>you are pregnant and have been in contact with someone with Parvovirus B19<br></li></ul><p>Go to the nearest Emergency Department or call 911 if your child:</p><ul><li>is unable to drink or eat and is becoming dehydrated</li><li>has trouble breathing</li><li>becomes very pale, tired or weak</li></ul><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/fifth_disease.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/fifth_disease.jpgparvovirusParvovirus infection (fifth disease, erythema infectiosum)False