RehabilitationRehabilitationRehabilitationREnglishOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2018-01-19T05:00:00Z000Landing PageLearning Hub<p>There are many reasons your child may need rehabilitation therapy. A therapist can help with things such as feeding problems or hand difference. If you child has a health condition they may need physiotherapy to help them recover.</p><p>There are many reasons your child may need rehabilitation therapy. An occupational therapist can help with things such as feeding problems, brachial plexus palsy or hand difference. If you child has a health condition or has had surgery they may need physiotherapy to help them recover and stay active.</p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Infant development</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Flattened head syndrome can develop when a baby spends a lot of time on their back. Uneven neck muscles (torticollis) can lead a baby to tilt their head. Find out how occupational therapy and tummy time can prevent and help your child overcome these conditions.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=24&language=English">Positional plagiocephaly (flattened head syndrome)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=972&language=English">Positional plagiocephaly: Treatment with a corrective helmet</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=947&language=English">Torticollis</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=296&language=English">Tummy time: Helping your baby</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Feeding your baby</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Feeding problems can be stressful, especially if there is an underlying medical condition. Learn how an occupational therapist identifies feeding problems and can offer different feeding methods to help your baby eat and drink safely.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=968&language=English">Cleft lip and cleft palate: Spoon feeding and cup drinking</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1684&language=English">Feeding a baby with a heart condition</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2450&language=English">Feeding studies</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=719&language=English">Formula feeding when you cannot provide breastmilk for your baby</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1790&language=English">Nutrition and feeding consultants</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=31&language=English">Sensitive gag reflex: Transition to textured foods</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Congenital conditions</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>A different-shaped hand can present challenges to babies and parents alike. Nerve damage in the upper arm, which can occur during birth, can also affect everyday living skills. Discover how families adapt to these conditions and how they can be treated.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=849&language=English">Brachial plexus palsy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1033&language=English">Brachial plexus operation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=942&language=English">Congenital hand anomaly (hand difference)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1025&language=English">Pollicization</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Rehabilitation and health conditions</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Long-term health conditions and recovery from surgery can often affect a child’s ability to be physically active. Find out how simple exercises can ease muscle or joint pain, help your child stay active and improve your child’s strength and balance.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1544&language=English">Blood and marrow transplant: Exercise and movement after surgery</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1973&language=English">Cystic fibrosis: Physical activity and exercise</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1048&language=English">Crutches: How to use</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1004&language=English">Exercises for enthesitis and arthritis</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1013&language=English">Heart surgery: Physiotherapy after surgery</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=981&language=English">Incentive spirometry or bubbles: Encouraging deep breathing to clear the lungs</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=946&language=English">Toe walking, idiopathic</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Rehabilitation and brain conditions</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Brain conditions can affect a child's speech, memory and movement, among many other things. Find out how treatments and therapies can help your child if they experience infantile seizures, have a brain tumour or are recovering from a head injury.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1406&language=English">Brain tumours: Occupational therapy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1405&language=English">Brain tumours: Physiotherapy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1407&language=English">Brain tumours: Speech therapy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=766&language=English">Head injury and concussion</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1984&language=English">Head injury prevention in children</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=859&language=English">Infantile spasms</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Pain management</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Pain is an everyday occurrence, but acute (sudden) and chronic (long-term) pain often call for different responses. Find out how different therapies can help your child cope with the pain associated with procedures, treatments or ongoing health conditions.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3005&language=English">Pain management: Exercise and physiotherapy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3004&language=English">Pain management: Heat and cold</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3006&language=English">Pain management: Massage and nerve stimulation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3003&language=English">Pain management: Physical treatments</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/rehabilitation_landing_page.jpgrehabilitation,rehab

 

 

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.